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Old 01-02-2019, 07:49 PM   #1
bowfishtank401
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I currently have a single cam , PSE firestorm that has a 29 inch draw and a max draw weight at 70 pounds what is the benefits of dual cam ,single cam or no cam and is it worth the upgrade I'm looking to upgrade to more modern style something of the 5 years any recommendations?

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Old 01-03-2019, 01:19 AM   #2
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Dual cam will give you more speed with less draw weight. It is all preference. A single cam will kill just as good as a dual cam. The biggest difference I have noticed in the parallel limb designs is the vibration. If tuned properly you will only hear the string and almost no hand shock/vibration. That was my biggest take away when I first fired a parallel limb design. I will never no back. I am sure others hear could give you other opinions also.
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Old 01-03-2019, 01:30 AM   #3
AggieArcher
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Walk into a pro shop and shoot a new bow. It’ll blow your mind compared to your current one! The speed increase and lack of vibration on any modern bow will be hands down better than something from 15-20 years ago. Pretty much every company has gone to a dual cam-like system, and I believe thats for a reason, but I’d let some of the more technical guys weigh in on why that is. Even Mathews “Solocam” doesn’t produce solo cam bows as their flagship anymore. Go hold and shoot them all and see which one speaks to you!
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Old 01-03-2019, 01:45 AM   #4
bowfishtank401
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Originally Posted by AggieArcher View Post
Walk into a pro shop and shoot a new bow. It’ll blow your mind compared to your current one! The speed increase and lack of vibration on any modern bow will be hands down better than something from 15-20 years ago. Pretty much every company has gone to a dual cam-like system, and I believe thats for a reason, but I’d let some of the more technical guys weigh in on why that is. Even Mathews “Solocam” doesn’t produce solo cam bows as their flagship anymore. Go hold and shoot them all and see which one speaks to you!
I saw a 2014 Mathews no cam design it looked weird what's the deal with that?


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Old 01-03-2019, 01:53 AM   #5
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Weird In what way?
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Old 01-03-2019, 02:00 AM   #6
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Weird In what way?
The cams where unlike any I have seen almost like experimental at a glance it looked normal it's like a 500 bow


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Old 01-03-2019, 07:25 AM   #7
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I shoot the no cam and love it. Super smooth but not a burner on speed.
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Old 01-03-2019, 10:42 AM   #8
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The answer to your question could fill a book; here's the short version.

Dual Cam Cams are mirror images of each other and not slaved together, each cam can work independently of the other cam. Timing was critical and on early bows, with less advanced string/cable material, it was easy for them to go out of time and cause shooting irregularities. Two cams are still produced mainly in "grow with you" bows like the Hoyt Klash.

Single Cam Three track single cam with an idler wheel, made it possible to eliminate timing errors of two cam bows, although they could still go out of tune due to string or cable elongation. Early models had terrible nock point travel that made them difficult to tune, but it was possible. Great marketing lead to them being very popular.

Binary Cams AKA dual track binary cams are just like dual cams but the cams are slaved together by the cables; this makes timing slightly easier than two cam models, but not by much. Probably the most popular system out right now.

Hybrid Cams Hoyt uses this exclusively on their flagship bows. The cams are not mirror images and the timing is set using a control cable and buss cable; thus allowing the tuning to be done for both timing and starting position independently and very easily.

No cam system is really "better" than the other one, all have pros and cons. However, with today's advanced string and cable materials and the advent of "balanced" cams (like Prime, Mathews, Pse, etc.) there is a real difference in overall performance to bows of just 5-7 years ago due to reduced system torque. Other companies, like Bowtech, choose to build a system that does not use a balanced cam, but is easily tuned to deliver torque free performance (less cam lean) more like the two cam bows of old.

As a rule the single cam tech is a bit slower and many times less efficient than any of the other cam systems, but can be made to be very smooth for the energy delivered.

All of them can be tuned and shot well.

IMHO, yes, it is worth the upgrade but just due to the cam design; bows as a whole have made major improvements in limbs, riser designs and overall shootability the last 5-7 years compared to your Firestorm.
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Old 01-03-2019, 12:43 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by Rat View Post
The answer to your question could fill a book; here's the short version.



Dual Cam Cams are mirror images of each other and not slaved together, each cam can work independently of the other cam. Timing was critical and on early bows, with less advanced string/cable material, it was easy for them to go out of time and cause shooting irregularities. Two cams are still produced mainly in "grow with you" bows like the Hoyt Klash.



Single Cam Three track single cam with an idler wheel, made it possible to eliminate timing errors of two cam bows, although they could still go out of tune due to string or cable elongation. Early models had terrible nock point travel that made them difficult to tune, but it was possible. Great marketing lead to them being very popular.



Binary Cams AKA dual track binary cams are just like dual cams but the cams are slaved together by the cables; this makes timing slightly easier than two cam models, but not by much. Probably the most popular system out right now.



Hybrid Cams Hoyt uses this exclusively on their flagship bows. The cams are not mirror images and the timing is set using a control cable and buss cable; thus allowing the tuning to be done for both timing and starting position independently and very easily.



No cam system is really "better" than the other one, all have pros and cons. However, with today's advanced string and cable materials and the advent of "balanced" cams (like Prime, Mathews, Pse, etc.) there is a real difference in overall performance to bows of just 5-7 years ago due to reduced system torque. Other companies, like Bowtech, choose to build a system that does not use a balanced cam, but is easily tuned to deliver torque free performance (less cam lean) more like the two cam bows of old.



As a rule the single cam tech is a bit slower and many times less efficient than any of the other cam systems, but can be made to be very smooth for the energy delivered.



All of them can be tuned and shot well.



IMHO, yes, it is worth the upgrade but just due to the cam design; bows as a whole have made major improvements in limbs, riser designs and overall shootability the last 5-7 years compared to your Firestorm.
Thank you this was very helpfull and I'm not wanting to upgrade just because of the cams I was just a but more interested in the different designs and what they do or what the upgrades could benefit in I've just noticed a huge overall speed bump and stability and wait and accuracy even in newer bows and I'd rather use that than my dinosaur

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Old 01-03-2019, 02:56 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by bowfishtank401 View Post
Thank you this was very helpfull and I'm not wanting to upgrade just because of the cams I was just a but more interested in the different designs and what they do or what the upgrades could benefit in I've just noticed a huge overall speed bump and stability and wait and accuracy even in newer bows and I'd rather use that than my dinosaur

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Every manufacturer has a design they think is the best! Fortunately, the designs usually do add something substantial to the bow.

Parallel limbs offer less recoil at the shot, which translates into reduced vibration and the "dead in the hand" feel we all like.

Caged and bridged risers help keep a bow stiff yet light.

Prime has perfected the center grip tech (others have tried) and the swerve in the lower half of the riser for better stability.

PSE has a limb adjustment system for tuning built into the limb pockets.

Long stiff risers offer more rigidity than ever for torque free shooting.

Cable guards have changed to the point where they are no longer an obstacle to tune around but can be used to tune the bow.

Bowtech overdrive binary cams have all kinds of things that can flip from smooth to fast, micro-tune and adjust draw length without a press.

Mathews has long been known for built in dampeners that help in many ways other than just vibration dampening, like adding weight in the right spot.

There are lots of good reasons to shoot a new bow right now.
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Old 01-03-2019, 03:09 PM   #11
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I would jump on that no cam for500 best shooting bow I’ve ever shot . Not a speed bow but a smooth forgiving shooter.
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Old 01-03-2019, 03:12 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Hoss163 View Post
I would jump on that no cam for500 best shooting bow I’ve ever shot . Not a speed bow but a smooth forgiving shooter.
Is sacrificing speed really worth it?


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Old 01-03-2019, 03:21 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Rat View Post

Hybrid Cams Hoyt uses this exclusively on their flagship bows. The cams are not mirror images and the timing is set using a control cable and buss cable; thus allowing the tuning to be done for both timing and starting position independently and very easily.
Bears also use Hybrid cams.
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Old 01-03-2019, 03:36 PM   #14
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What do you need speed for ? I used to think I wanted speed to I had a halon that shot 319 FPS but I shoot the no cam twice as accurate as I did the Halon . Unless you plan on shooting Animals out past 30 yards the speed isn’t going to come in that big of play . Just go to your local bow shop get them to set up what ever bow feels the best in your hands when you shoot it . A faster bow is a quicker Miss is all it is . Brace height is the key if you want speed find the bow with the longest brace height that has the ibo speed that you would be happiest with . And yes the duel cams are going to give you more speed but the brace height makes a difference as well as far a speed goes .


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Old 01-03-2019, 03:40 PM   #15
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Y’all are some smart jokers
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Old 01-03-2019, 03:44 PM   #16
bowfishtank401
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Originally Posted by Lawhunter View Post
Y’all are some smart jokers
Please collaborate I'm here to learn if you have a different opinion I'd like to know ?


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Old 01-03-2019, 05:49 PM   #17
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Is sacrificing speed really worth it?


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In almost every instance yes, but there is a lot more to consider than just speed (or lack thereof).

A smoother draw may be better for someone with a bad shoulder or back; or, as Hoss said, he was just more accurate with the slower bow.

A quiet bow may give you an advantage; slower is almost always quieter.

Heavier arrows (slower) both make the bow quieter and have better penetration potential than lighter, faster arrows.

Speed is fine if you know what you are doing, but making speed the number one priority is way out of most people wheelhouse. It is a lot of extra effort for not much return for the average bow hunter.

All things considered, speed is the first thing I will sacrifice for a well performing system.
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Old 01-03-2019, 05:54 PM   #18
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In almost every instance yes, but there is a lot more to consider than just speed (or lack thereof).



A smoother draw may be better for someone with a bad shoulder or back; or, as Hoss said, he was just more accurate with the slower bow.



A quiet bow may give you an advantage; slower is almost always quieter.



Heavier arrows (slower) both make the bow quieter and have better penetration potential than lighter, faster arrows.



Speed is fine if you know what you are doing, but making speed the number one priority is way out of most people wheelhouse. It is a lot of extra effort for not much return for the average bow hunter.



All things considered, speed is the first thing I will sacrifice for a well performing system.
I do agree with you but it seems that most of my shot are between 60 and 30 yards and wind becomes a problem in my experience faster arrow have less affect in the wind and had animals moves bc of time between the arrow leaving the bow to find its mark I understand speed is not ever thing but I'm hoping to make a even compromise between speed and smooth equipment

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Old 01-07-2019, 11:34 AM   #19
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Does anyone have any experience with this bow at all I have recently purchased one and it will be here about Friday the 11th and was wondering what is necessary to upgrade from what I read its a 2017 mission hype DTX and retailed for 825$ but I have also seen it for 599$ I found mine on ebay in great condition for 239.99$ so it was a steal it was on ebay for a total of 3 hours when I bought it what should I expect and what should be replaced?

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Old 01-07-2019, 09:23 PM   #20
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Expect a decent shooting bow, not fast but real smooth, big valley with a little mushy wall. It is a grow-with-you type bow, so adjustment is easy.

Like any used bow, check the cams for dings and the string for wear; look it over real well for signs of abuse, excessive wear or neglect.

I would replace the strings, but I would do that on any used bow. It's really up to you after checking the string out.

That aren't bad, but don't expect flagship performance. Tune it, shoot it and have fun.

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Old 01-08-2019, 03:16 PM   #21
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I like speed out of a bow but that is because i shoot a 595 grain arrow so speed helps this arrow pack a punch although it is still shootable. The heavier arrow helped my accuracy at longer distances, gave me a more forgiving set up and made the bow really quiet and almost vibration free.
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