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Old 05-09-2019, 11:31 PM   #1
BertramBass
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Default Conventional Septic Systems

Anyone having issues with their septic system due to all the rain soaked soil?
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Old 05-10-2019, 04:02 AM   #2
Kmiles84
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You may have poor soil conditions like many depending on location. That’s why more and more aerobic systems are being installed once a conventional fails.
TCEQ under failing systems -“Misidentification of soil or site conditions
Before February 4, 1997, the most common way an OSSF was designed was based on percolation tests. Unfortunately, the percolation test did not address any limiting factors to a depth of two feet below the bottom of the drainfield or address the soil texture in the disposal area.
Subsurface water flow within the disposal field, subsurface restrictive horizons below the disposal field, or seasonally saturated soils will cause OSSF failure and requires corrective action by the property owner.
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Old 05-10-2019, 07:19 AM   #3
HoustonR6ryda
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kmiles84 View Post
You may have poor soil conditions like many depending on location. That’s why more and more aerobic systems are being installed once a conventional fails.
TCEQ under failing systems -“Misidentification of soil or site conditions
Before February 4, 1997, the most common way an OSSF was designed was based on percolation tests. Unfortunately, the percolation test did not address any limiting factors to a depth of two feet below the bottom of the drainfield or address the soil texture in the disposal area.
Subsurface water flow within the disposal field, subsurface restrictive horizons below the disposal field, or seasonally saturated soils will cause OSSF failure and requires corrective action by the property owner.
do you sell these systems?
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Old 05-10-2019, 08:02 AM   #4
Kmiles84
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Originally Posted by HoustonR6ryda View Post
do you sell these systems?
No
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Old 05-10-2019, 08:40 AM   #5
BertramBass
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kmiles84 View Post
You may have poor soil conditions like many depending on location. That’s why more and more aerobic systems are being installed once a conventional fails.
TCEQ under failing systems -“Misidentification of soil or site conditions
Before February 4, 1997, the most common way an OSSF was designed was based on percolation tests. Unfortunately, the percolation test did not address any limiting factors to a depth of two feet below the bottom of the drainfield or address the soil texture in the disposal area.
Subsurface water flow within the disposal field, subsurface restrictive horizons below the disposal field, or seasonally saturated soils will cause OSSF failure and requires corrective action by the property owner.
The system is 3.5 years old. Had 4 profile holes dug to 4 foot. "Supposedly" perfect soil for a conventional. House, tank and all lines were shot with a transit by both the installer and the county inspector. The problem appears to be due to drainage/ponding over the tank and field.
I was thinking with all the rain recently, in such short times, that some other folks could be experiencing slow/non flushing toilets,etc. Kinda chitty deal.
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Old 05-10-2019, 08:45 AM   #6
Chitchyaoutdoor
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i have that issue with mine when we get alot of rain
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Old 05-10-2019, 08:53 AM   #7
BertramBass
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Originally Posted by Chitchyaoutdoor View Post
i have that issue with mine when we get alot of rain
Have you tried anything to divert the surface water? Does it pond?

The home owners wife went in the house when we were discussing doing their "business" in a 5 gallon bucket and when showering outside with the garden hose, not to stand over the tank or field... LOL
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Old 05-10-2019, 09:21 AM   #8
Chitchyaoutdoor
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mine is 22 years old, just started having the first tank pumped every year for $200 and it solved the problem. the way i look at it is pay 8k for a new system and still have to pay around $300 in service a year or just get it pumped every year and baby it along until i sell the house.
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Old 05-10-2019, 09:30 AM   #9
Bucksaw
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Our system is the original system from the mid 70s. never had a problem until about 2015, but been having trouble with mine over the last couple of years. Usually starts about the first of the year and goes through March. Usually once the plants start greening up it would be OK. This year it started in November and gave us trouble through about April, every time it rained. Now its flooded again, and not working, but we are at over 100% soil saturation. You cant even step in my yard anywhere without sinking ankle deep.

The wife has about $8K saved up that we are going to put toward a new aerobic system when it dries up. I hate to go aerobic because some peopl tell horror stories, but I am willing to put in the work to have my drains flow and my toilets flush.
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Old 05-10-2019, 09:30 AM   #10
Quackerbox
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chitchyaoutdoor View Post
i have that issue with mine when we get alot of rain
We have a few with ours as well. I have mine pumped every year or so

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Old 05-10-2019, 11:04 AM   #11
hound dog
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Have your washing machine water piped out away from the house such as your side yard away from your general leach lines. Won't help you with the rains, but will help keep your drain field less congested.
If you have vacant acreage around you, pull lid off grey water tank and drop a small electrical pump in tank to pump water away from house and normal drain field. This is by no means a permanent fix. But it allows you to shower and flush toilets.
Don't pump it in neighbors yard :-)
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Old 05-10-2019, 11:19 AM   #12
kingranch
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I've seen alot of ppl regret the traditional septic after it rains alot and ur toilets back up...
That was enough for me to spend the extra cash and go w aerobic....
Try to minimize long showers etc ..until it dries out some and this might buy u some space for the toilet flush
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Old 05-10-2019, 11:55 AM   #13
Traildust
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kingranch View Post
I've seen alot of ppl regret the traditional septic after it rains alot and ur toilets back up...
That was enough for me to spend the extra cash and go w aerobic....
Try to minimize long showers etc ..until it dries out some and this might buy u some space for the toilet flush
Ya....I just ordered another $600 aerobic aerator motor this morning. They are great!
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Old 05-10-2019, 11:56 AM   #14
timberking
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No problem as long as sh#$% still runs downhill
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Old 05-10-2019, 11:23 PM   #15
Draco
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Many conventional systems now require two drain fields with a valve that turns from one to the other. When one gets saturated, you turn it to the other for a while. No one I know that has one has any problems.
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Old 05-11-2019, 07:59 AM   #16
tps7742
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Originally Posted by Draco View Post
Many conventional systems now require two drain fields with a valve that turns from one to the other. When one gets saturated, you turn it to the other for a while. No one I know that has one has any problems.
This makes good sense if a conventional system is being installed.
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Old 05-11-2019, 08:22 AM   #17
BertramBass
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No problem as long as sh#$% still runs downhill
It runs down hill until the tank and field are saturated with water. Then it floats in the toilet...

This particular homeowner has added a 20' slab and pergola as well as flatwork with a fire pit, changing all the grading. Water now sheds off the pergola on one side and ponds on the tank and also obstructs drainage so water ponds on the field, on the opposite side. He thinks it is the builder's issue.
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Old 05-11-2019, 01:00 PM   #18
friscopaint
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we had a problem this year for the first time. Tons of rain and need to put dirt over leach lines due to ponding, ground is absolutely saturated. Have to have it pumped since no place for the water to go.
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Old 05-12-2019, 07:24 AM   #19
lunatic'hunter
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Put our aerobic system in "92. Fella at the county office told me i would need 300' of field line and the soil makeup would make it difficult for conventional. At the time we had brush behind us and we had started construction so i didn't have time to dig out field lines. So the decision was easy. We are kinda low but not in floodplain. We have had our share of floods including Harvey, and hear horror stories of people with conventional tanks. I do have my washing machine watering the back yard. No regrets here.
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