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Old 05-05-2015, 05:22 PM   #1
buzzbait
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Default Any wine makers on here?

Been thinking lately of trying some homemade wine. My grandfather made lots of it, but passed to soon for him to pass down his knowledge to me. Seems pretty simple. Any tips?? With the abundance of dew berries this year, has me pretty excited to give it a try.
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Old 05-05-2015, 06:37 PM   #2
cosmiccowboy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buzzbait View Post
Been thinking lately of trying some homemade wine. My grandfather made lots of it, but passed to soon for him to pass down his knowledge to me. Seems pretty simple. Any tips?? With the abundance of dew berries this year, has me pretty excited to give it a try.
I'm doing the whole grapes to wine thing for the last 5 years. Vines yielded 54 gallons last year. My wine is OK but not great. I'm thinking of getting professional help this year. There are so many tiny tweaks to tuning the finished product that I don't know. Reasonably good table wine has gotten so cheap in the stores I'm beginning to think it's not worth the trouble.

If you want to put up small quantities of berry wine search Jack Keller for recipes.

Heres your link:

http://winemaking.jackkeller.net/wineblognew.asp
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Old 05-05-2015, 08:58 PM   #3
buzzbait
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How do you know the fruit to sugar to water ratio? Say I want to make five gallons. How many pounds of fruit would I use?
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Old 05-05-2015, 09:18 PM   #4
The Real CWB
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I've been making muscadine wine for the past 4 years. I started for the exact same reason you want to. My Papa used to make it and all I've ever wanted to do is follow in his foot steps. We have wild mustang (muscadine) grapes growing on our property that I harvest each July/August. I really have it down to a science and it is amazing! Every time I bottle a batch everyone in my family is begging for a bottle. But I make em wait another 3-6 months after it's been bottled. I'll help you out. I've got the recipe and list of all the chemicals and supplies you will need to get started typed up at my office. I will scan it and post it here for you.
Here's some pics of mine and the custom labels I made.





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Old 05-05-2015, 09:20 PM   #5
buzzbait
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Man. That looks awesome
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Old 05-05-2015, 09:27 PM   #6
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That's awesome!
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Old 05-05-2015, 09:33 PM   #7
TxBrokenTine
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Mustang grapes and muscadine grapes aren't the same.....
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Old 05-05-2015, 10:28 PM   #8
boomer453
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been making beer and wine for a while now, for your first wine google "Apfelwein" a very easy, hard to screw up, not overly complicated wine you can do and have bottled inside 6 weeks or less. Here's the entire ingredient list.

Apple juice
Corn sugar
Montrachet yeast

No need to rack to secondary, just let it ferment dry and then clear in primary for a while then it's ready to bottle if you want to leave it dry or you can kill the yeast and backsweeten. You could even sweeten and then pasteurize to kill the yeast and you'll end up with a sweet sparkling wine.
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Old 05-05-2015, 10:40 PM   #9
RodinaRanč
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Making a good batch of berry or prickly pear is little different than mess'n with grapes.

Hit up Heinsohn's in Frelsburg. They're a great source of info & supplies.
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Old 05-05-2015, 11:38 PM   #10
The Real CWB
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TxBrokenTine View Post
Mustang grapes and muscadine grapes aren't the same.....

Hybrid muscadines are descended from the wild mustang grapes that grow all over East Texas. The recipe I use works for any of these type grapes; hence the "mustang (muscadine)" reference. They have a tough, bitter skin which makes them unpleasant to eat out of hand but they are perfect for wine making.
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Old 05-05-2015, 11:56 PM   #11
TexMax
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I made some in my closet out of minute maid once. Terrible stuff
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Old 05-06-2015, 09:24 AM   #12
buzzbait
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Went to heinsohns yesterday.
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Old 05-06-2015, 09:31 AM   #13
RodinaRanč
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Atta boy...lol, now you're walk'n lil taller with a lighter wallet!! Can't ever seem to walk outta there w/ just what i "need" or walked in there for.
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Old 05-06-2015, 09:50 AM   #14
SwampRabbit
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Been making wine off an on since college. It seems every 2 years I get the itch to make another batch of dessert wine. If I had any property, I'd grow some "wild" grapes and take whatever the critters didn't and make a batch a year.

My favorite to make is still mead, a semi sweet or dry mead is hard to beat and is really easy to make.

Tips:

Start with a kit from concentrate and get a handle on the process. Then graduate to fresh fruits. Fresh fruits have thier own problems of keeping the must from getting spoiled during the initial fermentation, etc. With concentrate, you can ferment directly in the carboy.

Which brings me to carboys. You need more than one. For meads, ciders, or anything I am doing direct from juice, I am using a 6.5 gallon carboy as my primary, and a 5 gallon as my secondary (or 5 gal primary, 3 gal secondary.) It can be addicting... I had up to six 3gal carboys at one time. Now I have two 6s, four 5s and a couple 3s.

When you get to actual fresh fruit, you will want to score yourself some big food grade buckets.

Find a good brew store in your area of you can. Most are run by beerheads, but mention mead and chances are you can bond at some level.

Get a good book on wine making so you can start to understand the concepts. In those books or at least on the internet, you will find things about how much additional sugar you may need for certain alcohol content, etc.
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Old 05-06-2015, 09:57 AM   #15
SwampRabbit
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BTW, my favorite wine consists of only the following:

HEB organic apple cider (no preservatives!!!.) I buy 6 when they go on sale real cheap.
Sugar
Campden tablets (sulfur)
McCormicks Apple Pie Seasoning

I run the sugar up to about 15% alcohol by volume potential knowing the limits of my yeast will put me somewhere around 13.5% with enough residual sugar to make it sweet, but not too sweet.

Final product is a wine that reminds you of apple pie, but warms you up. 2 cases worth that probably sets me back about $25. Cheaper than 3 buck chuck.
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Old 05-06-2015, 10:13 AM   #16
The Real CWB
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Here is the list of minimum equipment needed to get started and the recipe and procedure:


Wild Grape Wine Recipe (Mustang and/or Muscadine)

MINIMUM EQUIPMENT:
Large food grade-quality plastic bucket or earthenware crock (primary fermenter)
Large plastic sheet or cover for primary fermenter
Large nylon staining bag for primary fermentation
At least 2 narrow-neck glass jug or carboys (secondary fermenters)
Fermentation locks for each secondary fermenter
Plastic syphon tubing
5 "fifth" (750 ml.) wine bottles and corks for each gallon to be made
Sodium metabisulfite to sanitiize equipment and bottles


INGREDIENTS: For each gallon of wine to be made
1 gallon of MASHED grapes
6 cups sugar (or specific gravity -1.090)
7 pints of water
1 1/2 campden tablets (or 3/16 tsp. sodium metabisulfite)
1 tsp. yeast nutrient (e.g. Super Ferment)
1/2 tsp. pectic enzyme powder or 5 drops liquid pectic enzyme
1 pkg. wine yeast (for up to five gallons)
1/2 tsp. Potassium Sorbate (after fermentation!)

PROCEDURE:
1. Pick, wash, and mash only VERY ripe grapes. Green grapes will cause the wine to be very sour but a few green grapes mixed in will not hurt the batch. Remove the large stems from the mashed grapes. ALWAYS WEAR RUBBER GLOVES WHEN HANDLING THE GRAPES to protect your hands from the acid found in the skins of the grapes. If you are using a nylon straining bag, you may want to put the mashed pulp into the bag immediately and tie it up.
2. Add the water (cold), yeast nutrient, pectic enzyme, sugar, and the campden tablets (crushed and dissolved in warm water). DO NOT ADD THE YEAST (or potassium sorbate) YET!! Stir until all ingredients are dissolved.
3. Cover the primary fermenter with plastic sheet or lid. Stir the mash every 4 hours for one day. At the end of this first day, sprinkle the wine yeast packet on to the must. Cover the fermenter.
4. For the next 5 days, stir the must 2 or 3 times a day. Make sure the floating pulp (the "cap") is submerged. Fermentation temperature should be between 60° - 80°..
5. At the end of this 5 day period, remove the pulp from the primary fermenter. Strain and discard the pulp. Syphon the juice remaining into the sterilized glass jug(s). Attach the fermentation lock and place in a cool dark area. Action should stop in a few weeks.
6. When fermentation is complete (S.G. 1.000 or less), "rack" (syphon) the wine into sterilized jugs, being sure to fill them into the neck with liquid. Attach fementation lock. Allow to stand in a cool dark place until clear and stable. Repeat this "racking" procedure once a month for several months. You may want to use a wine clearing agent at this point before moving on to step 7.
7. Stabilize the wine with potassium sorbate (1/2 tsp. per gallon). After 48 hours you may sweeten the wine with a simple syrup (2 parts sugar to 1 part boiling water). For a "fruitier" finish, substitute fructose for household sugar. Sweeten to taste. Bottle the wine, cork, and allow to stand upright for 4 days. Lay wine on its side and allow to age for at least 3 - 6 months. The wine will improve with age.
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Old 05-06-2015, 10:35 AM   #17
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Old 05-06-2015, 10:48 AM   #18
Danimal14
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I was wanting to do this myself for the first time with a blanc du bois grape vine I have that the grapes are just to bitter to use as table grapes
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Old 05-06-2015, 11:22 AM   #19
ridge reaper
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I started making wine 4 or 5 years ago. My wife's grandfather made good wine and after he passed her grandmother gave me most of his old books and equipment. I find fruit wines to be the most difficult to make and have had my best success with muscadine and mustang grape wine. I agree with the post above on jack Keller website is very helpful. Good luck.
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Old 05-06-2015, 11:52 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TxBrokenTine View Post
Mustang grapes and muscadine grapes aren't the same.....
X2
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Old 05-06-2015, 11:53 AM   #21
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Either way it will make some great wine! I have alot of spots around the Houston area that im going to be picking come early july. I will be making wine for the first time this year so ill be following this post.
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Old 05-06-2015, 11:59 AM   #22
Bigdaddy
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no I don't make wine but I sure do enjoy a good glass of wine donations can be sent to .............
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Old 09-12-2018, 09:13 PM   #23
bughunter
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Is the pectin necessary .
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Old 09-12-2018, 09:34 PM   #24
Briar Friar
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Methusa thread of wine making lives!!!!

First and only time...in 2010...before kids...flood wiped me out during secondary fermentation. Thought about sampling some but it had been flooded and didnt feel like gettin the squirts.

Ive got 90 american hybrid vines in the ground and 2 years left of establishment left. Better get better at vinology real dang soon.
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Old 09-12-2018, 09:36 PM   #25
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I make beer these days but I’ve been thinking about making blackberry wine from my backyard crop.

Back in college a fraternity brother set me up with my first wine batch ever. Fermenter was a 5 gallon ozarka jug. It was filled with Welch’s, sugar and dry yeast. Terrible stuff obviously but perfect for college.
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Old 09-12-2018, 09:51 PM   #26
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My FIL has muscadines every year. My wife made something like 15-20 bottles of wine and it only came out mediocre. Taste better as a mixer. Lol. Gonna show her the recipes on here.
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Old 09-12-2018, 10:15 PM   #27
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I wonder if this recipe will work with dewberries
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Old 09-12-2018, 10:16 PM   #28
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Subscribed!

At this very moment I am aging a gallon of blackberry wine that I made a few months ago. Took the recipe out of a book that I will post later. When I racked it for the first time, I took a small sample, and it tasted **** good. I honestly surprised myself. In for more ideas/info/recipes. It’s kinda addicting once you start.
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Old 09-12-2018, 11:34 PM   #29
fulldraw_529
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Jack keller has a lot of good info on his website for you to look into. I've made several wines with his recipes. I just bottled a prickly pear wine this past weekend that is pretty awesome. I just started an apple pie wine I hope will be ready by the holidays.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk
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Old 09-14-2018, 02:15 PM   #30
cactusassjohn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bughunter View Post
Is the pectin necessary .
yes/ been making wine for @ 25 years now. check out FERMENTER'S SUPPLY AND EQUIPMENT. yes its in omaha,ne but he has a web sight and get the purple book he sells has everthing u need to know about it. good luck
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