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Old 01-20-2022, 11:31 PM   #1
rolylane6
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Default What's up with this deer?

Do deer get mange?

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Old 01-21-2022, 05:28 AM   #2
AntlerCollector
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Do deer get mange?


YES
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Old 01-21-2022, 06:55 AM   #3
Saltyag15
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Dang sure looks like it. Poor guy
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Old 01-21-2022, 07:18 AM   #4
bowhuntntxn
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Looks like he is losing his winter coat, and deer generally do NOT get mange. Every year there are threads with pics just like this, and none of them are mange.
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Old 01-21-2022, 07:59 AM   #5
AntlerCollector
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bowhuntntxn View Post
Looks like he is losing his winter coat, and deer generally do NOT get mange. Every year there are threads with pics just like this, and none of them are mange.

You’re right, it’s rare, but it does happen. It’s also rare for a deer to shed its winter coat in January.

Google excerpts regarding deer with mange.

“Deer infested with mange will exhibit hair loss and itching similar to deer infested with lice. The skin may be roughened and scabbed due to excessive grooming and rubbing of the skin ,and may make a deer more susceptible to secondary bacterial skin infections.”

“The photo above, taken on July 1 in Alabama, shows a classic case of deer mange, which is caused by a species of mite that lives only on whitetails, Demodex odocoilei. These mites are somewhat common on deer, but only on rare occasions does an infestation become “clinical,” meaning you can see outward signs like this doe has. These include hair loss and a thickening or wrinkling of the skin, especially on the neck and head. If you could examine this deer up close, you would see lots of small pustules or pus-filled lesions, and each of these lesions is actually a hair follicle or skin gland infested with countless, microscopic Demodex mites.”




“Yes. Mange in white-tailed deer is caused by a mite known as Demodex odocoilei that is only found on whitetails. Demodetic mange causes hair loss that is often accompanied by the thickening of the skin in the affected areas. Mange is usually rare in whitetails. The lesions are confined to the skin of the animal and do not affect the muscles. Once the animal has been skinned, the meat is edible.”
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Old 01-21-2022, 08:51 AM   #6
rolylane6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bowhuntntxn View Post
Looks like he is losing his winter coat, and deer generally do NOT get mange. Every year there are threads with pics just like this, and none of them are mange.
I've seen deer shed a winter coat but never down to bare skin like this one's hind quarter shows.

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Old 01-21-2022, 11:43 AM   #7
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Do deer generally survive this?
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Old 01-21-2022, 11:45 AM   #8
Rubberdown
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Maybe he had a surgery and they had to shave around the incision site?
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Old 01-21-2022, 12:47 PM   #9
GarGuy
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He might have run Tru a brush fire.
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Old 01-21-2022, 12:49 PM   #10
kruppa24
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Lost his pants
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Old 01-21-2022, 12:56 PM   #11
Burnadell
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Acne
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Old 01-21-2022, 01:06 PM   #12
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Parasites
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Old 01-21-2022, 01:18 PM   #13
lordvader
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Not sure but I wouldn't eat that deer.
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Old 01-21-2022, 01:25 PM   #14
sp-bow
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AntlerCollector View Post
You’re right, it’s rare, but it does happen. It’s also rare for a deer to shed its winter coat in January.

Google excerpts regarding deer with mange.

“Deer infested with mange will exhibit hair loss and itching similar to deer infested with lice. The skin may be roughened and scabbed due to excessive grooming and rubbing of the skin ,and may make a deer more susceptible to secondary bacterial skin infections.”

“The photo above, taken on July 1 in Alabama, shows a classic case of deer mange, which is caused by a species of mite that lives only on whitetails, Demodex odocoilei. These mites are somewhat common on deer, but only on rare occasions does an infestation become “clinical,” meaning you can see outward signs like this doe has. These include hair loss and a thickening or wrinkling of the skin, especially on the neck and head. If you could examine this deer up close, you would see lots of small pustules or pus-filled lesions, and each of these lesions is actually a hair follicle or skin gland infested with countless, microscopic Demodex mites.”




“Yes. Mange in white-tailed deer is caused by a mite known as Demodex odocoilei that is only found on whitetails. Demodetic mange causes hair loss that is often accompanied by the thickening of the skin in the affected areas. Mange is usually rare in whitetails. The lesions are confined to the skin of the animal and do not affect the muscles. Once the animal has been skinned, the meat is edible.”
Learned something new today.
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