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Old 10-10-2018, 06:03 PM   #101
JJtomball
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Originally Posted by frios View Post
no wasted meat


I would challenge you to weight the front shoulders and a neck then tell me no wasted meat.
A bone in neck roast is a fantastic piece of meat.
I shoot the shoulder to save the neck meat.



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Old 10-10-2018, 06:37 PM   #102
DarrellS
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Hunt In: Limestone and Mills Counties
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I generally shoot does in the head.

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Old 10-11-2018, 12:10 AM   #103
RifleBowPistol
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Location: Comal Co.
Hunt In: South Tx, Hill Country, Panhandle
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Originally Posted by J-Fish View Post
How many of you guys successfully neck shoot deer when gun hunting? Any sweet spot you would like to talk about? Any defiant don't do's you would like to share?

I ask because I have always been taught to heart and lung shoot like you would with a bow, but often find myself tearing up the better part of a lower shoulder.

Share the wisdom....
If you are going to take neck shots. Make **** sure you have a good stead rest, very accurate rifle and the deer is inside a range, you can easily keep all of your shots inside a inch. At ranges you are making three inch groups, don't waste your time with neck shots, you will wound deer.

After you meet all of those conditions, try to only shoot them when they are looking right at you, not at an angle, preferably not broad side either. If you hit them correctly, they are pretty much dead instantly, if you are a inch and a quarter too far left or right, you will likely wound them. 95% of the time, they will drop on the stop, if you hit a vertebrae, but not the spine, then quite often, they will get back up and leave. I know of some getting shot in the neck, slammed to the ground. They hit the ground, kick for a while then quit, then start kicking again, get up and run off. Then I know of one, that got shot in the neck, dropped, laid there, did not move for over five minutes, then casually got up and walked off. Hitting vertebrae and not the spine, seems to paralyze them temporarily at times, others, it seems to stun them.

With a good neck shot, they should just fall straight down, no kicking. Almost all of the bad neck shots I know of, were broad side shots. If you really look at a bucks neck from the side, more so, during the rut, there is a lot of non vital tissue that can be seen from the side. I can tell you from experience, a broad side throat shot, is not lethal, not for a few weeks or longer, if ever. A buddy of mine, shot a 9 point in the throat from the side, we never found that deer, we looked for a long time. Then two weeks later, we took another friend and his wife hunting, his wife shot a 9 pointer, with a big hole in it's throat. That buck was shot about 150 yards, from where my buddy shot it. It seemed to be fairly healthy, when it was shot the second time.

My mother shot one broad side in the neck, with a 308, 150 gr. rounds, dropped, did not move for over five minutes. Then sometime over five minutes later, upwards of ten minutes later, the buck just got up and walked off. My mother had unloaded her rifle and put the ammo back in the box, thinking she was done hunting. After she shot the buck, it started raining very hard, it had been raining off and on, before she shot the buck. We were driving over to the blind she was in, 20 to 30 minutes after she shot the buck, we heard the shot and went to check on her. On the way over there, we had a buck walk out of the brush, walk right in front of the truck, never looked at us, had a nice big hole in it's neck. At the time, he rain was coming down hard. I backed the truck up, to aim the head lights at the truck, because I thought I saw something wrong with it's neck and the fact the buck acted like it never saw us, when it was 20 yards in front of the truck. Sure enough, we could see a hole in the buck's neck and it still did not seem to know or care that we were there. We got to my mother's blind, found out she shot a buck, tried to track it in the rain. Figured out it was heading the direction of the buck we had just seen. So we took off to where we had last seen that buck. It got into some very thick short brush, we lost the tracks, it was still raining very hard. Weeks later, I found the buck dead, coyotes had found it before me.

Those are two bucks, that I know for a fact were shot broadside in the neck and got up and left. Then were later found, one alive, one dead. I have seen and heard of quite a few others that were neck shot, almost everyone of them was a broadside shot. Those we never found, so I can't say where they were hit, exactly, but know they were neck shot. If they have been neck shot and they are kicking hard, their spine is still connected to their legs, they will most likely get up and leave, if you don't put another round in them.

For many years, I never had a deer I shot get back up. I used to always shoot them in the neck when they were looking right at me. Everyone of them dropped instantly and never got up. One of the last bucks I shot in the neck, I shot him looking straight away from me, he was following a doe and walking away from me. He went down, never moved. The last buck I neck shot, was a good sized buck, it was walking slowly, from my right to left. Easy broadside shot. I had a 223 and did not want to chance a chest shot. So I tried to shoot it in the neck. Still not sure exactly what happened. I squeezed off the shot, the buck dropped. I was pumped up. It was a pretty good buck. Very big buck for the county I was in. He dropped, straight down. I had to go around some brush to get to him, he was only out of my sight about a minute, maybe less. When I came around the brush, there was no buck laying where he had been laying. I knew what happened and took off running to try and see the buck, before it got out of the pasture. I had to get to the spot where he was, then I would have been able to see around the brush line he was following and hopefully see him before he went over the hill or into some brush on either side of the pasture. He made it up over the top of the hill before I could get to where he had been. I tracked the deer, towards the top of the hill. Then a ranch hand showed up with a dog, he got his dog to track the deer. The dang dog was only able to track the deer, to where the blood stopped. I never found that deer, dead or alive. I am pretty sure he lived and never came back. That was the last deer I tried a neck shot on, for a long time.
The mule deer I shot last year, I neck shot. I was above the deer, on a hill top, he was quartering away. I really was not sure where to aim on that shot, because they say to aim low on steep angle shots. I have never practiced shooting at steep angles, so it was kind of a guess at where the bullet would hit. The buck had stopped and looked back at me. So I put it on his neck, figuring, if it goes high, it hits neck, if it is dead on, it hits neck, if it is low it will hit the neck. I wound up hitting the buck in the base of the neck, he dropped instantly, then tumbled and slid down a hill side quite a ways. He finally wrapped around a large rock. It was a very steep hill, it was not easy getting him off of that hill. Watching him tumble down the hill, was a good and bad feeling. When I knew, I needed to carry him up and over that hill, I knew meant I would have to carry him farther back up to the top. It was worth it, I felt like I was going to die before I got him out of there.
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Old 10-11-2018, 11:47 AM   #104
Jkj1986
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I shoot almost all my deer in the neck.. they don’t take a step.
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Old 10-11-2018, 12:21 PM   #105
2coolforschool
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RifleBowPistol View Post
If you are going to take neck shots. Make **** sure you have a good stead rest, very accurate rifle and the deer is inside a range, you can easily keep all of your shots inside a inch. At ranges you are making three inch groups, don't waste your time with neck shots, you will wound deer.

After you meet all of those conditions, try to only shoot them when they are looking right at you, not at an angle, preferably not broad side either. If you hit them correctly, they are pretty much dead instantly, if you are a inch and a quarter too far left or right, you will likely wound them. 95% of the time, they will drop on the stop, if you hit a vertebrae, but not the spine, then quite often, they will get back up and leave. I know of some getting shot in the neck, slammed to the ground. They hit the ground, kick for a while then quit, then start kicking again, get up and run off. Then I know of one, that got shot in the neck, dropped, laid there, did not move for over five minutes, then casually got up and walked off. Hitting vertebrae and not the spine, seems to paralyze them temporarily at times, others, it seems to stun them.

With a good neck shot, they should just fall straight down, no kicking. Almost all of the bad neck shots I know of, were broad side shots. If you really look at a bucks neck from the side, more so, during the rut, there is a lot of non vital tissue that can be seen from the side. I can tell you from experience, a broad side throat shot, is not lethal, not for a few weeks or longer, if ever. A buddy of mine, shot a 9 point in the throat from the side, we never found that deer, we looked for a long time. Then two weeks later, we took another friend and his wife hunting, his wife shot a 9 pointer, with a big hole in it's throat. That buck was shot about 150 yards, from where my buddy shot it. It seemed to be fairly healthy, when it was shot the second time.

My mother shot one broad side in the neck, with a 308, 150 gr. rounds, dropped, did not move for over five minutes. Then sometime over five minutes later, upwards of ten minutes later, the buck just got up and walked off. My mother had unloaded her rifle and put the ammo back in the box, thinking she was done hunting. After she shot the buck, it started raining very hard, it had been raining off and on, before she shot the buck. We were driving over to the blind she was in, 20 to 30 minutes after she shot the buck, we heard the shot and went to check on her. On the way over there, we had a buck walk out of the brush, walk right in front of the truck, never looked at us, had a nice big hole in it's neck. At the time, he rain was coming down hard. I backed the truck up, to aim the head lights at the truck, because I thought I saw something wrong with it's neck and the fact the buck acted like it never saw us, when it was 20 yards in front of the truck. Sure enough, we could see a hole in the buck's neck and it still did not seem to know or care that we were there. We got to my mother's blind, found out she shot a buck, tried to track it in the rain. Figured out it was heading the direction of the buck we had just seen. So we took off to where we had last seen that buck. It got into some very thick short brush, we lost the tracks, it was still raining very hard. Weeks later, I found the buck dead, coyotes had found it before me.

Those are two bucks, that I know for a fact were shot broadside in the neck and got up and left. Then were later found, one alive, one dead. I have seen and heard of quite a few others that were neck shot, almost everyone of them was a broadside shot. Those we never found, so I can't say where they were hit, exactly, but know they were neck shot. If they have been neck shot and they are kicking hard, their spine is still connected to their legs, they will most likely get up and leave, if you don't put another round in them.

For many years, I never had a deer I shot get back up. I used to always shoot them in the neck when they were looking right at me. Everyone of them dropped instantly and never got up. One of the last bucks I shot in the neck, I shot him looking straight away from me, he was following a doe and walking away from me. He went down, never moved. The last buck I neck shot, was a good sized buck, it was walking slowly, from my right to left. Easy broadside shot. I had a 223 and did not want to chance a chest shot. So I tried to shoot it in the neck. Still not sure exactly what happened. I squeezed off the shot, the buck dropped. I was pumped up. It was a pretty good buck. Very big buck for the county I was in. He dropped, straight down. I had to go around some brush to get to him, he was only out of my sight about a minute, maybe less. When I came around the brush, there was no buck laying where he had been laying. I knew what happened and took off running to try and see the buck, before it got out of the pasture. I had to get to the spot where he was, then I would have been able to see around the brush line he was following and hopefully see him before he went over the hill or into some brush on either side of the pasture. He made it up over the top of the hill before I could get to where he had been. I tracked the deer, towards the top of the hill. Then a ranch hand showed up with a dog, he got his dog to track the deer. The dang dog was only able to track the deer, to where the blood stopped. I never found that deer, dead or alive. I am pretty sure he lived and never came back. That was the last deer I tried a neck shot on, for a long time.
The mule deer I shot last year, I neck shot. I was above the deer, on a hill top, he was quartering away. I really was not sure where to aim on that shot, because they say to aim low on steep angle shots. I have never practiced shooting at steep angles, so it was kind of a guess at where the bullet would hit. The buck had stopped and looked back at me. So I put it on his neck, figuring, if it goes high, it hits neck, if it is dead on, it hits neck, if it is low it will hit the neck. I wound up hitting the buck in the base of the neck, he dropped instantly, then tumbled and slid down a hill side quite a ways. He finally wrapped around a large rock. It was a very steep hill, it was not easy getting him off of that hill. Watching him tumble down the hill, was a good and bad feeling. When I knew, I needed to carry him up and over that hill, I knew meant I would have to carry him farther back up to the top. It was worth it, I felt like I was going to die before I got him out of there.
Best post in the thread. Wish it would have been the first reply to this thread, as I doubt many will actually read it.
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Old 10-11-2018, 12:40 PM   #106
TexasAg91
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Hunt In: Yancey,Glenrose.
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directly in front of shoulder middle of neck. instant drop. wife and I use .223's. no meat loss to speak of. we are sausage people not trophy dudes. total 136 deer,elk,pigs and none ran away. practice,practice,practice.
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Old 10-11-2018, 11:36 PM   #107
LuckyCards2006
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Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: New Braunfels
Hunt In: Atascosa County, Cuero and a few other places
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Do most of my management with a 22-250, mostly neck shots like this one this evening. Name:  IMG_0950.jpg
Views: 92
Size:  135.7 KB
Won’t take a neck shot unless I have a good rest.


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Old 10-12-2018, 06:39 AM   #108
sectxag06
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Location: Austin
Hunt In: Eldorado
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Originally Posted by rut-ro View Post
Not much meat on the shoulder. Shoot there. I know many people have seen deer jaws blown on and they run away. Just my opinion
this. plus the neck meat is better anyway.
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Old 10-12-2018, 04:54 PM   #109
brushtrooper
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Location: South Texas/Gulf Coast
Hunt In: Atascosa County
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I am a neck shooter, I was taught this method from day 1 of hunting. I prefer side shots and anywhere on the neck. I will choose dead center of the neck(between head/shoulder) if I have a choice. I am not a fan of having to shoot the neck from front view or rear view, I like the side even at an angle. I have been hunting about 35 years now, my first deer was a heart shot and I lost him, found him the following day after the yotes picked him clean. I had read in magazines that this was the best shot etc. After that I listened to my father/grand father and went to the neck and they are DRT.
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Old 10-12-2018, 05:01 PM   #110
Flint knapper
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Location: Olney Tx
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I prefer them looking right at me and putting it right in the throat patch
This is what I like also, but would prefer to have a real solid rest and the animal to be less than 100 yards
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