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Old 05-02-2020, 12:51 PM   #1
4wheels
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Default Murder hornet

https://dnyuz.com/2020/05/02/trackin...north-america/


Yikes.
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Old 05-02-2020, 01:19 PM   #2
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I've seen the black and yeller hornets of N. America. Have seen the hornets passing through here in Texas as well. Even seen the hives hanging in trees 50 foot off the ground up north. And have seen hornets about the same size as in that pic. But to have an additional species is not good. Honey bees in N. America are having a hard enough time as it is without something hunting them down and killing a nest out.


Some of the beer joints and bars up north have hives collected during the winter hanging above the bars as conversation pieces. It's easy to collect them during the winter as they are all inside and inactive. All you gotta do is plug the bottom hole.
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Old 05-02-2020, 01:24 PM   #3
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I’ve seen videos of those things in Japan - terrifying. I wonder how in the heck they got to Canada and Washington state?
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Old 05-02-2020, 02:41 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by jerp View Post
Iíve seen videos of those things in Japan - terrifying. I wonder how in the heck they got to Canada and Washington state?
Trade winds...ÖÖ
I may have to double up, on my Epi-Pen dosage...Ö..
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Old 05-02-2020, 03:11 PM   #5
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We actually dont want honey bees.. they're like the hogs of the pollinator world. They hurt natural pollinators.
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Old 05-02-2020, 03:26 PM   #6
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Iíve seen videos of those things in Japan - terrifying. I wonder how in the heck they got to Canada and Washington state?
You ever been up that way? Lots of asians made themselves at home there, probably found there way over as an exotic pet would be my guess.
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Old 05-02-2020, 03:32 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Hooverfb View Post
We actually dont want honey bees.. they're like the hogs of the pollinator world. They hurt natural pollinators.
Explain

I thought honey bees were a natural, beneficial species and here you say they are invasive?
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Old 05-02-2020, 04:42 PM   #8
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I thought honey bees were a natural, beneficial species and here you say they are invasive?
Thats what i was always told as well. However They are not native to the u.s. and compete with native bees. Google makes it a point to note that white people brought them over.
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Old 05-02-2020, 04:57 PM   #9
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Thats what i was always told as well. However They are not native to the u.s. and compete with native bees. Google makes it a point to note that white people brought them over.
True story. Honey bees are not native to North America. But since they helped displace native bees they have become the main pollinator here.Now they are in danger of being displaced themselves.
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Old 05-03-2020, 07:04 PM   #10
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Love how the media said in other Countries they kill 50 people each year!!!

I had to shake my head...Let me google how many people die here each year from bee stings.. I bet it's more than 50

between 58 and 62 in the USA.. Less than I thought.
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Old 05-03-2020, 07:11 PM   #11
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Trade winds...ÖÖ
I may have to double up, on my Epi-Pen dosage...Ö..
Yikes, I hope you won't need it.
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Old 05-03-2020, 07:34 PM   #12
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Two of the worst wasps on the planet from what I have gotten out of watching documentaries, are some wasp from Australia, naturally, everything over there is bad. Then those murder hornets from Japan. I don't remember which is considered worse, both very bad, very aggressive.

I have also been told by my father in law, who is not always exactly correct. That there is some large wasp that burrows holes in trees up in the north west, that is bad news. It's supposed to be very large, makes holes up in the tops of pine trees or other tall timber and not something you ever want to make mad. He used to be a logger up in Oregon many years ago. He said those wasps were not something you ever wanted to run into when you were way up a tree, cutting the top or even cutting a tree down, then cutting or moving it around.
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Old 05-03-2020, 07:55 PM   #13
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Tracker Jackers. Government engineered killers.
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Old 05-03-2020, 08:09 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by BTLowry View Post
Explain

I thought honey bees were a natural, beneficial species and here you say they are invasive?
https://www.wired.com/2015/04/youre-...ng-wrong-bees/
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Old 05-03-2020, 08:34 PM   #15
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Thanks for the link, interesting
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Old 05-04-2020, 12:10 PM   #16
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This . .
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Old 05-04-2020, 12:44 PM   #17
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Bees have found a way to kill them. They create a ball of heat by covering the hornet, vibrating, and basically burn the hornet to death since a bee can take more heat.
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Old 05-04-2020, 01:40 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by Man View Post
Thats what i was always told as well. However They are not native to the u.s. and compete with native bees. Google makes it a point to note that white people brought them over.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hooverfb View Post
We actually dont want honey bees.. they're like the hogs of the pollinator world. They hurt natural pollinators.
Quote:
Originally Posted by locolobo View Post
True story. Honey bees are not native to North America. But since they helped displace native bees they have become the main pollinator here.Now they are in danger of being displaced themselves.
Is there any time frame where a non-indigenous species becomes considered as native? Yes Honeybees were brought to North America but they've been here now for 400 years. All plants and animals were "invasive" at some point, that's the goal of any species...to grow and spread.

I'd be curious to know how many of our "native" bee species hitched a ride over here before we started writing things down in books.
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Old 05-04-2020, 01:49 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by RiverRat1 View Post
Love how the media said in other Countries they kill 50 people each year!!!

I had to shake my head...Let me google how many people die here each year from bee stings.. I bet it's more than 50

between 58 and 62 in the USA.. Less than I thought.
Donít forget most of those bee sting deaths gonna be counted as Corona...
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Old 05-04-2020, 01:55 PM   #20
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Is there any time frame where a non-indigenous species becomes considered as native? Yes Honeybees were brought to North America but they've been here now for 400 years. All plants and animals were "invasive" at some point, that's the goal of any species...to grow and spread.

I'd be curious to know how many of our "native" bee species hitched a ride over here before we started writing things down in books.
So when Domestic and exotic sheep eliminate Bighorn sheep, we should relabel sheep, goats etc native? Or when pheasants(what we are have done) eventually wipeout Lessor Prairie chicken etc.

Basically what you are advocating.

Last edited by Texans42; 05-04-2020 at 01:59 PM.
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Old 05-04-2020, 01:55 PM   #21
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We’ve reached level 5 of jumanji in 2020.
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Old 05-04-2020, 02:14 PM   #22
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The world is flat . .
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Old 05-04-2020, 03:05 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by Texans42 View Post
So when Domestic and exotic sheep eliminate Bighorn sheep, we should relabel sheep, goats etc native? Or when pheasants(what we are have done) eventually wipeout Lessor Prairie chicken etc.

Basically what you are advocating.
After they've been here for 400-500 years?...yeah, maybe. I wasn't necessarily advocating for it, rather I was posing a food for thought question. There were a few comments dismissing the honeybee as an invasive species and I was simply highlighting that most, if not all, species establish their "native" habitat by invading it at some point. We've just drawn arbitrary lines in the sand as to what we classify as native.

Last edited by JonBoy; 05-04-2020 at 03:08 PM.
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Old 05-04-2020, 03:23 PM   #24
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That murder hornet sounds and looks like a bad witch! Terrible news for the beekeepers too, and it can stay up in the PNW with Sasquatch!
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Old 05-04-2020, 03:58 PM   #25
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Bees have found a way to kill them. They create a ball of heat by covering the hornet, vibrating, and basically burn the hornet to death since a bee can take more heat.
Bee's in asia have but those over here might be SOL until they can figure that out lol
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Old 05-04-2020, 03:58 PM   #26
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.
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Old 05-04-2020, 03:59 PM   #27
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Bee's in asia have but those over here might be SOL until they can figure that out lol
They better be quick learners!
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Old 05-04-2020, 04:17 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by Kingfisher789 View Post
Donít forget most of those bee sting deaths gonna be counted as Corona...

Nah, they need to hype this since the Rona didnít keep us inside enough. Might need the run on toilet paper- a swarm of those might just scare the **** out of you.


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Old 05-04-2020, 04:18 PM   #29
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After they've been here for 400-500 years?...yeah, maybe. I wasn't necessarily advocating for it, rather I was posing a food for thought question. There were a few comments dismissing the honeybee as an invasive species and I was simply highlighting that most, if not all, species establish their "native" habitat by invading it at some point. We've just drawn arbitrary lines in the sand as to what we classify as native.
400 years isn’t much of evolutional time frame, infact it’s a needle point measurement on a mile. The example you are looking for 100000’s of years, where natural flora evolves with the animal/insect etc.

What did the Europeans bring with them to eat? How many islands and lands did the Europeans dump domestic live stock for further lay over food ? Yes sheep, goats, hogs etc they have been here for a long time.

Europeans bees(honey or wool-carder) in general are an invasion species, but people dismiss it as such due to honey production and ignorance to its relationship to the native flora here in the US. Lazy arse pollinators compared to native.
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Old 05-04-2020, 04:47 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by Texans42 View Post
400 years isn’t much of evolutional time frame, infact it’s a needle point measurement on a mile. The example you are looking for 100000’s of years, where natural flora evolves with the animal/insect etc.

What did the Europeans bring with them to eat? How many islands and lands did the Europeans dump domestic live stock for further lay over food ? Yes sheep, goats, hogs etc they have been here for a long time.

Europeans bees(honey or wool-carder) in general are an invasion species, but people dismiss it as such due to honey production and ignorance to its relationship to the native flora here in the US. Lazy arse pollinators compared to native.
As inefficient as they may be honey bees make up for their efficiency with range and sheer numbers. As an example, a single Mason bee pollinates 20X better than a single honey bee, but honey bees cover 2700X the area with 50,000 members per hive.

Either way, for the sake of the honey bee, that the murder hornet doesn't land yet another punch to the honey bee's population. Dealing with varroa, neonics has already proven to be more than they can handle.

Last edited by JonBoy; 05-04-2020 at 05:06 PM.
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Old 05-04-2020, 05:12 PM   #31
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As inefficient as they may be honey bees make up for their efficiency with range and sheer numbers. As an example, a single Mason bee pollinates 20X better than a single honey bee, but honey bees cover 2700X the area with 50,000 members per hive.

Either way, for the sake of the honey bee, that the murder hornet doesn't land yet another punch to the honey bee's population. Dealing with varroa, neonics has already proven to be more than they can handle.
I’ll take mason and bumble over Honey all day. Just like id take lessor prairie chicken over a pheasant or Bighorn sheep over a Suffolk everyday. Our system evolved with those species
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Old 05-04-2020, 05:13 PM   #32
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Pretty cool how they are fighting it.

ďAs soon as they see the hornet coming to the water source to drink, the guy jumps out with a net, and he grabs it. Then, ever so carefully, he ties a string on it and lets it go.
ďThereís a spotter watching it now with binoculars, and he watches this thing as it flies, because obviously itís going to fly back to the nest. When they find it, they mark where the nest is.
ďAnd at night they come back and with a flame-thrower, pretty much go at it, just follow them back to their base camp, and when they least expect it, boom, go after them.Ē
https://nypost.com/2020/05/03/asias-...coast-experts/
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Old 05-04-2020, 05:13 PM   #33
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Im also curious why the are called "Murder Hornets"? Is that a media thing?

Aren't these the Giant Japanese Hornets?
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Old 05-04-2020, 05:23 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by RifleBowPistol View Post
Two of the worst wasps on the planet from what I have gotten out of watching documentaries, are some wasp from Australia, naturally, everything over there is bad. Then those murder hornets from Japan. I don't remember which is considered worse, both very bad, very aggressive.

I have also been told by my father in law, who is not always exactly correct. That there is some large wasp that burrows holes in trees up in the north west, that is bad news. It's supposed to be very large, makes holes up in the tops of pine trees or other tall timber and not something you ever want to make mad. He used to be a logger up in Oregon many years ago. He said those wasps were not something you ever wanted to run into when you were way up a tree, cutting the top or even cutting a tree down, then cutting or moving it around.
I don't know how the Tarantula Hawk stacks up on aggression, but it's sting is comparable with anything on earth.
Never been stung, but have seen 2 people(different occasions) stung by one.
It's not your typical reaction.
You lose your breath, and pretty much the ability to react.
Make a grown man cry fo sho.
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Old 05-04-2020, 05:27 PM   #35
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I don't know how the Tarantula Hawk stacks up on aggression, but it's sting is comparable with anything on earth.
Never been stung, but have seen 2 people(different occasions) stung by one.
It's not your typical reaction.
You lose your breath, and pretty much the ability to react.
Make a grown man cry fo sho.
The Tarantula hawk ranks tied for #1 with the Bullet Ant and Warrior Wasp for the worst pain produced from a bug sting
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Old 05-04-2020, 05:29 PM   #36
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Im also curious why the are called "Murder Hornets"? Is that a media thing?

Aren't these the Giant Japanese Hornets?
They murder bees. Or best word the media could come up with.
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Old 05-04-2020, 05:31 PM   #37
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They murder bees. Or best word the media could come up with.
I guess that makes sense.

I've seen all the videos about them back in the day on how the wreck shop on smaller bee's but never saw them referred to as Murder Hornets.
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Old 05-04-2020, 05:33 PM   #38
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Well, maybe some good will come of this if the Murdering Hornets agree to kill off just the Killer Bees?
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Old 05-04-2020, 05:47 PM   #39
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Old 05-04-2020, 06:01 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 150class View Post
Im also curious why the are called "Murder Hornets"? Is that a media thing?

Aren't these the Giant Japanese Hornets?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fishndude View Post
They murder bees. Or best word the media could come up with.
I ONLY thought humans could be murdered. Not insects?
The media is personifying an insect....Like Cecil the Lion.
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Old 05-04-2020, 06:18 PM   #41
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I wonder if any beekeepers have tried putting a screen around their hives, with holes small enough for the bees to negotiate but too small for the big bad hornets from hell to get through? Kind of like houses for wrens with small openings to keep out the sparrows.
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Old 05-04-2020, 07:31 PM   #42
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Um, https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...ne-minute.html
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Old 05-04-2020, 09:00 PM   #43
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Just saw on the news . . A normal bee has a stinger 1/16" . . Murder Hornet has one 1/14" . . Dammit . .
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Old 05-04-2020, 09:46 PM   #44
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Nasty little critters.
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Old 05-04-2020, 10:19 PM   #45
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It’s bad enough finding a **** red paper wasp nest in a deer blind. Can you imagine climbing 10’ up and finding one of these??
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Old 05-05-2020, 08:13 AM   #46
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So these came here the same time as the corona virus in December? From asia?
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Old 05-05-2020, 08:16 AM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carpe_diem View Post
I wonder if any beekeepers have tried putting a screen around their hives, with holes small enough for the bees to negotiate but too small for the big bad hornets from hell to get through? Kind of like houses for wrens with small openings to keep out the sparrows.
This or just screening the hive entrance with something like a queen excluder, maybe a little larger gaps would probably Keep them out. The sky is not falling today.
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Old 05-05-2020, 08:19 AM   #48
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Oh great, Murder Hornets, how much toilet paper do we need to buy to save us from these?
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Old 05-05-2020, 08:38 AM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carpe_diem View Post
I wonder if any beekeepers have tried putting a screen around their hives, with holes small enough for the bees to negotiate but too small for the big bad hornets from hell to get through? Kind of like houses for wrens with small openings to keep out the sparrows.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rjtkdplus View Post
This or just screening the hive entrance with something like a queen excluder, maybe a little larger gaps would probably Keep them out. The sky is not falling today.
An entrance reducer reduced down to a littler over 1 bee width would keep the hornets out but as I read the article the hornets will stage up outside the hive and catch them coming in and out. Apparently these hornets chemically mark the hive so that other hornets know where the buffet is. Pretty crazy
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Old 05-05-2020, 10:31 AM   #50
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Sooooooo....

Does anyone know how much toilet paper I will need for the murder hornets ?
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