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Old 05-18-2019, 07:44 AM   #1
Kbar
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Default Tree ID on old homestead

Its every bit of 30 feet tall and 40 feet wide.
Surrounded by cornfields. I drive by it daily and noticed this year it was loaded with white flowers.
I stopped and took these pictures yesterday.
I think its a pear but not sure.
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Old 05-18-2019, 07:54 AM   #2
Low Fence
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Bradford pear
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Old 05-18-2019, 08:01 AM   #3
Kbar
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Does anyone know if it can be "ground layered" sucessfully?
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Old 05-18-2019, 08:06 AM   #4
Low Fence
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Not sure what that is?

It will grow super thick and due to that they are extremely prone to breaking off and splitting with high winds and ice. I’ve got about 7-8 and none are complete trees anymore

They are an ornamental tree that bloom snowy white in early spring
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Old 05-18-2019, 08:09 AM   #5
muzzlebrake
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Wild Crabapple tree
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Old 05-18-2019, 08:14 AM   #6
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They split out horrible. But grow so fast they fill back in fairly quick
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Old 05-18-2019, 08:16 AM   #7
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Pear
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Old 05-18-2019, 08:45 AM   #8
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Simple picture of ground layering.

Its definitely spilit into several large limbs. If they can be ground layered to produce roots I would rather do some of the larger ones in plastic tubs.
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Old 05-18-2019, 08:55 AM   #9
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So the limb that is pegged is still attached to tree? Or has been removed from tree?

The limbs are so brittle that I don’t know if you could bend one that much anyway.

I know where the roots run out of the ground if you nic it it will sprout saplings (and they will have an almost thorn on them)
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Old 05-18-2019, 09:24 AM   #10
jeremy360
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Bark graft a few regular limbs to it. With a tree that mature you will have a nice pear tree in no time
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Old 05-18-2019, 09:32 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeremy360 View Post
Bark graft a few regular limbs to it. With a tree that mature you will have a nice pear tree in no time
Itís a Bradford. They donít produce fruit, just those little ďballsĒ you see in pic. Itís an ornamental tree
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Old 05-18-2019, 02:46 PM   #12
joe_doss
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Bradford pear and like stated above it’s fruitless. They usually don’t live too long, around 20-30 years and they’ll start to decline fairly quick. That one looks like it’s been there awhile. They were real popular in the 90’s and early 2000’s.
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Old 05-18-2019, 04:11 PM   #13
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You can air layer too. I did this one with a regular pear tree.
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Old 05-18-2019, 05:41 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Low Fence View Post
Itís a Bradford. They donít produce fruit, just those little ďballsĒ you see in pic. Itís an ornamental tree
Right.....chop off Bradford limbs. Then take your favorite pear tree. In March, take a couple limbs about the size of a pencil with one or two buds. Slide them under the bark. Let them grow.

I've done it tons. Heres an example where I grafted hachiya persimmon onto wild persimmon.

This one was done this march.
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Old 05-18-2019, 05:53 PM   #15
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All my fruit trees are grafted to some sort of native root stock. I have a grated fruit cocktail tree on wild plum stock that has peaches, nectarines, red plums and blue damson plums all on the same tree.
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Old 05-18-2019, 07:52 PM   #16
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Yep I have methley, wild, and Santa rosa plums all on one tree. Helps with pollination.

Easy and cheap way to do citrus. Plant the seeds from an orange from the store. Then graft on from a tree you already have.
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Old 05-18-2019, 11:15 PM   #17
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I think that one is a native pear. They get normal size but remain hard. Not good for fresh eating but can be canned. I had one at our first house.
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Old 05-19-2019, 06:27 AM   #18
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Desirable fruit is where I want to be at the end of the game.
Right now its remove as much huisache and rosehedge and replace with something better.
So- yes J -360 I could do the airlayering but would only gain a small diameter.
If I can ground layer it, I may put some of the lower split branches in a big plastic tub (think cattle feed tub) that can be left for a year or so to take root.

Thanks for the responses
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Old 05-19-2019, 08:16 AM   #19
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One thing to help success of the ground layer....wrap a single wire around the branch you are going to ground layer. Wrap it tight. Let it go three or four weeks...it will start to cut in as it grows. Then take the wire off and scar up at that point and bury. What is does is build up auxin...the chemical responsible for root formation. Auxin flows from the leaves down the cambium (or something close to that.). The wire stops it and concentrates it at that point. Not 100 percent necessary, but I've had a higher percent of success doing that.
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