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Old 03-09-2021, 08:55 PM   #1
zach
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Default Stringwalking Advice

I've been shooting a compound for about 14 years and a recurve for 5. Mainly used the recurve for bow fishing and shot instinctive. Wanting to get efficient and consistent to kill a deer with it this year. I have a set of 40lb and a set of 50lb limbs.

Does it make sense to use two paint pens to mark the string for different distances? One color for 40lbs and one for 50lbs? Anyone do something like this? String is just a $10 string.

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Old 03-09-2021, 09:47 PM   #2
stickerpatch59
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are you using fingers or a release? i'm guessing fingers.
I would say use some of the brass crimp on nocking points, as it will hold your arrow in the correct place.
however if you are using a release, the release may be to wide to fit between the nocking points for the different yardages.
also I don't know if marking your string with an indelible marker will work with a waxed string???
good luck; let us know how it works out.
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Old 03-09-2021, 10:27 PM   #3
zach
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stickerpatch59 View Post
are you using fingers or a release? i'm guessing fingers.

I would say use some of the brass crimp on nocking points, as it will hold your arrow in the correct place.

however if you are using a release, the release may be to wide to fit between the nocking points for the different yardages.

also I don't know if marking your string with an indelible marker will work with a waxed string???

good luck; let us know how it works out.
I'm using a glove. Haven't tried the coloring yet, but I may.

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Old 03-09-2021, 10:39 PM   #4
stickerpatch59
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ok so you are shooting 'fingers', I would go with the 50# limbs for sure.
just pick one and stick with it. no need to switch back and forth between limbs imo.

I shoot my hunting weight year round (65#), no matter if i'm shooting target or shooting deer.

it's a personal preference and there is no absolute draw weights for most game animals.

accuracy is your best friend. imo
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Old 03-09-2021, 10:50 PM   #5
zach
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stickerpatch59 View Post
ok so you are shooting 'fingers', I would go with the 50# limbs for sure.

just pick one and stick with it. no need to switch back and forth between limbs imo.



I shoot my hunting weight year round (65#), no matter if i'm shooting target or shooting deer.



it's a personal preference and there is no absolute draw weights for most game animals.



accuracy is your best friend. imo
Mhmm. Got a bad shoulder, but working back up to 50lbs. Working around that and numb fingers rn lol. Just trying to get consistent.

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Old 03-09-2021, 11:01 PM   #6
stickerpatch59
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for sure, you have to use what works best for you.
I killed my first deer with a 35# recurve.

accuracy!
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Old 03-10-2021, 08:01 AM   #7
Trumpkin
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So, to clarify, you want to mark your crawl with sharpie?

I think I'd lean towards just buying a dedicated string for each set of limbs, personally. Heck, I've thought about a different string for wood arrows vs carbon on the same limbs!
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Old 03-10-2021, 08:06 AM   #8
Briar Friar
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Dont fool with it. Stay with the 40 lb limbs and get ninja.

If you suck at 40lbs youll suck at 50lbs. Dont stress your shoulder any more than necessary trying to unsuck.

That being said...you could tie nock points vesus a marker. Or just use different colored sharpies. I use masking tape to mark my riser and string often...but the tape slips afterwhile.
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Old 03-10-2021, 10:28 AM   #9
Cenizo
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Are wanting to string walk or set up a fixed crawl? They seem like the same thing but are different.

99.9% of string walkers use a tab with markings or visible stitching, not a set marking on the string. They will map out the crawl for different distances similar to how a gap shooter maps their gaps. For me, my point on is 30 yards, 1 large stitch down for 25, and 3 stitches down for 20 yards. You will want two tie on knocking points (check out Jake Kaminski for instructions on moveable knocking points) to hold the arrow in place while crawling. You need movable knocking points so that you can easily adjust for tuning since crawling will make the arrow move differently than standard 3-under or split finger.

Fixed crawl can use a tab or glove. Same process as above, but you only map out one distance (I set mine to 20 yards). When found, either tie on another nocking point so that you can quickly set your hook in the correct spot, or extend your bottom nocking point down to your crawl location (this is what I do, my top nocking point is about 1/4" wide and my bottom nocking point is ~3/4" wide).

If you are wanting to use one string for two sets of limbs, then fixed crawl will be tough unless the limb models are the same, arrow length is the same, and grains per pound are the same. If those variables are all the same, then your fixed crawl should be close to identical (I'm probably not good enough to shoot the difference). You will have to keep crawl distances in your head either way if you are wanting to map out crawls for multiple distances.

One additional note is that if you use your nose to touch the fletching as another anchor point, then it will affect your crawl. As you deepen the crawl, your nose will be raised, which will raise your eyes and nullify some of the arrow-eye alignment that you gained by crawling. I use nose to feather for anchoring and will adjust my feather placement by turning the nock to fine tune my crawl after getting close during my first few rounds of shooting with the crawl.
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Old 03-10-2021, 12:51 PM   #10
zach
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cenizo View Post
Are wanting to string walk or set up a fixed crawl? They seem like the same thing but are different.

99.9% of string walkers use a tab with markings or visible stitching, not a set marking on the string. They will map out the crawl for different distances similar to how a gap shooter maps their gaps. For me, my point on is 30 yards, 1 large stitch down for 25, and 3 stitches down for 20 yards. You will want two tie on knocking points (check out Jake Kaminski for instructions on moveable knocking points) to hold the arrow in place while crawling. You need movable knocking points so that you can easily adjust for tuning since crawling will make the arrow move differently than standard 3-under or split finger.

Fixed crawl can use a tab or glove. Same process as above, but you only map out one distance (I set mine to 20 yards). When found, either tie on another nocking point so that you can quickly set your hook in the correct spot, or extend your bottom nocking point down to your crawl location (this is what I do, my top nocking point is about 1/4" wide and my bottom nocking point is ~3/4" wide).

If you are wanting to use one string for two sets of limbs, then fixed crawl will be tough unless the limb models are the same, arrow length is the same, and grains per pound are the same. If those variables are all the same, then your fixed crawl should be close to identical (I'm probably not good enough to shoot the difference). You will have to keep crawl distances in your head either way if you are wanting to map out crawls for multiple distances.

One additional note is that if you use your nose to touch the fletching as another anchor point, then it will affect your crawl. As you deepen the crawl, your nose will be raised, which will raise your eyes and nullify some of the arrow-eye alignment that you gained by crawling. I use nose to feather for anchoring and will adjust my feather placement by turning the nock to fine tune my crawl after getting close during my first few rounds of shooting with the crawl.
That's great info. I try to not let my nose or face push into the string. And it sounds like maybe another string for the other limbs would be best. Do you happen to have a picture of your nocking points as an example? Been shooting compound forever, but trad techniques are a world of their own.

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Old 03-10-2021, 01:28 PM   #11
RickBarbee
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Use a different string for each set of limbs.

If I understand you correctly, you are mainly doing this for hunting purposes, so the fixed crawl is the best way to go for that.

Tie a single crawl point onto your strings using the method shown at the following video link:

https://player.vimeo.com/video/518808011

You can (in my opinion should) use this same method with double points for your nocking points as well.

Anyway, back to the fixed crawl.
Decide what distance you want to be your primary hunting shot distance, and after you tie the knot on adjust it until it gives you that distance point on.

You may have to do a little tuning, and readjusting to get the point on distance you want, and give you good arrow flight at the same time.

Using that type knot for your crawl point makes it easy to find/get to in low light conditions such as hunting from a ground blind. You just hook the string where you know you are below the knot, then slide your fingers up until you feel the knot, and you are ready to draw & shoot.

Hope that helps.

Rick

Last edited by RickBarbee; 03-10-2021 at 01:33 PM.
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Old 03-10-2021, 04:39 PM   #12
zach
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RickBarbee View Post
Use a different string for each set of limbs.

If I understand you correctly, you are mainly doing this for hunting purposes, so the fixed crawl is the best way to go for that.

Tie a single crawl point onto your strings using the method shown at the following video link:

https://player.vimeo.com/video/518808011

You can (in my opinion should) use this same method with double points for your nocking points as well.

Anyway, back to the fixed crawl.
Decide what distance you want to be your primary hunting shot distance, and after you tie the knot on adjust it until it gives you that distance point on.

You may have to do a little tuning, and readjusting to get the point on distance you want, and give you good arrow flight at the same time.

Using that type knot for your crawl point makes it easy to find/get to in low light conditions such as hunting from a ground blind. You just hook the string where you know you are below the knot, then slide your fingers up until you feel the knot, and you are ready to draw & shoot.

Hope that helps.

Rick
That's awesome stuff. Thanks for the great info! I'm gonna have to try that out. That definitely sounds like what I'm trying to accomplish.

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Old 03-11-2021, 09:08 AM   #13
Cenizo
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Here is what my nocking point looks like. I used orange BCY Halo Crossbow Center Serving (.030"). All nock points are movable so that I can fine tune as needed. Here is how I actually set this up:
- Tie on two nocking points about five wraps wide
- Tune the bow and figure out crawl distance
- Tie on an additional five wrap nock on top to hold the top nocking point in place
- Tie on an additional bottom nocking point that goes all the way down to the crawl distance (lots of trial and error to find the correct amount of wraps)

Probably not the prettiest method, but it's what works for me and I'm not going to redo it (hopefully) for a long time.
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Last edited by Cenizo; 03-11-2021 at 09:11 AM. Reason: Correction on serving type
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Old 03-11-2021, 09:57 AM   #14
zach
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cenizo View Post
Here is what my nocking point looks like. I used orange BCY Halo Crossbow Center Serving (.030"). All nock points are movable so that I can fine tune as needed. Here is how I actually set this up:
- Tie on two nocking points about five wraps wide
- Tune the bow and figure out crawl distance
- Tie on an additional five wrap nock on top to hold the top nocking point in place
- Tie on an additional bottom nocking point that goes all the way down to the crawl distance (lots of trial and error to find the correct amount of wraps)

Probably not the prettiest method, but it's what works for me and I'm not going to redo it (hopefully) for a long time.
Thank you for sharing, that's awesome stuff. So basically by doing this you know where to hold for 20, 30, or 40yds consistently?

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Old 03-16-2021, 05:46 PM   #15
Cenizo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zach View Post
Thank you for sharing, that's awesome stuff. So basically by doing this you know where to hold for 20, 30, or 40yds consistently?

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No problem. It took me a while to figure it out. One other note is that I do not use my arrow tip to aim, but the top of my insert or outsert (currently shoot micros with silver outserts). You can add white electric tape for low light situations.

10 yards: fixed crawl and hold 4" low
15 yards: fixed crawl and hold 2" low
20 yards: fixed crawl and hold on target
25 yards: fixed crawl and hold 6" high or no crawl and hold 6" low
30 yards: no crawl and hold on target

My shooting area is maxed out at 30 yards, so I have no idea what the hold overs would be at 35 or 40. Plus all of my hunting for whitetail and hogs is from 15-20 yards, so all of my 25-30 yards shooting is for fun (although that may change here pretty quick with a Nilgai hunt in April).
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Old 03-16-2021, 07:26 PM   #16
zach
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cenizo View Post
No problem. It took me a while to figure it out. One other note is that I do not use my arrow tip to aim, but the top of my insert or outsert (currently shoot micros with silver outserts). You can add white electric tape for low light situations.



10 yards: fixed crawl and hold 4" low

15 yards: fixed crawl and hold 2" low

20 yards: fixed crawl and hold on target

25 yards: fixed crawl and hold 6" high or no crawl and hold 6" low

30 yards: no crawl and hold on target



My shooting area is maxed out at 30 yards, so I have no idea what the hold overs would be at 35 or 40. Plus all of my hunting for whitetail and hogs is from 15-20 yards, so all of my 25-30 yards shooting is for fun (although that may change here pretty quick with a Nilgai hunt in April).
That is great info, I'm going to try that out. Just having to give my numb fingers time lol.

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