Reply
Go Back   TexasBowhunter.com Community Discussion Forums > Topics > Around the Campfire
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-08-2021, 10:35 AM   #1
CletusBodeen
Pope & Young
 
CletusBodeen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: West
Hunt In: On da couch
Default Autism? How many have children on the spectrum?

A couple of months ago my little boy was diagnosed as a non verbal autistic. It has not changed anything because heís still your average rough and tumble boy that loves to be outside.
He is sensory seeking which is not the normal for autistics.

For a 3 year old that can not talk, he sure knows how to make us feel loved by him.


How many have dealings with autistics/autism?

CletusBodeen is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 10:39 AM   #2
Chief Big Toe
Ten Point
 
Chief Big Toe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Caddo Mills
Hunt In: Sparkman,Arkansas
Default

have a niece that has 2 Boys, the oldest is more severe, but lordy so very smart and caring, her second one was and is more introverted but heck goes to UH and is a hec\k of the Golfer on there team super intelligent, when he was younger, he like the Rain man movie type.... but heck we walked the streets of Vegas all night and he was such a cool kid... Love them for who they are, as they will love you so much more...
Chief Big Toe is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 10:48 AM   #3
Randy
Pope & Young
 
Randy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Centerville
Hunt In: 20' up a tree in Leon County
Default

My son has aspergers.

A literal card carrying genius that's wired a little different.

Reads a novel a day, loves music but hates noise.

Wouldn't trade him for the world.
Randy is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 10:59 AM   #4
Man
Pope & Young
 
Man's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Casper,Tx
Hunt In: Nacogdoches,Tx
Default

I don't know if its just me but it seems the number of people I know that have autistic kids has grown rapidly the past 10-15 years. This has really been eye opening for me in many ways especially the past 5 years or so with regards to foods and chemicals.
Man is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 11:08 AM   #5
JTRichardson
Ten Point
 
JTRichardson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Tomball, Tx
Hunt In: east texas, in your stand when you aint there :)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Man View Post
I don't know if its just me but it seems the number of people I know that have autistic kids has grown rapidly the past 10-15 years. This has really been eye opening for me in many ways especially the past 5 years or so with regards to foods and chemicals.
I don't want to say that processed foods and chemicals are the cause or contribute to the syndrome, but I'm not a scientist so I can't confirm or deny that.

I do however, think, that it has more to do with the medical community making advancements in diagnosing this type of thing.

Like ADHD - when we were younger, kids with severe ADHD were just, "bad kids" - now we know that there is a chemical imbalance causing that behavior. Maybe not the best example because we affectively use meth to treat the cause, but I think it gets my point across.
JTRichardson is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 11:15 AM   #6
CletusBodeen
Pope & Young
 
CletusBodeen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: West
Hunt In: On da couch
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JTRichardson View Post
I don't want to say that processed foods and chemicals are the cause or contribute to the syndrome, but I'm not a scientist so I can't confirm or deny that.

I do however, think, that it has more to do with the medical community making advancements in diagnosing this type of thing.

Like ADHD - when we were younger, kids with severe ADHD were just, "bad kids" - now we know that there is a chemical imbalance causing that behavior. Maybe not the best example because we affectively use meth to treat the cause, but I think it gets my point across.


Itís getting more attention vs years ago. Now with my son, itís obvious but some are high functioning and it makes for a hard diagnosis.
CletusBodeen is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 11:17 AM   #7
Jtrage
Ten Point
 
Jtrage's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Mckinney
Hunt In: Cherokee County
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JTRichardson View Post
I don't want to say that processed foods and chemicals are the cause or contribute to the syndrome, but I'm not a scientist so I can't confirm or deny that.

I do however, think, that it has more to do with the medical community making advancements in diagnosing this type of thing.

Like ADHD - when we were younger, kids with severe ADHD were just, "bad kids" - now we know that there is a chemical imbalance causing that behavior. Maybe not the best example because we affectively use meth to treat the cause, but I think it gets my point across.
Can't speak to processed food and such but I do agree with advancements in diagnosing.

We have 2 nephews. One on my wife's side and one on mine. One would be a "bad kid" when I was growing up. The other is more severe but smarter than me and he is 7. He taught himself the alphabet in more languages than I knew existed.
Jtrage is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 11:23 AM   #8
Chief Big Toe
Ten Point
 
Chief Big Toe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Caddo Mills
Hunt In: Sparkman,Arkansas
Default

i am amazed at the intelligence, like with the oldest, he the most sever as he does not sleak @ 27 yrs old, but man PSP and XBox are kind of match for him, the Comp. gaming is like so easy for him,,, the one in Collage is so smart, i am proud to say i am a great of two of the smartest boys.......in the world God Bless Them!!!
Chief Big Toe is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 11:27 AM   #9
Man
Pope & Young
 
Man's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Casper,Tx
Hunt In: Nacogdoches,Tx
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JTRichardson View Post
I don't want to say that processed foods and chemicals are the cause or contribute to the syndrome, but I'm not a scientist so I can't confirm or deny that.

I do however, think, that it has more to do with the medical community making advancements in diagnosing this type of thing.
I agree. I am not sure that it has anything to do with it, but the reason I am not ruling it out and not to change the topic..but along with the growing amount of people we now know with autistic kids we also know a growing amount of kids with nut allergies and such. Medical advancements or not kids were not killing over 50 years ago from the mere trace of a peanut particle. Hoping i am not derailing the thread, I just think this is a very interesting topic.
Man is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 11:31 AM   #10
Hogmauler
Ten Point
 
Hogmauler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Katy
Hunt In: Kerrville
Default

Our sons brain was damaged when he was two. Afterwards he manifested some autistic tendencies but was never diagnosed with it. He was injured in a stove fire that collapsed a lung. During that time he had a 2.5 hour grand mal seizure that they couldn’t get stopped due to a sorry doctor. In some folks when they seize their brain remembers how to do that and continues to default to that. He endured sixteen years of epilepsy and finally had successful brain surgery. Two inches of his temporal lobe were removed. All was well, no seizures. Until about two years later.
He developed some sort of psychosis. Fortunately it’s not genetic schizophrenia but was caused by the surgery. His neurologist said that he’ll never recover. But God! I’ll never stop praying for him. He a wonderful son and I couldn’t imagine life without.
FYI, don’t dwell on what you believe you lost because that broken record will play over and over in your mind if you allow it to. Thank God that he can express his love for his family. And I’m turn you devote yourself to him by taking care of yourself. Remember, it can always be worse.
Hogmauler is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 11:34 AM   #11
RobinBradbery
Ten Point
 
RobinBradbery's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Manvel
Default

As an adult with HFA (High Functioning Autism) I can say that diagnosis has gotten much better. As a child HFA wasn't even on the radar. I was just called odd, shy, weird, strange and other not nice things. School was so very hard. Not on the academic side but on the social interaction side.

I am glad HFA and other aspects of "the spectrum" are now commonly recognized. There is hope.
RobinBradbery is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 11:49 AM   #12
elgato
Ten Point
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Default

In 1975 one in 5000 children had autism. In 2016 one in 36 were diagnosed with autism. Any parent that ever had an autistic child knows it suggesting diagnosis isn't the cause of the increase . It is interesting that the increase in autism in children has followed the trajectory of increased use of glyphosate [ round up ] in agriculture .

Just sayin...
elgato is online now   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 12:29 PM   #13
CletusBodeen
Pope & Young
 
CletusBodeen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: West
Hunt In: On da couch
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hogmauler View Post
Our sons brain was damaged when he was two. Afterwards he manifested some autistic tendencies but was never diagnosed with it. He was injured in a stove fire that collapsed a lung. During that time he had a 2.5 hour grand mal seizure that they couldnít get stopped due to a sorry doctor. In some folks when they seize their brain remembers how to do that and continues to default to that. He endured sixteen years of epilepsy and finally had successful brain surgery. Two inches of his temporal lobe were removed. All was well, no seizures. Until about two years later.
He developed some sort of psychosis. Fortunately itís not genetic schizophrenia but was caused by the surgery. His neurologist said that heíll never recover. But God! Iíll never stop praying for him. He a wonderful son and I couldnít imagine life without.
FYI, donít dwell on what you believe you lost because that broken record will play over and over in your mind if you allow it to. Thank God that he can express his love for his family. And Iím turn you devote yourself to him by taking care of yourself. Remember, it can always be worse.


I can say I was heart broken when he was diagnosed because all the dreams I had for him were thrown out but with prayer and faith I am learning to see his abilities and not a disability. Heís wired differently but not broken.
CletusBodeen is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 12:32 PM   #14
FamousAmos
Ten Point
 
FamousAmos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Burleson
Hunt In: Mason and Menard
Default

I have a grandson with autism who is one of the best kids I know. I am biased, for sure, but we hear that description from so many who are in his life. He is gifted in so many ways. He struggles socially, but otherwise does just fine.
FamousAmos is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 12:32 PM   #15
c3products20
Eight Point
 
c3products20's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Default

Since everyone is all up in arms about vaccines I'll throw this out there..... I have 4 sons. When we had our oldest we knew we didnt want him vaccinated with all the shots they push on you when your baby is first born and a few months old. We did vaccinate him when he was 4 yrs old and then again at 6 for the 2nd round. But we didnt give him all the shots they said we had to do. Our 2nd son was born and we listened to the doctor who gave us grief about not vaccinating our 1st. So we followed protocol and I know for 100% certainty that those shots jacked him up.... He was a very coherent baby. Responsive, laughing and playing when I played with him. The day after he came home from his 1st round of shots I knew there was something going on. It was like he wasn't there. Wasnt responding wasn't laughing or smiling and playing. He spiked a high fever for a few days and was never the same. To this day he is way more clumsy than our other boys and he has some minor autistic signs. We haven't completely vaccinated our other boys and we did not give them anything when they were first born or very young.. I know for a fact that my sons mind was altered from that vaccine or the fever as a result of the vaccine. I did a little research after our 2nd son had the reaction. Imo the ties of vaccines to autism shows to be more than a slight coincidence.... I'm not saying this is the case for everyone but this is what happened in our house.
c3products20 is online now   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 12:37 PM   #16
CletusBodeen
Pope & Young
 
CletusBodeen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: West
Hunt In: On da couch
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by FamousAmos View Post
I have a grandson with autism who is one of the best kids I know. I am biased, for sure, but we hear that description from so many who are in his life. He is gifted in so many ways. He struggles socially, but otherwise does just fine.


My little struggles with the social and the academic. He is 3 and operates on a 18 month old level for the most part. He is very delayed. His speech is getting better but you have to be around him to figure out what heís trying to tell you. Heís finally started pointing which helps identify his wants. We have been teaching him sign language since he was 18 months old because we saw the delay then and wanted to be proactive.
My wife (his momma) is a sped teacher and has worked with multiple autistic kids through the school system. What she has learned there weíve been able to transfer to Raylan to help him. If it wasnít for her chosen career I think we would be way behind the curve with him.
CletusBodeen is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 12:40 PM   #17
SabineHunter
Ten Point
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Default

I don't trust the medical profession and pharm companies to be giving us the truth about the vax.
SabineHunter is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 12:53 PM   #18
Hogmauler
Ten Point
 
Hogmauler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Katy
Hunt In: Kerrville
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CletusBodeen View Post
I can say I was heart broken when he was diagnosed because all the dreams I had for him were thrown out but with prayer and faith I am learning to see his abilities and not a disability. Heís wired differently but not broken.
I felt the same way Clint. I had it all figured out. He grow up and go to college, play football at A&M, meet a girl, get married, have kids, and weíd be grandparents. Imagine putting a handful of marbles in a jar for everyone of those life stages. Then take that jar and smash it on the floor. All our hopes and dreams, hopes and dreams most people take for granted, weíre devastated. So weíve spent the last 25 years putting the pieces back together to the best of our ability. We have good days and bad. But Iíve found that my life is healthier when I live one day at a time, and walk by faith not by sight. Is my heart broken ? Yes. But I know that God is in control, He has a plan, and His plan will always be better than mine. Iím here for you and anyone else here thatís just starting this journey.
Hogmauler is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 12:58 PM   #19
S-3 Ranch
Pope & Young
 
S-3 Ranch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Sisterdale
Hunt In: Sisterdale and el dorado , Jeff Davis, refugio/sinton , San perlita
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SabineHunter View Post
I don't trust the medical profession and pharm companies to be giving us the truth about the vax.
I am not worried about any vaccines , itís the people depending on
Psychogenic medication reproducing while medicated that make me wonder what big pharmaceutical companies are hiding,
S-3 Ranch is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 01:15 PM   #20
RattlesnakeDan
Ten Point
 
RattlesnakeDan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: Floresville
Hunt In: Everywhere
Default

Autism has risen with vaccinations. It is no secret that the ingredients in the vax's people allow into their bodies and their children can have dreaded side effects. Look at the ingredients...the issue is that we have learned to trust folks that we believe have our best interests at heart. They don't.
RattlesnakeDan is online now   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 01:16 PM   #21
roberts
Ten Point
 
roberts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Austin, TX
Hunt In: Hill Country
Default

My son who will be turning 15 this year is on the spectrum. He was speech delayed until he was 4. Now I cannot get him to shut up. We have worked really hard with him, with all kinds of therapy (speech, PT, Hippa). He is very high functioning and sharp as a tack. Just has problems getting his expressions out. We did teach him sign language at an early age, which helped some. He would point and grunt at things that he wanted, the therapist told us to make him say the word of the thing that he wanted or try to say the word.

It has been a long road and I know we are still not there, but I would not change anything. My son does all of the normal things that any kid his age does. You can tell that he is a little socially ackward, but he is not your normal autistic kid, as he is not shy. He will talk your ear off.

He is catching up on his development delays in school, he takes most normal classes with some inclusion. He does make good grades, but it is a chore keeping him on track.

There are organizations out there that will come into your home, since your son is so young, to help with some home therapy. It will help both parents in the long run. It sure did help me. Like it was said, my son is wired different, just need to know which wires control what.
roberts is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 01:17 PM   #22
Dugie
Ten Point
 
Dugie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Tyler
Hunt In: Ireland, TX
Default

I have an Asperger's kid, and I promise you there isn't a better golden hearted kid on the planet....as a young boy he struggled with vocabulary and social situations, he needed a set of rules for everything, it was certainly a lot of work at times. He would get overloaded from a sensory standpoint, but he was learning, cataloging and figuring it out.

The biggest thing you can do for your son is to get him into therapy, because he will learn differently and early intervention is key. Several Dr's and professionals gave us early diagnosis and outlooks that weren't always great, but I can tell you that it doesn't mean squat because the variation from kid to kid on the spectrum is so great.
Get to work with him, I get frustrated at parents who ignore or dismiss the issues because they don't want to deal with the "disappointment" or they are just ill-equipped.
I credit my wife who was a tireless learner/researcher/advocate for my son, in school with Dr's and therapist, it is a lot of time and effort, but it pays off!

Today my son is in college living on his own and is in the honors program. He isn't a typical 19 year old but he literally is the best of us. Continue to dream big for that young man, we all are different created by God for a purpose and he has one.

I would say don't let any stone go unturned, the intervention and help he gets now will pay off huge for his future. My prayers are with you guys!!
Dugie is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 01:20 PM   #23
RedBear78
Six Point
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Location: Beaumont
Hunt In: Warren,Sourlake,Angelina forest
Default

I am stepdad t a 12 year old boy with Aspergers he has never had a father figure until I came in the picture 2 years ago.He seems mostly normal most of the time but he’s a handful.Trying to reach him and connect with him is a struggle he sees people and the world very differently.Training and discipline are a real challenge he really doesn’t understand why he can’t do what he wants when he wants at any time.Once he learned about consistent consequences for bad or unacceptable behavior it was a game changer.He enjoys the outdoors in short increments he is really stuck in electronics most of the time.I started reading Bible stories to him about a year ago and the results were amazing it’s really the only thing that has connected us and has helped me introduce Jehovah and Jesus to him in an understandable way and he gets it.He remembers the stories and explains them to me weeks later.This kid can’t remember what he has for breakfast each day but he remembers the Bible stories almost perfectly.It’s got to be Holy Spirit filling in because it’s that profound.I really have to pray for patience and understanding because he really can test me,I have to remember he’s wired differently and most of the time the trouble he causes is not his fault.I’m trying to train him to identify issues by observation because he doesn’t have the normal emotional awareness of other people.This has been a hugely overwhelming but rewarding task.
RedBear78 is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 01:24 PM   #24
bullets13
Ten Point
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Fannett
Hunt In: Marion Co, Jefferson Co
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JTRichardson View Post
I don't want to say that processed foods and chemicals are the cause or contribute to the syndrome, but I'm not a scientist so I can't confirm or deny that.

I do however, think, that it has more to do with the medical community making advancements in diagnosing this type of thing.

Like ADHD - when we were younger, kids with severe ADHD were just, "bad kids" - now we know that there is a chemical imbalance causing that behavior. Maybe not the best example because we affectively use meth to treat the cause, but I think it gets my point across.
definitely.
bullets13 is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 01:30 PM   #25
Hogmauler
Ten Point
 
Hogmauler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Katy
Hunt In: Kerrville
Default

At times our son will say something so profound that it literally knocks you off your feet. And ditto what the dads above have said. Those kids are in there. They just can’t get out. And btw, they understand much more than you think they do.
Hogmauler is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 01:39 PM   #26
roberts
Ten Point
 
roberts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Austin, TX
Hunt In: Hill Country
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hogmauler View Post
At times our son will say something so profound that it literally knocks you off your feet. And ditto what the dads above have said. Those kids are in there. They just can’t get out. And btw, they understand much more than you think they do.
That is so true. My son has no filter and I have to watch what he is saying when we are around other people. There is also no volume control. He will say most things loudly...

Last edited by roberts; 06-08-2021 at 01:40 PM. Reason: forgot to add volume
roberts is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 01:46 PM   #27
Hogmauler
Ten Point
 
Hogmauler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Katy
Hunt In: Kerrville
Default

My sister in law almost got me and her husband in a fight, literally. And our son waited till Thanksgiving dinner to let the whole table know, came outta left field. He said “you made my dad mad. He took your picture and threw it across the living room”. My sister in law apologized to him but when he came out with it it was so quiet you could hear a mouse whiz on a ball of cotton!
Hogmauler is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 01:49 PM   #28
Drop Tine
Ten Point
 
Drop Tine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Montgomery, TX
Hunt In: Anywhere and anything legal
Default

When my son was first diagnosed I took it hard. I have shared that with many in the years since to help anyone else weíve come across in dealing with whatever emotions they may experience. This guy is incredibly brilliant and itís been a great journey together with all the things heís done. I have no doubt he will be another story like some of the above posted. Heís certainly not in to baseball like his dad, but he loves some hiking and fighting a good fish!




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Drop Tine is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 02:16 PM   #29
Hogmauler
Ten Point
 
Hogmauler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Katy
Hunt In: Kerrville
Default

Threads like this are always therapeutic. You realize that your not alone, that your not the only one going through this. Like cancer, heart conditions, knee replacements etc etc. it’s this inconvenient thing called “life”. Another thing I’ve experienced is that most people would always ask my wife “how are you doing” but never bothered to ask me. Like men don’t have feelings as well. To them all we think about is beer, boobs, and sausage festivals. Dang I just nailed it!
Hogmauler is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 02:34 PM   #30
Anythinghunter8
Eight Point
 
Anythinghunter8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Schulenburg
Hunt In: Flatonia
Default

Just because he does not talk does not mean he has autism. Lots of time boys are just slow talker. I have a sons one 6 and ones 4, the 4 years old talks some and just now the 6 years is saying more and more. Both boys knows there colors letters and number. Both these boys are spoiled to the max thanks to me and my wife and never have to ask for anything because we make sure they have it.
i Work offshore and last night i face time him and my 6 year old said daddy and i love u and this morning my wife sent me a video of him saying a bunch of word, it brought me to tears. Im always miss them but hearing him talk is making it even worse on me, im ready to get home now!

Kids will talk when they want to and nothing is a matter with that, the problem is DR labeling kids. We do bring both boys to speech therapy and no one up there ever said anything about them having autism. They are both loving and caring boys
Anythinghunter8 is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 02:55 PM   #31
Anythinghunter8
Eight Point
 
Anythinghunter8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Schulenburg
Hunt In: Flatonia
Default

I just re read the post i found it interesting a kid being un social is any concern. Not every body like to talk to people and stuff and some kids are just quiet. I was a quiet kid did not talk much or have a bunch of friends, i think it comes out to be a way you read people, I'm not talking or interacting because maybe you know these kids are fake and u don't have time for that. Also some kids just like being by them self or maybe only with certain people. Just because kids not a social butterfly does not mean they are autistic.
My mom and me are the same way we are not going to talk anyone unless we have to, my bother and sister will talk to any body.
When i first met my wife yeah i talked to her because i liked her but she saw how i was when we where in crowds, i just keep to my self and will only talk to her, her on the other hand she will talk to anyone.
So i have to disagree with above comments not talking and being social is not a problem every one is different and that what makes us all unique.
Anythinghunter8 is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 03:02 PM   #32
bowfishin fool
Ten Point
 
bowfishin fool's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Midland TX
Hunt In: Harper Tx, Cuero TX
Default

My wife is a pediatric occupational therapist.

She spends lots of time with all sorts of diagnoses, but Autism in particular is a large part of her caseload.

Itís amazing how much better her kiddos have done since Telehealth started! She has had to teach the parents and not work with the kids as much. Huge improvements in functionality come from the parents learning and understanding and following the program with their kids. Structure, all kids needs structure, even more so when they are on the spectrum.

Stay involved, be an advocate, you are your boys biggest/only fan, role model and guardian!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
bowfishin fool is online now   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 03:30 PM   #33
Lone_Wolf
Ten Point
 
Lone_Wolf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Hunt In: Bosque Hill McLennan Navarro Counties
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Randy View Post
My son has aspergers.

A literal card carrying genius that's wired a little different.

Reads a novel a day, loves music but hates noise.

Wouldn't trade him for the world.
I have a nephew. His parents I guess never really wanted to label him "having" anything. Super smart kid, that could read at a ridiculously early age, but has trouble in social situations and sometimes with noise and eye contact stuff that's typical of aspergers/mild autism. No doctor, but he's on the spectrum. Great kid, but he will have some growing pains. He was messing with the code to change how some video game worked the other day...lol
Lone_Wolf is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 03:46 PM   #34
Jefecinco
Six Point
 
Jefecinco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Liberty Hill and Lake Buchanan
Hunt In: Bell and Throckmorton County, NM and CO
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Randy View Post
My son has aspergers.

A literal card carrying genius that's wired a little different.

Reads a novel a day, loves music but hates noise.

Wouldn't trade him for the world.
My son also. His room is like a library. About to go off to college in Ireland.

Hardest part is the social stuff. Hard as a parent not seeing him do what other kids are doing at the same age. But he wears it like a badge, and you realize as a parent he is fine with it all and thankfully God made us all different. Like others have said also, heart of gold. Just thinks differently. Really interesting kid once you get to know him. Unfortunately most never do because of his quirks. Tells me all the time that he is the normal one and maybe we are not normal.
Jefecinco is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 03:48 PM   #35
UncleBubba
Pope & Young
 
UncleBubba's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: NE Texas
Hunt In: Dickens, Hunt, and Red River Co.
Default

I like the "Focus on the ability not on the disability!" Sends a positive message to the kids.
UncleBubba is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 04:33 PM   #36
Hogmauler
Ten Point
 
Hogmauler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Katy
Hunt In: Kerrville
Default

Our son played special olympics basketball with the Katy Wolfpack for several years. We as a society could learn so much from these people. Don’t know if you’ve ever noticed but they don’t recognize their teammates disabilities. It’s the darndest thing. They accept each other as they are.
Hogmauler is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 08:04 PM   #37
schmalzy
Eight Point
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Richmond
Hunt In: Gulf coast and VA
Default

Just want to say I deeply admire and respect each of you for your comments and insight. Loving, solid Dads, and awesome, capable, great Kids!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
schmalzy is online now   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 08:56 PM   #38
skinsfan
Eight Point
 
skinsfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Corpus Christi
Hunt In: Goliad/Medina County
Default

I was brought to tears reading this as I rocked my 2 year old to sleep. He too is a little slower, no diagnosis and I don’t think there ever will be but my wife worries. Nothing in the world makes me respect a man more than his love for his family. Sure enjoyed reading through this!
skinsfan is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 09:10 PM   #39
ShockValue
Pope & Young
 
ShockValue's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Flower Mound, Tx
Hunt In: Hill Country
Default

Interesting how TBH seems to have timely discussions on life.

My 17 year old daughter was recently diagnosed with ADHD and is going in tomorrow to hear results from Aspergers testing. She pretty much self diagnosed but wanted validation. We’ve known the “spectrum” tenancies for years but it will be good for her to know although she i has been very self aware for a couple of years.

She just graduated high school with a 4.3 GPA and is going to college at the University of Washington in the fall.

Last edited by ShockValue; 06-08-2021 at 09:13 PM.
ShockValue is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-08-2021, 11:21 PM   #40
mww982
Eight Point
 
mww982's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Keller
Hunt In: Texas, Michigan
Default

My oldest was diagnosed at 3 years old. He had delayed speech, pointing issues, echolalia, sensory issues, lined his toys up in a particular manner. Boy if you messed with the toys or moved one from the middle to the end, he would lose his mind. With what little he could talk, he could recite his alphabet at 18 mos. old.

Heís now 7 and such a sweet, smart kid. We took him to the eye doctor today and he immediately wanted to give the doc a hug (canít blame him though). Heís definitely all boy but has different interests than meZ. Loves art and music. Heís socially awkward at times but thatís what makes him special. Heís in normal classes, heís just going to be the kid that is a little different than everyone else.

Iíd love to get in his head so I could see the way he sees the world, because it is definitely different than his little brother.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
mww982 is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-09-2021, 06:44 AM   #41
Quackerbox
Pope & Young
 
Quackerbox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Magnolia
Hunt In: The woods
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JTRichardson View Post
I don't want to say that processed foods and chemicals are the cause or contribute to the syndrome, but I'm not a scientist so I can't confirm or deny that.

I do however, think, that it has more to do with the medical community making advancements in diagnosing this type of thing.

Like ADHD - when we were younger, kids with severe ADHD were just, "bad kids" - now we know that there is a chemical imbalance causing that behavior. Maybe not the best example because we affectively use meth to treat the cause, but I think it gets my point across.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Man View Post
I don't know if its just me but it seems the number of people I know that have autistic kids has grown rapidly the past 10-15 years. This has really been eye opening for me in many ways especially the past 5 years or so with regards to foods and chemicals.
Agreed.

Nearly everyone in my family along with close friends think my brothers son has Aspergers. He would read all christmas day when the rest of the kids are outside running wild. Brother and sister in law refused to have him tested and I think are in denial today. He excelled in school early was accepted in A&M engineering program and dropped out over social issues. Things have gotten really bad a few times with suicidal thoughts etc. They still refuse to do anything but medicate and talk to the church.

Quote:
Originally Posted by schmalzy View Post
Just want to say I deeply admire and respect each of you for your comments and insight. Loving, solid Dads, and awesome, capable, great Kids!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

X2!!
Quackerbox is online now   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-09-2021, 07:31 AM   #42
J Loves Huntin
Ten Point
 
J Loves Huntin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: NE Fort Worth
Hunt In: Anywhere
Default

One of my cousins and uncles who I spent a lot of time with when I was growing up are on the spectrum. Both of them are smart and gifted with incredible memories. My uncle has had an amazing career and travelled the world. Unfortunately, my cousin was in some ways left to his own devices and while he is still wicked smart he is also more likely to spend all of his time playing video games. He started playing at 5 and is now 27. The man can take apart an engine with no training but doesn’t apply himself. I love him and wish the best for him.
J Loves Huntin is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-09-2021, 11:05 AM   #43
CletusBodeen
Pope & Young
 
CletusBodeen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: West
Hunt In: On da couch
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mww982 View Post
Iíd love to get in his head so I could see the way he sees the world, because it is definitely different than his little brother.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

This is something I wish I could do as well. See things how he does so I can be a better dad to him.
CletusBodeen is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-09-2021, 11:48 AM   #44
Hogmauler
Ten Point
 
Hogmauler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Katy
Hunt In: Kerrville
Default

Eventually you will figure out how he thinks to an extent. 25 years into this and I pretty well can tell what’s going on with my son, sometimes. He went walking around the lake the other day and when he came back I noticed his pants were wet.
I said “Caleb how’d your pants get wet”? He said “I needed to go to the bathroom and couldn’t hold it so I just whizzed I’m my pants “. Me “ why didn’t you just walk off I’m the brush like I do sometimes when no one is there”? Caleb “I didn’t think of it dad”.
So I told him to change his clothes and put the wet ones in the laundry room. No need to shame him because he told me the truth. Such is the life of a special needs dad!
Hogmauler is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-09-2021, 11:53 AM   #45
roberts
Ten Point
 
roberts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Austin, TX
Hunt In: Hill Country
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CletusBodeen View Post
This is something I wish I could do as well. See things how he does so I can be a better dad to him.
You are already there on being a better Dad. Just love him and be there.

It is different raising a child on the spectrum, but you make it what it is. I have spend countless hours at therapy appointments and doctor visits. Trying to learn everything that I can. What I have found out is, that everyone child is different. Just be there for them and help them along the way. There will be battles between you and your son, and you will both learn from them.

As you learn how they think and see things, it will get better. The battles will be less, but different battles will appear. When my son was younger, it was difficult teaching him and getting him to understand. We would go back and forth and then we would both figure out how to communicate with one another and he would pick it up. Once he and I got on the same page, he would excel. There will be trying times for both of you, but you will both get there. It will take time.

And what works for one child may not work for another. This has been my experience with it all.

Do not beat yourself up. It will be a huge learning curve.

I am speaking from my personal experience. My son was diagnosed at 18 months old and I would not change him for anything. He has taught me a geat deal about being a Dad.
roberts is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-09-2021, 11:58 AM   #46
jake03
Six Point
 
jake03's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: east texas
Hunt In: backyard
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dugie View Post
I have an Asperger's kid, and I promise you there isn't a better golden hearted kid on the planet....as a young boy he struggled with vocabulary and social situations, he needed a set of rules for everything, it was certainly a lot of work at times. He would get overloaded from a sensory standpoint, but he was learning, cataloging and figuring it out.

The biggest thing you can do for your son is to get him into therapy, because he will learn differently and early intervention is key. Several Dr's and professionals gave us early diagnosis and outlooks that weren't always great, but I can tell you that it doesn't mean squat because the variation from kid to kid on the spectrum is so great.
Get to work with him, I get frustrated at parents who ignore or dismiss the issues because they don't want to deal with the "disappointment" or they are just ill-equipped.
I credit my wife who was a tireless learner/researcher/advocate for my son, in school with Dr's and therapist, it is a lot of time and effort, but it pays off!

Today my son is in college living on his own and is in the honors program. He isn't a typical 19 year old but he literally is the best of us. Continue to dream big for that young man, we all are different created by God for a purpose and he has one.

I would say don't let any stone go unturned, the intervention and help he gets now will pay off huge for his future. My prayers are with you guys!!
True story here....He's always been one of my favorite people on the planet! And genius is an understatement...

Also, my children do not have any forms of autism, but as a result of the their heart to serve others, our family has been very involved with kids, teenagers and adults with forms of Autism, Downs and other special needs. I cannot tell you all of the lessons of love and joy I personally have received from them.
jake03 is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-09-2021, 11:59 AM   #47
bullets13
Ten Point
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Fannett
Hunt In: Marion Co, Jefferson Co
Default

I've taught several throughout my teaching career.
bullets13 is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-09-2021, 12:11 PM   #48
Briar Friar
Pope & Young
 
Briar Friar's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Default

Yes. Very minor for us on our 5 yo little girl. I saw it faint and early but still present. It was hard for specialists to put her on the spectrum but there was still indicators especially speech. We have her in speech therapy through the ISD. She wont quit talking now....delightfully and insistently so. We are working on talking nice...excuse me please and thank you...I still get lots of “Daddy do this/that...now”.

Good luck MrBodeen.
Briar Friar is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-09-2021, 08:19 PM   #49
CletusBodeen
Pope & Young
 
CletusBodeen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: West
Hunt In: On da couch
Default

The school district we live in did qualify him for ECSC (PPCD) so he will get to start school as a 3 year old next school year.
He will get a lot of speech therapy.


Heís a little turkey but I wouldnít trade him for anything.
CletusBodeen is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 06-10-2021, 04:27 AM   #50
HillyWelos
Nubbin' Buck
 
HillyWelos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Location: Texas
Default

I've taught such children during my internship in the school. They're pretty smart and you almost don't have educational issues with them.
HillyWelos is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:23 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Copyright 1999-2012, TexasBowhunter.com