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Old 05-04-2018, 10:06 AM   #101
trjones87
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college is worth it. college is not worth bring 75k in debt. if i could do it again, id go to a trade school
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Old 05-04-2018, 10:08 AM   #102
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A- Degree in Economics
B- I use the basic principles
C- yes

Two of my good friends do not have degrees and both built their own successful companies from the ground up, with little to no help. Most of my college friends are on their 2nd or 3rd job and still not happy. The job I have does not require a degree although it is certainly helpful (residential/investment real estate). I also think trade school is over looked as well as going to a community college to knock out the basic courses at a fraction of the cost.

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Old 05-04-2018, 10:12 AM   #103
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Masters of business - worthless degree IMO
I was lucky not to have college debt
Most of the millionaires I know never went to college...and thats fact.

College taught me how to drink and party. I was smart enough to keep a 3. plus gpa and do all the fun stuff as well. I didn't learn anything about "business" until I hit the real world. Started in Insurance/Financial right out of college...saw that was a joke. Went in to Real Estate and had a decent run with residential as well as land and commercial property...then the recession hit. I went to the pipeline construction industry at that point. Started from the bottom and now I'm at the top. I do well, but do not believe my degree had anything to do with it. I believe hard work and determination is much more valuable than a degree regardless of what profession you choose.
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Old 05-04-2018, 10:24 AM   #104
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A. Bachelors in Industrial Management
B. No, I already had the position I am in now when I finally finished my degree.
C. I paid for school as I went and didnít finish until I was 30 with a wife and kids. I think it was worth the time and money because the added opportunities and earning potential with the degree.

I already have what I consider a successful career that makes decent money. I earned that career with a lot of hard work and starting from the bottom. Had I had the right degree I couldíve worked just as hard but be in a much better position than I am now. Also on top of that it adds a level of security knowing that I have something other than my skill set to fallback on should something crazy happen.
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Old 05-04-2018, 10:30 AM   #105
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Got my bachelors in marketing with a global supply chain emphasis.

Not directly but it definitely helped. I maybe using it in my next field though. You never know.

I was lucky enough to not have debt coming out of college but I earned it working all through junior high and high school. But I think it was well worth it. It got my foot in the door at my current company and allowed me to skip 3-4 rungs on the ladder and go straight to management. And it will allow me to lateral over if I ever swap companies. Like my dad always said if you want to make the big bucks you have to work using your head and not your muscle. And college definitely helped in that aspect.


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Old 05-04-2018, 10:32 AM   #106
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I firmly believe that you can make a good living without a college degree. But, some food for thought: 80% of millionaires have a college degree. 70% of billionaires have a college degree.
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Old 05-04-2018, 10:48 AM   #107
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A. Bachelors
B. Yes
C. Yes. I would do it again.
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Old 05-04-2018, 10:55 AM   #108
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I graduated High School and lasted maybe 6 weeks in college. While college may not be needed an education will be needed. You may be the greatest carpenter, welder, electrician etc that ever lived, but if you get injured that's it. Learn the business side of your trade. I have seen many good craftsmen go under because they could not manage the business side of things. Trust me manual labor will take its toll on your back and joints. Learn how to run the show. Don't be satisfied with just making a decent paycheck. Learn all there is to know about whatever field you decide to go in .
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Old 05-04-2018, 11:01 AM   #109
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I think in most cases, college is absolutely worth it.

But you have to weigh the quality of the school you're attending against the cost and your desired vocation upon graduation.

You go to A&M, major in Engineering or Business, you're getting a fantastic ROI with the job you'll land.

You go to TCU, major in Elementary Education, you probably won't break even if you live to 100.

I have a BS in acct, a masters in Finance, I turned 40 a month ago and could retire a year from now, though I have no desire to.
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Old 05-04-2018, 11:07 AM   #110
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College is not for everyone. I am doing it because my whole family including me were all high school drop outs. I eventually got my GED,and associates degree and went to the police academy. I have been in Law Enforcement for 9 years and a degree will let me promote. And eventually possible teach at a community college after retirement.
My wife is a teacher and a bachelors and masters in Mathematics (yuck). She only got the masters because the school district paid for it and she loves math

Is I worth it? That’s still to be determined for me. I will say this, just because you have a degree does not make you smarter. I work with prosecutors all day every day and some are just flat out dumb. The funny part is I make more than the new prosecutors with 120-180 in student loan debt
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Old 05-04-2018, 11:07 AM   #111
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I have an Associates Degree in Petroleum Engineering Technology (retired in 2015).
I didn't do work in my direct field but it did open some doors in the Petroleum Industry. I worked 17 yrs with Schlumberger and 17 yrs with Hubbell Electrical Products. Both of these companies had Pension programs which I'm very fortunate to have that income now that I'm retired. Most of my career was in sales so it was a great ride and I enjoyed most of those years.
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Old 05-04-2018, 11:12 AM   #112
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1)BBA in Finance
2) Technically, no, but I am a better business owner due to my finance and accounting background.
3) Yes it was worth it.

College is worth it if one pursues a degree that has demand in a field that requires a degree. Otherwise you will better off getting technical training or starting working right out of high school. Remember, you will need to make enough additional money from your degree to offset the cost of the degree along with the 4 or so years you aren't working full time. Today I see too many high school graduates that look at college as a 4 year delay from entering the real world.
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Old 05-04-2018, 11:17 AM   #113
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My case is probably not the norm, but here it is.
No college
6 figures
7th year in 6 figures. 10 years in the industry.


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Old 05-04-2018, 11:20 AM   #114
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaprockRoamer View Post
Currently enrolled in college at Texas Tech. I personally feel that college has turned into one of the largest financial institutions out there. I pay thousands to listen to a professor rant a rave about off topic points only to be sent home with the curriculum in order to learn it all myself. On top of that, I'm penalized when I don't show up to listen to their ranting and raving, but yet they're not teaching my anything.

As far as being 100 percent a necessity for our youth, I have to disagree. I struggle with this daily due to an autistic child living at home. He's an awesome kid and very intelligent, but I don't believe college is going to be the right choice for him. (Thank the Lord I still have a decade to work this out.)

I understand your point about how it "molds" us, but I have to admit, my military service did that much more adequately than college will ever be able to do.

Is it a right of passage? For the elitists out there, whose most significant hurdle in life will be completing college, I believe so, but not everyone. Please understand, I'm not pointing fingers at anyone, but do not believe it is realistic to paint this picture in one broad stroke.

I don't believe college is an absolute necessity, but honestly believe it opens doors that would otherwise be closed. I feel that college definitely gives your future employers the sense that you have the ability to stick through with something you started. If it wasn't required for the career I hope to pursue, I would utilize my time in some other fashion.

Getting off topic here. Have you folks looked into ketogenic diets for autistic children. Amazing results on speech, movement and seizures.


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Old 05-04-2018, 11:28 AM   #115
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I would say leave up to your kids, not everyone is college material, I wasn't. I went to TSTC just to get a certificate for something I was doing straight out of high school. I have made a very good living, even was sent to Saudi because of my skill set. That being said both my daughter were college people both have bachelor degrees and one is going for her master. When they get a little older you will be able to tell the ones that will want to further their education and the ones that aren't. I will say this every college student should have a vested interest in their education, dad shouldn't foot the whole bill.
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Old 05-04-2018, 11:28 AM   #116
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BS and MS in Biology
Use some of it every week
I went back in the late 80s/early 90s and commuted to UTSA. I mowed grass and lived at home, so I was able to complete it without debt. We are putting a son through Sam Houston these days and the cost is so high, not sure a student could self-pay as you go.

All that said, the TIME spent in college was worth it. It gave me a broader perspective on life and careers, so that I had a better head on my shoulders--not just book smarts stuff when I got out.

I tell all three of my sons this, "the degree or tech school training/certification may get you your first job--but it is your attitude, work ethic, and drive that determines the rest of your career--oh, and pray lots".

Just my opinion.
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Old 05-04-2018, 11:55 AM   #117
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Todayís generation will have to have a degree. It is the equivalent as to having a high school diploma 30 years ago. Next thing to come will be everyone has to have a masters degree to do any good in the world. Depending on the background and up-bringing, some people just donít need it. Iím going to college because I have to, but it is a back-up plan as I have my own company. Some kids need college because it is a wake up call to the real world, and some are still lost when they graduate as well, so I believe that it has a lot to do with the work ethic and the attitude they have towards work to determine wether itís needed or not!


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Old 05-04-2018, 11:57 AM   #118
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A. BBA Accounting
B. Yes. I work as an accountant
C. I've more than doubled my income 6 yrs after graduating. Went up by 30% out of the gate after graduation so yes definitely worth it. I borrowed 100% and I would not recommend that to anyone. But even still I would say it was worth it.
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Old 05-04-2018, 11:58 AM   #119
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I have a buddy that graduated with a philosophy degree or something similarly worthless, drove a Dr. Pepper truck for awhile, and then married the daughter of a billionaire. He met her in college.

Worth it.
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Old 05-04-2018, 11:59 AM   #120
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbhunting39 View Post
Other than the experience, College is basically paying for specialized knowledge which you could get on you own for free from any library or the Internet.
College is a great business model. Very profitable
1st person in my family to graduate High School
No college only a HSD.
Business owner.
Last real job I had my salary was over 300k a year.
I would hire someone with real world experience over anyone coming out of college.
I have seen both out in the field and the experience always wins out.




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Another question for you. Who would you be more likely to hire.

A and M grad with high book smarts and low common sense, knows little about the job he is applying for?

Sam Houston grad with average book smarts, high levels of common sense, and a knack for the job he is applying for?




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Old 05-04-2018, 12:05 PM   #121
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Quote:
Originally Posted by justindiehl7 View Post
Another question for you. Who would you be more likely to hire.

A and M grad with high book smarts and low common sense, knows little about the job he is applying for?

Sam Houston grad with average book smarts, high levels of common sense, and a knack for the job he is applying for?

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The issue is that the stuff you're implying can be hard to judge in an interview, and many companies that interview at A&M just don't interview at Sam Houston at all. I was on the hiring committee at a previous firm and when times were booming, we'd offer 10 spots to Aggies, 10 spots to Longhorns, 5 spots to Baylor, and 1 spot to Tech. Would extend additional offers based on acceptances, but generally in the same ratio. When workload slowed down, they'd just nix the Tech spot altogether (no recruiting there) and cut the other spots down by 1/3.

If you're talking about making an experienced hire, almost every would-be employer will value experience and know-how over a particular degree. I'm talking purely from a college recruitment standpoint.
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Old 05-04-2018, 12:10 PM   #122
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BitBackShot View Post
The issue is that the stuff you're implying can be hard to judge in an interview, and many companies that interview at A&M just don't interview at Sam Houston at all. I was on the hiring committee at a previous firm and when times were booming, we'd offer 10 spots to Aggies, 10 spots to Longhorns, 5 spots to Baylor, and 1 spot to Tech. Would extend additional offers based on acceptances, but generally in the same ratio. When workload slowed down, they'd just nix the Tech spot altogether (no recruiting there) and cut the other spots down by 1/3.



If you're talking about making an experienced hire, almost every would-be employer will value experience and know-how over a particular degree. I'm talking purely from a college recruitment standpoint.


I agree. Iíve got one more year on my construction degree with a minor is business. I also run my own landscape company working 50+ hours a week from February til September. I have a couple of good buddies that work their tail off and come from technical and common sense families and I canít hardly get them to come help me at 15 an hour. The ones that are worth hiring usually have a good plan and a job lined up within the first two years of school, then you have to weed through graduates to find a dirty diamond that needs some polishing, again this is from my personal experience, and my buddies in my degree field!


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Old 05-04-2018, 12:12 PM   #123
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Depends.
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Old 05-04-2018, 12:12 PM   #124
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One difference today from when I was in school is that many of the best high schools offer Advanced Placement courses that give students college credit. Many students enter college with almost a year worth of college credits they will not have to pay for. These start with pre-AP classes in lower grade levels, then those who are successful can get into the AP classes. Pick your a high school with a good AP program if you have a choice.

Another way to cut college costs is to open and contribute to savings programs like the Texas Guaranteed Tuition Plan. You can contribute by making installment payments or a lump sum. The money can be used for any trade school or college. I bought these for both of my sons, who are now out of college. You will have to forego spending on other priorities to pay for these.


Many colleges provide academic scholarships that are very generous. Some are based on the PreSAT test, rather than the SAT. Some are based on the SAT and/or the ACT, two different tests offered in the junior year. For example, Texas Tech in the past offered a 5 year full ride if your ACT was high enough. Many Texas schools, like A&M, Baylor, and Southwestern offer generous academic scholarships. Other schools do not offer many academic scholarships. Music/band/cheerleading scholarships are also available at some schools. Some schools offer jobs for students to help pay expenses.

Community colleges offer cheaper tuition, and many will allow a student to transfer into a university with high enough grades. Living at home and getting community college hours is a good way to save money.

The cost of college and graduate school is so much higher than my era (1970s), I am not sure what I would do today. High school students are often too young to know what occupation they want to pursue. Many will change their minds and careers several times.

A friend of mine has a BS in Biology from UT and an MS from Midwestern in "Spiderology". Eventually, he went to work for his father-in law in the oil and gas drilling business which he later bought out. He now is retired, and owns a 1,000 acre ranch from profits from selling the business years ago. He taught himself the business.

The Chief Justice of the US Supreme Court has a "worthless" history degree. Jim Henson probably did not need to go to puppet college to be sucessful. The UT Chancellor Admiral Mc Raven obtained a UT journalism degree before he became a Navy Seal. Some of those liberal arts graduates do pretty well.

Finding work you enjoy doing is the most important thing to me, but as the Jethro Tull song goes "Nothing Is Easy".
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Old 05-04-2018, 12:13 PM   #125
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Depends.


Wrong thread? I think this was for the GOF thread lmao


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Old 05-04-2018, 12:13 PM   #126
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I find this topic interesting and have enjoyed the thread. A couple of things to think about.

1. I think most, not all, but most will agree that college was worth it for them, if they went 10 to 60 years ago. At that time, it did not cost the same percentage of household income that it does now.
2. The price of college varies dramatically right now. So some are probably still worth it, while some may have priced themselves out of the market.

Take a degree at TCU right now. Over $200k. Does not matter if you can pay for it or have to get a loan, it is still over $200k. If you took that $200k and invested it when your kid was 18 and it grew compounded at 10 percent a year for 32 years. They could retire at 50 with $4.2 million dollars.

I went to college and it was worth it for me, but I do think many of the larger colleges are starting to get to the price point that it is hard to justify from a financial position.

I learned nothing in the classes that helped me at all in the real work world, but my network of friends I met in college have been very beneficial to my career.
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Old 05-04-2018, 12:37 PM   #127
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BitBackShot View Post
I have a buddy that graduated with a philosophy degree or something similarly worthless, drove a Dr. Pepper truck for awhile, and then married the daughter of a billionaire. He met her in college.

Worth it.



I think what some people are forgetting is is the social aspect. Moving out of your parents house at 18 and living in an entire community where EVERYONE is near your age really gives you an opportunity to learn how to be social. There is a huge social aspect to college. One of the most common overlooked key indicators of success is social skills. Not intelligence or education, but the ability to get people to like you. That is something that is difficult to measure and is a huge positive benefit of leaving home and going to school full time with complete strangers in a new environment.

Even though I don't directly use my degree anymore the jobs that I did have opened the door.

Plus, those on here that made good without a degree have pretty much all stated that they started at the bottom and worked their way up, and/or work in a blue collar profession where experience matters more than book learnin'. I knew by the time I was in kindergarten earning a living in the Texas heat was not an option for me.
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Old 05-04-2018, 12:56 PM   #128
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Quote:
Originally Posted by justindiehl7 View Post
Another question for you. Who would you be more likely to hire.

A and M grad with high book smarts and low common sense, knows little about the job he is applying for?

Sam Houston grad with average book smarts, high levels of common sense, and a knack for the job he is applying for?




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High Common sense would always win out. High common sense means good problem solving abilities and self thinkers, meaning you do not have to micro manage all the time and can spend your time focus big on your job and not theirs. People with high common sense are usually very self motivated as well. IMO


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Old 05-04-2018, 12:59 PM   #129
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A: Master's
B: Yes... every day.
C: Absolutely without question.

A Bachelor's degree from an accredited university is the first required step for licensure as a PE, so it was not optional for me.
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Old 05-04-2018, 01:01 PM   #130
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Bachelors in civil engineering, I use about 5%-10% of my degree since I mainly do mechanical design or other random things. Networking in school was one of the biggest assets I'm thankful for. It's definitely helped me get a good job and a make pretty decent money. I put myself through school over 5 years with 3 summers and dual credit in HS so thankfully no debt. I was tempted to go for my masters but I was tired of the endless assignments and being broke.

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Old 05-04-2018, 01:11 PM   #131
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A: High School


B: N/A


C: N/A
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Old 05-04-2018, 01:19 PM   #132
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Quote:
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Degree yes- however you don't make the decision on whether your kids go to school or not. You can decide to support them on whatever you wish. I have one that is not going and another that is. I would imagine one will make more money than the other probably doing less work
There is a lot of truth in this and parents would be well served to think about what Glen is saying.

To start off, bachelors/master degree for me. No I don't use it really, but I am compensated extra for it. I do believe it has assisted me with getting hired and promoted in my job. For some reason I've been able to fool people into thinking I was half way intelligent since I have degrees, lol.

To Glen's point, we live in the era of the helicopter parent. Its friggin out of control. I have a 14yo and 16yo. I know parents who's 7th graders are already taking the SAT/ACT. These same parents monitor their kids daily grades in almost real time, literally. Schools have a web based grade monitoring system available to parents which allows them to see grades as soon as they are posted. My 16yo just got asked to join the National Honor Society this year. I'm very proud of her accomplishment. You know how many times I've checked my kids grades online, not one time. I tell them its their job to keep their grades up and to complete homework/assignments. My understanding with them is that I will deal with them if their report cards show that they haven't been doing so.

My son also plays baseball. Again, great example of helicopter parenting at its finest. Little Johnny has to have a hitting coach, pitching coach, fielding coach, $300 bats, they video every at bat as if Little Johnny is playing in the World Series. Mom and Dad hold their breath and throw a fit when Little Johnny makes an error. My son is probably (arguably) the best player on his 14u select team. You know what, good for him. If he wasn't, its not the end of the world. He swings whatever bat I buy him that was last year's model, is on clearance, and typically under $100. He got there by natural ability and the hard work we put in together outside of practice. My advice to him has always been, I hope you become as great a player as you want some day. In the mean time, enjoy yourself, have fun, work hard, and God will guide you where he wants you to be.

My point to all of this is, as Glen said, its up to the child at the end of the day. I'm a proponent of a traditional college education. It was one of the best experiences of my life in so many ways. My wife and I paid off $30k of her college debt the first 7 years we were full time employees. It sucked, but in the grand scheme of things it was not a big deal. I'd gladly do it again. My wife and I will have two years of college funded for both of our kids by the time they graduate. Thankfully we did the Texas Tomorrow Fund. My daughter is going the dual credit route starting next year, so she will have a year of college knocked out when she graduates. Again, this was her decision and we helped guide her based on her future desires, which is to attend college. If my son were to decide he didn't want to attend college and would rather learn a trade, fine by me. Its their life at the end of the day and they will have to live with the decisions they make. All we as parents can do is support them in their endeavors and to make sure they are considering all sides of the situation.

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Old 05-04-2018, 01:26 PM   #133
TexasArchery_27
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One cool thing I've seen advertised on 380 near Princeton H/s, is a "Free" associates degree upon graduation. Whenever I was taking community college classes, there were a few high schoolers in the same physics class. I think it's a wonderful opportunity, and if it's free there is absolutely no reason not to take full advantage of 2 free degrees.
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Old 05-04-2018, 01:31 PM   #134
Gummi Bear
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A: what is your highest level of education?



B: For those of you with degrees, do you directly use your degree in your field?



C: given your income vs college debt (if any), or the overall expense in general, was your time in college worth it in the big picture ?




A - some college. I dropped out before my senior year. I was studying to be a wildlife biologist. I got a job as an electrician, and after a couple of years in the trade, enrolled in apprenticeship school. I graduated at the top of my class

B - college degree doesnít apply. My education from apprenticeship school, I use every single day. I do use what I learned in college to manage my lease, and have in depth conversations with the local wildlife biologist about management strategies.

C - I paid off my college debt while I was in apprenticeship school. My company helped with apprenticeship. If I got straight Aís, they paid 90%, Bís they paid 80% and so forth. I kept straight A average, and it cost me next to nothing. I set it up so it came out of my paycheck, so I never missed those dollars.

I advanced in the trade while in school, got my Journeyman, and later my Masters license. I ran work, then spent several years estimating, which taught me a whole bunch about not only how to quantify materials, but also understand the overhead and general conditions that it takes to run a job, and ultimately a company.

Now, Iím a project manager. Basically, I run jobs alongside my superintendent, and I am responsible for making sure it comes in at or under budget. In the evening, I teach at the same apprenticeship school where I attended. I believe in the program, and really enjoy helping students on their way to a better career.

I firmly believe that skilled trades are going to be the next big earners in the not too distant future. As the Baby Boomers retire, there is a huge gap in skilled people, and supply and demand is gonna come into play.





I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately...

Henry David Thoreau
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Old 05-04-2018, 01:40 PM   #135
BBReezen
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Bachelors in Animal Science

No, work for a industrial equipment service company as service manager now in our territory office here. Started as a part time job in college and through experience gained through working in different parts of the company and field work I am at the level I am in. Degree has really nothing to do with what I do other than some of the core principles get used and special knowledge from Major classes help with discussions with customers and processes of their everyday operations.

It was worth it to me because it was a goal of mine and nobody can take it away. Of course $250 a month goes to loan payments but we are on the downhill side of that.

I too am a firm believer that college education helps for a lot of folks if they are exposed to the right field to get their interest and a lot of careers wouldn’t be possible without one. But there other careers that one is not required to be successful. My boss does not have a college degree, even though he was situated to go pre med and I believe he could have been a very good doctor, life gotnin his way at a young age and he had to go straight to work and he is very intelligent and a key player in our companies success. All of his success with our company came from experience and self teaching of our trade.

I will highly recommend it to my kids when they are old enough but I will be just as happy if they aquire skill and make a good living doing that.
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Old 05-04-2018, 02:33 PM   #136
Backwoods101
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Lol
X2
Worked my way up without any degrees and bring home more than 95% of my coworkers that have a college education and wouldn't want the responsibility/headache that the other 5% are blessed with daily
Not to mention its going to take the 5% that now make 10k a year more than me @ 40 years to catch up due to the amount of money I made while they were in college.
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Old 05-04-2018, 02:43 PM   #137
stickbowcoop
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A- Associates in CAD/CAM and Bachelors in Electrical Engineering
B- Yes I use my degree, plus I could not even get my job without an engineering degree (my company requires it).
C- I have student loans from engineering degree because I went back as an adult and graduated 5 years ago. I make more yearly (well when not on unpaid sick leave) than my total debt so that is a plus I guess. I would never make this salary with my past work experiences. In my current situation this debt is scary however because I am 46 and have not had a good recovery from a 3rd surgery and I am barely mobile. So I have no idea what my future holds.
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Old 05-04-2018, 02:47 PM   #138
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I have a buddy that graduated with a philosophy degree or something similarly worthless, drove a Dr. Pepper truck for awhile, and then married the daughter of a billionaire. He met her in college.

Worth it.
Not necessarily, I had a similar buddy we would rag about marring into money and he always said that it is the hardest money he has ever had to work for Remember, the future FIL could say welcome to the family or now she is your problem! Good Luck
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Old 05-04-2018, 02:51 PM   #139
Death from Above
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If only a monetary measure is used to evaluate the benefits of a degree, then the results may be a bit flawed.

I have an undergrad and working on a grad degree. I do not ever see a time in which I stop pursuing knowledge regardless of how it helps in a day to day job.
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Old 05-04-2018, 03:03 PM   #140
TX03RUBI
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If Iím paying for it Iíll definitely make that decision for them.
Lol how are you going to pay for them to not go to school? My grandpa thought he was going to make that decision for me. I had a couple hundred acres, all the farm equipment, and a decent sized trust on the line. I told him to shove every bit of it when he thought he was going to tell me what I had to do with my life.
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Old 05-04-2018, 03:05 PM   #141
Jamesdad07
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BS of Pharmacy Did that for 20 years but walked away from it last May to start flipping houses. I get more satisfaction now then I ever did working as a pharmacist. Just paid a plumber 7700 for a 8 hours on Tuesday, so no you dont need a degree to be successful.


I know thatís right! I am a GC and ever time I write a check to one of my plumbers I consider urging my son to open a plumbing company.


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Old 05-04-2018, 03:18 PM   #142
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A.) Only 1 yr of college
B.) Obviously no degree
C.) I was lucky enough to have a handful of different men show me the basics of remodeling and taught myself the rest by trial and error. When my son was born, ( I was 19 ) I opened my own handyman company, then started doing remodeling jobs hands on. Iím now a general contractor and make quite a bit more than my friends with degrees. When I would make a mistake that cost me money, one of those men would say, ďThink of it like this, youíre paying for your education. Some people do it through books and tuition, youíre doing it by these costly lessons.Ē Iím fairly certain my son isnít cut out for college. If he wants to go, I will certainly support him. I would much rather him get up every day and do something that he loves than go get a degree, and work a job he doesnít like just because itís ďthe normĒ and he feels like he has to.


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Old 05-04-2018, 04:12 PM   #143
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Myself- No. Dad offered to pay for it but After 12 years of school I was finished. But I do make a pretty good living in the petrochem industry.

Children- 3 of the 4 have degrees and are happy with their jobs and making good money. The son not working his degreed field but the degree helped get the job. I helped two of them but felt they would be better students if they knew they would have a little debt at the end. The third blew it when she said "If I can't go to Baylor then I just won't go". Ended up her and hubby paid for it. The fourth child had my attitude as a youngster but is making her way up the ladder in her chosen field through grit and determination.

One last thought: I work alongside several people who have degrees, one a doctorate, but left their chosen profession due to lack of advancement opportunities, low pay in that profession and other reasons.

Last edited by locolobo; 05-04-2018 at 04:15 PM.
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Old 05-04-2018, 04:35 PM   #144
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I have 2 masters degrees, and Iíll be the first one to say that college is not for everyone. That being said, the statistics still show that college educated people as a whole tend to make more money in their lifetime, have lower levels of depression, stay married longer, etc.

Have your kids calculate the potential Return On Investment (ROI) of the degree that they want to pursue. If they donít know what ROI is, make them get a finance degree or at least minor in it!

If they want to major in a degree with a low or no ROI, tell them to go pay for it. If they actually have a true passion for that degree, they will find a way to make it work.

Remember, your kids can get a loan from college, but you canít get a loan for retirement.
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Old 05-04-2018, 07:30 PM   #145
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Agree with many responses and laugh at a few?

Depends on what career you want to be in? If no degree then you are NOT even in consideration for many professional careers. My degree was from Texas Tech in Psychology and I have had careers as a LEO, Paramedic, Biotech Sales and Real Estate land sales. Times are continually changing and as an example many entry level LEO positions require some college hours or military service that will substitute if no college hours.

Example of Real Estate...the Texas Real Estate Commission will specify how many hours of RE courses one needs to take based on education. When I first got licensed in RE to pursue land sales, my courses were much less than those with no college hours?

Get the degree or at least some hours. It reflects to many employers that an applicant can LEARN and has the aptitude for entry level positions in the very least. There are very few shortcuts to obtaining the $$ you may want to ultimately achieve based on what YOU would enjoy doing and getting paid what meets your financial expectations. Also...learn to spell and be able to write (seriously, amazed at how basic this is but some are so lacking in these basic skills)....one of the first things employers will FLAG on resumes...just saying from experience over many years. Good luck!!!!!
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Old 05-04-2018, 08:59 PM   #146
bowhntrmatt
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I got my bachelors in business.
I mixed community college/online/night classes and was able to work full time through college and, with some parental assistance, graduated debt-free.

I worked in the HVAC industry through college and realized that it was a great business so thatís what I stuck with. The first time I broke $150k was the year I turned 24.

Though my degree is not necessary for my job, I highly value everything I learned in college, and apply those principles in life every day. I think the work ethic I had to learn in order to maintain full time employment and classes was one of the most important things I gained in college.
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Old 05-04-2018, 09:03 PM   #147
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Plain and simple. Yes.
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Old 05-06-2018, 07:47 AM   #148
grizzman
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A) BS-Accounting, some grad school
B) Yes, every day as a Controller.
C) Absolutely. Passing the CPA exam helped also.

I'll say that I was lucky to have a trade as a backup. I grew up working with my stepfather installing floors and suspended ceilings. Also the military gave me training and experience that I couldn't have gotten elsewhere.

Last edited by grizzman; 05-06-2018 at 07:53 AM.
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Old 05-06-2018, 07:57 AM   #149
CaprockRoamer
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Getting off topic here. Have you folks looked into ketogenic diets for autistic children. Amazing results on speech, movement and seizures.


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No sir, can't say that I have. Thank you kindly for the info though.
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Old 05-06-2018, 08:18 AM   #150
grizzman
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It is extremely expensive. Both of my kids have to have degrees to do what they want to do. What chaps my butt is the struggle my son has particularly gone through with Foreign Teachers at Texas A&M. No offense but......Two in particular....one from Iran and one from China. The kids cannot even understand what the Professors are saying. One of the classes had around 300 students in it. All the kids are looking around at one another. A&M will gladly take your money but they cannot even hire Professors that can communicate with the student body properly. I hate that I pay for that but it may not be better elsewhere either.
I was taking classes at the University of New Orleans and ran into this. They wanted me to take additional undergrad classes prior to acceptance into grad school. One professor I couldn't understand at all. I finally got sick of it and applied to grad school at SLU in Hammond and started directly into graduate level classes. I could also understand my instructors.
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