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Old 09-14-2018, 02:05 PM   #1
mossyoak20
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Default Investing is stock

Going to take a stab at stock investing and wanting to know what others are doing and how itís working for you. Iíve never invested other than 401k and just recently purchased into my employer stocks with fidelity. Now Iím interested in broadening the horizon a little.


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Old 09-14-2018, 02:09 PM   #2
txhunter90
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I have been going back and forth with going to a financial advisor to help me with this as well.
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Old 09-14-2018, 02:18 PM   #3
dustoffer
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My advice is find a financial advisor----sure, they get paid, but it is worth it. Worth it at least until you have some experience. I won't take the time away from my hunting and fishing pasttimes to study up and get smart on markets, so I rely on mine. Has not let me down in 36 years.
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Old 09-14-2018, 02:19 PM   #4
batmaninja
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If you have an employer account with Fidelity it is pretty easy to set up a personal account. That is what I did, and they have great customer service. No means an expert, but I am looking at a top down approach looking at industries, and dividends. Been pretty happy so far.
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Old 09-14-2018, 02:27 PM   #5
mossyoak20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by batmaninja View Post
If you have an employer account with Fidelity it is pretty easy to set up a personal account. That is what I did, and they have great customer service. No means an expert, but I am looking at a top down approach looking at industries, and dividends. Been pretty happy so far.


I do have a account. Just not sure where to put some money. Found some penny stocks I might throw $20 at and see what happens


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Old 09-14-2018, 02:35 PM   #6
batmaninja
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They helped me set it up the first time, now I can send money from my bank to fidelity and back with a few clicks.

I hit "accounts and trade" on the top left, then "transfer", then you get....

Click on "deposit money" and then select accounts
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Old 09-14-2018, 02:41 PM   #7
Kdog
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I have a TD Ameritrade account. When I first got it I put some money in and started buying and selling. Mostly I just invested in blue chip type stocks. Right now I have 13 stocks. I cannot remember the last time I did anything with it though. It seemed like when I "sold" to "take a profit" then the stock kept going up. Plus you pay a short term capital gains tax on any money you make. So I decided to just leave it alone. I think it is up like 45%. Most all stocks are up in that same time frame, so mostly I think it is just catching a rising tide.

Good luck, it's kind of fun to mess around with. If you have some extra cash lying around then by all means go for it. I personally wouldn't play the market as my main form of investment. You would probably be better off putting it in some kind of index fund or finding a trusted financial advisor. Although, those guys are in it to make money too and will push products that you might benefit from, but they definitely will.
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Old 09-14-2018, 02:46 PM   #8
alwaysinshorts
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I worked in the investment world for 18 years before make a career change. My belief is if you do not get a financial advisor you were doing yourself and in justice. Keep in mind that you have a full-time job and only dabbled in stocks and investments on a part-time basis. This person does this for a living. Even if they can only provide you a 2% difference that 2% well exceeds what 98% of most people will do.
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Old 09-14-2018, 03:04 PM   #9
Brian77429
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be fore I give an answer give me some more information.

1. How much time do you see your self spending on this ever week or month?
2. Do you know what you would like to invest in? How will you find new things to invest in?
3. What goal do you have for this?
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Old 09-14-2018, 03:06 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alwaysinshorts View Post
I worked in the investment world for 18 years before make a career change. My belief is if you do not get a financial advisor you were doing yourself and in justice. Keep in mind that you have a full-time job and only dabbled in stocks and investments on a part-time basis. This person does this for a living. Even if they can only provide you a 2% difference that 2% well exceeds what 98% of most people will do.

great advice. financial advisor will probably tell you to max out your employers 401k if they match, then traditional ira,then roth ira. the more i look into investing, the more i realize i dont know squat. especially tax advantages.

fidelity has some good mutual funds.
you can also get a fidelity visa that has rewards. or charles schwab amex. return 1-1.5% into a trading account.
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Old 09-14-2018, 03:11 PM   #11
tdwinklr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by batmaninja View Post
If you have an employer account with Fidelity it is pretty easy to set up a personal account. That is what I did, and they have great customer service. No means an expert, but I am looking at a top down approach looking at industries, and dividends. Been pretty happy so far.
Agree 2X here with Fidelity. And used the Financial Engines app through their site and it really helped me understand what to adjust and how my assets were doing to meet my goals.
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Old 09-14-2018, 03:41 PM   #12
cj_sandman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian77429 View Post
be fore I give an answer give me some more information.

1. How much time do you see your self spending on this ever week or month?
2. Do you know what you would like to invest in? How will you find new things to invest in?
3. What goal do you have for this?
I'm with Brian on this..

Take some time to thoroughly define your goals. What are your specific goals that you want to achieve? Set some rules around how you will know when to enter/exit a position. For instance, what kind of return are you looking for? Within what kind of time frame? Are you looking for fixed income like dividends? Capital appreciation? .. What is your tolerance for risk? Put some thought around these things and it will make it possible for you to measure whether you are achieving against your goals or not.
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Old 09-14-2018, 04:53 PM   #13
rockyraider
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1. If you aren't maxing out your 401k do it before you worry about supplemental investing.

2. If you are doing #1, open a ROTH IRA with vanguard and buy their S&P 500 index.

3. Most pros CAN'T beat the market so why waste time trying. Spend your time making money, invest as much as possible for as long as possible and spend your time enjoying life.

Last edited by rockyraider; 09-14-2018 at 05:04 PM.
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Old 09-14-2018, 05:01 PM   #14
Maddox
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Read the book Bogleheads Guide to Investing

Purchase a Total Market Index Fund and be done with it.

Fidelity just started one with ZERO fees.
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Old 09-14-2018, 05:17 PM   #15
Ryanm
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Fidelity has a bunch of options for ETFs with no transaction fees. Unless you have a solid knowledge of the market, this is the best bet. It allows you to pick sectors if you wish.

Unless you're buying/selling $2-3k+ at a time, the transaction fees can hurt your return and make it a waste of time.
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Old 09-14-2018, 05:20 PM   #16
alwaysinshorts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matagordian View Post
great advice. financial advisor will probably tell you to max out your employers 401k if they match, then traditional ira,then roth ira. the more i look into investing, the more i realize i dont know squat. especially tax advantages.

fidelity has some good mutual funds.
you can also get a fidelity visa that has rewards. or charles schwab amex. return 1-1.5% into a trading account.


In general i would agree with you. But i would suggest something to think about first. Before you max out your 401k (most people donít), see if you qualify for a Roth IRA. If the answer is that you do qualify then I would place as much into your 401k as to get the match from your employer and then from there put whatever else into the Roth. EX.

1. You qualify for a Roth IRA
2. If you contribute 8k per year into your retirement and your employer matches 4K of that.
3. Put the 4K of your own money plus the employer matches 4K, so you have 8k in 401k assets.
4. You already decided to contribute 8k of your own money which means you still have 4K to contribute. This 4K should go into a Roth if you qualify. The reason is that this money is after tax contributions and will grow for you TAX FREE.
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Old 09-14-2018, 08:59 PM   #17
12RingKing
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rockyraider View Post
1. If you aren't maxing out your 401k do it before you worry about supplemental investing.

2. If you are doing #1, open a ROTH IRA with vanguard and buy their S&P 500 index.

3. Most pros CAN'T beat the market so why waste time trying. Spend your time making money, invest as much as possible for as long as possible and spend your time enjoying life.
Roth has income limitations. Please make sure you meet those before contributing directly. If you make too much income as a household, you can backdoor Roth utilizing a traditional IRA.
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Old 09-14-2018, 09:05 PM   #18
12RingKing
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maddox View Post
Read the book Bogleheads Guide to Investing

Purchase a Total Market Index Fund and be done with it.

Fidelity just started one with ZERO fees.
Iíve got all my IRA in total stock market VTSMX. Recommended by a friend when I first began and had performed well for me thus far. I lean more cowards a set it and forget it mentality. At my age this fund is ideal.
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Old 09-14-2018, 09:10 PM   #19
12RingKing
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alwaysinshorts View Post
In general i would agree with you. But i would suggest something to think about first. Before you max out your 401k (most people don’t), see if you qualify for a Roth IRA. If the answer is that you do qualify then I would place as much into your 401k as to get the match from your employer and then from there put whatever else into the Roth. EX.

1. You qualify for a Roth IRA
2. If you contribute 8k per year into your retirement and your employer matches 4K of that.
3. Put the 4K of your own money plus the employer matches 4K, so you have 8k in 401k assets.
4. You already decided to contribute 8k of your own money which means you still have 4K to contribute. This 4K should go into a Roth if you qualify. The reason is that this money is after tax contributions and will grow for you TAX FREE.
Everyone’s savings plans are different. He needs to speak to a financial advisor or that.

Typically it’s best to max out your employer matched accounts then move on from there to your IRA. One for you and one for your spouse. If you can max those out, consider an HSA if you have a high deductible health plan. You can invest the money within your HSA.

If your enployer offers after-tax contributions, and you want to contribute more after you reach your maximum 401k, IRA and HSA (if eligible), you can contribute to after tax. Hopefully your employer allows for in service distributions, then you can roll the after tax money into your Roth IRA with no income limitations. This is the mega backdoor Roth IRA
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Old 09-15-2018, 10:22 PM   #20
cbd10pt
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80% of all inventors do worse than the s&p 500
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Old 09-17-2018, 10:58 AM   #21
ren087
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Research, research, research. I use Robinhood. All the trades you want with no commission to pay. All trades are free as well as deposits and withdrawals.
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Old 09-17-2018, 11:16 AM   #22
Brian77429
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If you want to put money in and forget about it or, just want to look at it once or twice a year, go with either a mutual fund or financial adviser. If you are risk adverse go with mutual funds or financial adviser and go with risk adverse choices.

No matter what if you are an employee and your company has a 401k matching plan always, ALWAYS at least match that. So if your employer matches up to 4% do at a minimum 4%, if it is more do more. Never tell your self...I dont know if I am going to stay here so I am not going to bother with 401k now. I can not tell you how much money I have lost saying that. Do it the first chance you get no matter if you think you are going to be there a few months or a year.

If all you have to invest is 20 bucks figure out a way to save it until you have more. Can you invest 20 bucks a month? 20 bucks ever two weeks? Can you have 20 bucks taken out of every paycheck and it goes directly to your investment account? A big part of investing is building/saving wealth. If you invest 20 bucks and double your money(which is awesome!) you will only have 40 but, if you can save 20 bucks a month you will have 240 in a year.

Personally I have never met a financial adviser that cared about my money/situation more than me. They have always just wanted me to invest in a fund they were selling or set something up they wanted. Granted at that time I did not have much money so its not like they stood to make a lot from me. If you are on the fence about getting a adviser or not invest half with them and half on your own. At the end of the year see if you beat them.

While I don't beat the s&p 500 every year I do beat it and I am very happy with my results. There are lots of ways to invest and make money stocks are just one.
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Old 09-17-2018, 11:32 AM   #23
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Here is the order I recommend allocating savings. In other words, once you get #1 done, move on to #2, and so on.

1. Emergency funds (6-12 months of expenses. Be honest with yourself here on what a monthsí worth of expenses really amounts to)
2. 401k up to the match, if your employer provides a match (this is free money from your employer. Skipping it is like saying youíll do the same amount of work for less pay. If your employer offers a match on 6% by God contribute 6%)
3. Roth IRA up to the IRS annual limit, if you are eligible based on income ($5,500/year. $6,500 if you are over 50)
4. 401k on top of the employer match, up to the IRS limit. $18,500/year, $24,500 if youíre over 50
5. Taxable investments (stocks, bonds, etc. outside of IRAs and 401k)

I noticed that you mentioned you recently invested in your employer's stock. Be careful going overboard with it. The name of the game is diversification and your employer already signs your paycheck so you're really doubling down there.

Here is a thread from a while back with some personal finance tips.

https://discussions.texasbowhunter.c...d.php?t=515163
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