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Old 07-29-2021, 08:49 PM   #1
jhunter77
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Default Offshore boats..... tell me the pros and the cons

I keep getting the itch to get an offshore boat. I love it out there, and this last week was great conditions. Tell me the pros and cons, and what to look for in a used boat. I see lots of boats in the 10 to 15k range that appear sea worthy/reliable. Is that realistic? I would want to be able to run out around 60miles.
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Old 07-29-2021, 09:05 PM   #2
warrington
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Cost a lot
Lot of upkeep
Need two + engines to be safe
Not good for skiiing etc


Positive
Offshore fishing is fun
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Old 07-29-2021, 09:17 PM   #3
panhandlehunter
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I’m not sure what kind of boats you’re looking at for 10-15k. You can take whatever you want offshore when it’s calm.
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Old 07-29-2021, 09:17 PM   #4
kingfisher_jr
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Realistically, you would be extremely lucky to find anything seaworthy to 60 miles for 15K. Probably looking more like at least 4X that (if lucky) for a decent offshore boat that is steadily realizably for 60 mile trips. In my opinion reliability is the number 1 concern in a offshore boat and that means twin outboards. I have made many trips in single outboard bay boats, and still do, but the conditions have to be perfect and I try not to go past ~30 miles on a perfect day. That's with a nice bay boat, VHF radios, and a EBIRB. Even on our offshore boat with twin outboards, things still happen. I have lost an outboard for various reasons about 5 times. That's in a hundred+ trips, but things do happen. It is extremely nice to have that other motor when things go south. Even with quality machinery and regular maintenance, things happen. In my opinion all that you can do is minimize the amount of times things do happen and be prepared when they do.

To simply answer the question, in all honesty and my own personal opinion.

The Pro's are: It's fun. You get to make great memories. Deep water fish fight more, get bigger, and taste better. (Plus you never know what your gonna catch out there.)

The Con's: It's expensive if you do it right, but can be much more costly if you don't do it right.

It is not realistic to get a decent offshore boat for under 15K. You could probably get something for that, but it isn't going to be reliable. If you get serious about it and decide to purchase a boat that is dedicated for offshore, I would highly recommend twin motors. You can get a single outboard engine, still go, and have a lot of fun. You just have to pick your days. A good VHF and EBIRB is a must have because if you go enough something will eventually break.

I am not trying to be a Debbie Downer, just giving my honest thoughts on the subject.
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Old 07-29-2021, 09:37 PM   #5
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All good info. Thanks
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Old 07-29-2021, 09:43 PM   #6
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I ran a 23 ft Boston whaler single engine outrage for about 10 years, fuel was my main concern, so I replaced the fuel tank to 150 gallon and repowered with a 250 Yamaha
It was a very steady workhorse, $15000 is cutting it thin, I concentrated on superb electronics and redundancy, 2 gps , 2 vhf , 2 different frequency depth finders
Don’t be afraid to search for boats out of state ( Florida, Alabama, North Carolina) good luck
With your search twinvee cat makes a great boat if you want to run smaller twin engine boat, speed = higher budget and maintenance, trip cost

Last edited by S-3 Ranch; 07-29-2021 at 09:51 PM.
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Old 07-29-2021, 09:45 PM   #7
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You can easily get a seaworthy offshore boat for $25-30k with twins but it wonít be fast or fancy but they all catch fish if you know what you are doing. For many years a single outboard was all anyone used for 20-30 mile trips. I would also look into seatow or towboat USA if you go that route. Get a solid marine radio and antenna or satellite phone and you are good.


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Old 07-29-2021, 09:48 PM   #8
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Good advice
I always wanted to get one when I retire but I would need to move to Venice or south Florida to justify using it. You don’t have enough good weather days in Texas to justify spending that much money. My opinion now is to buy a bay boat and move to the coast after I retire and get a lot more use out of it.
You could pay for an offshore trip several times a year and still catch your fish and have lots of fun and fill the freezer. You would get 10 times the use out of a bay boat here in Texas

In Florida or Venice you make a 20 or 40 mile trip. Texas it’s 60 to a 100+.
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Old 07-29-2021, 09:54 PM   #9
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Man for 5k you can make some trips “ off shore” fish and make sure that’s what you want to do. The sea ain’t allways kind.
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Old 07-29-2021, 09:55 PM   #10
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I have a 31’ mako I’d make you a heck of a deal on. Needs a little tlc
361-215-3690
Shoot me a text if interested
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Old 07-29-2021, 09:56 PM   #11
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I’ve broken down out there 3 times with single engine boats things do happen.I’ve got a 24 ft dusky at moment with single engine but 2 trolling motors mounted on foot.It’s kinda a sick feeling being in the middle of no where and just drifting.If I stay in offshore game I’ll be getting a twin engine boat I’m getting to old and sick for the adventures. Things can get ugly fast out there passed a kidney stone 30 miles out I thought I was going to die.60 miles is a long way out I’d plan on spending a lot more than 15 to go out that far.
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Old 07-29-2021, 09:58 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jkennedy26 View Post
I have a 31í mako Iíd make you a heck of a deal on. Needs a little tlc
361-215-3690
Shoot me a text if interested
Not to steal it from the OP but if heís not interested I may be.
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Old 07-29-2021, 09:59 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Killer View Post
Good advice
I always wanted to get one when I retire but I would need to move to Venice or south Florida to justify using it. You donít have enough good weather days in Texas to justify spending that much money. My opinion now is to buy a bay boat and move to the coast after I retire and get a lot more use out of it.
You could pay for an offshore trip several times a year and still catch your fish and have lots of fun and fill the freezer. You would get 10 times the use out of a bay boat here in Texas

In Florida or Venice you make a 20 or 40 mile trip. Texas itís 60 to a 100+.
Yep a 20ft center console with a large fuel tank or removable 25 gallon spare tank can be used in both bay and gulf ,
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Old 07-29-2021, 10:05 PM   #14
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I have a 26 Andros I take offshore often but I pick my days and there honestly aren’t that many each year that I’d go in a 42 Freeman I wouldn’t go in my Andros. I don’t enjoy 2.5+ in any boat.

Really all depends on how often you can go when it’s right and how much you can tolerate on cost. I figure a minimum of $300 every time I go and my boat lives on a lift, be more if you’re trailering. This week was prime but I couldn’t get away, weather holds we’ll make a run sat. It gets in your blood, I’m straight addicted to blue water and flyfishing, luckily my bride and grown kids are too.
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Old 07-29-2021, 10:08 PM   #15
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It seems to be rough most of the year. July-September is generally pretty good weather but there are no guarantees. I run a 33’ that will handle some pretty rough conditions but fuel consumption goes way up and range goes way down. My next boat will be 40+. If you can’t fix it don’t buy it because something is always broken. If you have to take it to a shop you have at least a one month wait. If that month starts mid July you miss a big portion of your best weather. With that said when you have weather like this week you can have some epic trips. I spend probably 3 days on maintenance for everyday I fish between the boat and trailer. It keeps the boat ready and in top condition.
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Old 07-29-2021, 10:13 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by warrington View Post
Cost a lot
Lot of upkeep
Need two + engines to be safe
Not good for skiiing etc


Positive
Offshore fishing is fun
This is pretty much dead on, don't know why the skiing was thrown in there. I will add, burns a lot of fuel.

If you let them sit, thinking I don't have the time or money to go out now, and do that for six months or more. When you do decide to go out, you will wind up spending two or three weekends fixing the boat up, so it is able to go out again. As long as you keep using them, things don't rot so bad. When you let them sit, the will rot and fall apart. I rebuilt our boats multiple times.
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Old 07-29-2021, 10:14 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by Jkennedy26 View Post
I have a 31í mako Iíd make you a heck of a deal on. Needs a little tlc
361-215-3690
Shoot me a text if interested
That would be a dream, if I lived on the coast still and could really make use of it.
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Old 07-29-2021, 10:21 PM   #18
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The major negatives are the price of the game and the limited days that are fishable. I don't know what you do for a living and what your schedule is like but you really need to be able to drop everything and go when it gets right. You can't really just plan on fishing offshore on the weekend or two a month that you have free. You'll rarely get to go and you will sit at work sick watching the reports of flat seas and huge catches only to be greeted by 4-6'ers on the weekend.

The cost to really do it right is up there. Everything related to offshore fishing is expensive. A decent boat that will do a good job offshore is going to be way more than $15k. You can find old boats for that but then how reliable will they be? I can almost guarantee they will be money pits with never ending issues in that price range. $15k doesn't get you much in the boat world.

The other con is that it is a whole lot of work. Getting ready, keeping the boat up and then cleaning up after fishing. Everyone wants to go offshore fishing when you have a boat. Everyone is willing to throw you some gas money. But none of them really understand what that trip really costs. Throwing a few $20's in the hat for gas money isn't even beginning to scratch the surface. And not many want to stick around to scrub the boat and get it cleaned up and put away after the trip is over.

The positive is that it's fun. It's exciting. If it's your thing it's worth the headaches and money.
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Old 07-29-2021, 10:24 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by warrington View Post
Cost a lot
Lot of upkeep
Need two + engines to be safe
Not good for skiiing etc


Positive
Offshore fishing is fun

two + engines is unnecessary
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Old 07-29-2021, 10:32 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by Eatíem Up View Post
It seems to be rough most of the year. July-September is generally pretty good weather but there are no guarantees. I run a 33í that will handle some pretty rough conditions but fuel consumption goes way up and range goes way down. My next boat will be 40+. If you canít fix it donít buy it because something is always broken. If you have to take it to a shop you have at least a one month wait. If that month starts mid July you miss a big portion of your best weather. With that said when you have weather like this week you can have some epic trips. I spend probably 3 days on maintenance for everyday I fish between the boat and trailer. It keeps the boat ready and in top condition.
Yes, this is very accurate. Taking a small boat out when the waves are big, results in you using a lot of throttle and burning fuel, like someone took a hole saw to your gas tank. If you do get a smaller boat to take out which, I would not take out 60 miles. Add a lot of fuel capacity, or you may wind up in Mississippi, Mexico or Africa, you really never know. If I was going out 60 miles, I would want at least a 28 ft. boat, 35 ft. would be a lot better. The longer and deeper the hull, the better it will handle those big waves, you won't burn as much fuel.

I can tell you crazy stories about taking our 21 ft. boat out, when the waves were big. It was fun, but we went through fuel fast. Then there were a couple of times we or I almost sent the boat to the bottom very quickly. One situation was pretty wild and crazy, but we survived, we came very close to not surviving. It was a result of having to use a lot of throttle to get up a wave, then gave it too much and wound up catching a lot of air, then slammed forward hard, when we landed. Slammed the throttle wide open, then launched off of another wave wide open. That was a very hard landing. Then finally was able to pull my self up enough to slam the throttle shut, as we were going up the third wave. When you do that, the bow dives. HARD! Now what you want to do when going up a huge wave. We went through the wave, literally. I was on the floor of the boat looking up and saw we punched a hole through the wave, there was probably 10 ft. of wave above us. I about sh1t, I just kind of froze. It was cool looking, at the same time being extremely scary. Thinking as soon as the boat slowed enough, all that water was going to fill the hole we just punched, when that happened we were going straight to the bottom. We punched out the other side of the wave. So it was very cool stuff, but I ain't going to try that again.

For big water, you should get a big boat.
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Old 07-30-2021, 01:20 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by K. Lane View Post
two + engines is unnecessary
LOL

while I done off shore with a single engine boat more times than one with twins I couldnt disagree more. When we did it, boats with twins wasnt that common for the average man. Now days twins are as common as VHF radio back in the day. Hell theyre building boats with 6 400s now

The only way to consistently fish the range the OP is talking about with a single engine boat is with a buddy boat or a good sat phone and tow boat policy.
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Old 07-30-2021, 01:49 AM   #22
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I'm headed out offshore tomorrow in my favorite boat....someone else's.

I packed a small overnight bag, my fanny pack tackle box, and my wallet for gas money.

My boat and its two motors will be safely tucked away in its lift.
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Old 07-30-2021, 03:48 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by jhunter77 View Post
I keep getting the itch to get an offshore boat. I love it out there, and this last week was great conditions. Tell me the pros and cons, and what to look for in a used boat. I see lots of boats in the 10 to 15k range that appear sea worthy/reliable. Is that realistic? I would want to be able to run out around 60miles.
It is absolutely not realistic. There is no $10k to $15k boat sea worthy to travel 10nm into the gulf, let alone 60.
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Old 07-30-2021, 05:42 AM   #24
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I ran a 23 ft Boston whaler single engine outrage for about 10 years, fuel was my main concern, so I replaced the fuel tank to 150 gallon and repowered with a 250 Yamaha
It was a very steady workhorse, $15000 is cutting it thin, I concentrated on superb electronics and redundancy, 2 gps , 2 vhf , 2 different frequency depth finders
Don’t be afraid to search for boats out of state ( Florida, Alabama, North Carolina) good luck
With your search twinvee cat makes a great boat if you want to run smaller twin engine boat, speed = higher budget and maintenance, trip cost
I like the twin vees, one nice thing about the cat style boats is the twin motors are less HP due to the ride characteristics of that style of boat. We went way off shore Florida panhandle, 26 ft cat style with twin 140 hp susuki's, a mono hull would have been twin 200's if not more. Guide has lived there his whole life. Boats I'm looking at are around $100k

Last edited by friscopaint; 07-30-2021 at 05:48 AM.
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Old 07-30-2021, 05:45 AM   #25
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Guys I know went offshore with guide out of Galveston, hit a floating log on the way out and limped back on the other engine, took out lower end on one motor. I like redundancy when it comes to something like that.
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Old 07-30-2021, 05:52 AM   #26
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The hidden cost is, as Capt Glenn said, the time. Always something needing to be cleaned, tightened, replaced, maintained. Bigger boat means bigger expenses. And itís not just the boat that requires maintenance, itís the trailer, and storage cost. For 15k, you are likely to get a boat thatís in great condition with engines that need to be replaced (likely another $30k+ minimum).


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Old 07-30-2021, 05:54 AM   #27
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Not a chance i would go offshore with a single engine $15k boat.


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Old 07-30-2021, 06:03 AM   #28
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IMHO for offshore your budget needs to be double that plus.
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Old 07-30-2021, 07:48 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by K. Lane View Post
two + engines is unnecessary
Absolutely not... just carry extra paddles so the whole crew can get in on the fun
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Old 07-30-2021, 07:55 AM   #30
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IMO if you’re on a budget you should not own an offshore boat.

Charter with professionals on a big boat and enjoy the fishing. This way you don’t have to worry about the mountain of work and money involved. Maintainence, cleaning, repair, insurance, etc.
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Old 07-30-2021, 08:44 AM   #31
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Do you two understand the definition of UNNECESSARY?
I didn’t say it wasn’t a good idea.

Besides.....with his mentioned budget.....he ain’t gettin an offshore boat with 2 engines on it.


The chances of a newer, well maintained RUNNING boat engine just dying is very small.

A TON of boats go out and back in EVERY **** DAY with a single engine.

Bad fuel, water in fuel and battery issues are the biggest problems that cause issues. Make sure you have a 3 bank charger and 2 or 3 batteries one of them is dedicated to electronics the other(s) to the engine and spare

Carry (on top of having a sat phone, and an EPRIB) a set of basic tools, a new water separator, maybe a new fuel line.

I, when I still had my boat, always carried spare gas from a different gas station from where I filled up my boat. I’ll do it with the new boat I have ordered that I’ll pick up after the first of the year
If you have a boat that has 2 fuel tanks... fill em up at different fuel stations
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Old 07-30-2021, 08:45 AM   #32
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Absolutely not... just carry extra paddles so the whole crew can get in on the fun


And maybe carry a volleyball on board so they can have a mascot
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Old 07-30-2021, 08:59 AM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jhunter77 View Post
I keep getting the itch to get an offshore boat. I love it out there, and this last week was great conditions. Tell me the pros and cons, and what to look for in a used boat. I see lots of boats in the 10 to 15k range that appear sea worthy/reliable. Is that realistic? I would want to be able to run out around 60miles.
I'd be willing to bet the boats you saw in that price range are over 20 years old, and are single engine. If you were going to fish inshore, I'd say go for it, but to go out 60 miles that would be risky IMO.

Pros of used boat - not paying full price of something that depreciates

Cons - an old boat could need a lot of work, and have hidden problems such as transom replacement, or stringer replacement.


If you could bump your budget up, the best place to find a solid boat would be Miami. Or, find the used boat you like, and have it overhauled.

Check out this lady's 26' boat that was restored -

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Old 07-30-2021, 09:06 AM   #34
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Originally Posted by kingfisher_jr View Post
Realistically, you would be extremely lucky to find anything seaworthy to 60 miles for 15K. Probably looking more like at least 4X that (if lucky) for a decent offshore boat that is steadily realizably for 60 mile trips. In my opinion reliability is the number 1 concern in a offshore boat and that means twin outboards. I have made many trips in single outboard bay boats, and still do, but the conditions have to be perfect and I try not to go past ~30 miles on a perfect day. That's with a nice bay boat, VHF radios, and a EBIRB. Even on our offshore boat with twin outboards, things still happen. I have lost an outboard for various reasons about 5 times. That's in a hundred+ trips, but things do happen. It is extremely nice to have that other motor when things go south. Even with quality machinery and regular maintenance, things happen. In my opinion all that you can do is minimize the amount of times things do happen and be prepared when they do.

To simply answer the question, in all honesty and my own personal opinion.

The Pro's are: It's fun. You get to make great memories. Deep water fish fight more, get bigger, and taste better. (Plus you never know what your gonna catch out there.)

The Con's: It's expensive if you do it right, but can be much more costly if you don't do it right.

It is not realistic to get a decent offshore boat for under 15K. You could probably get something for that, but it isn't going to be reliable. If you get serious about it and decide to purchase a boat that is dedicated for offshore, I would highly recommend twin motors. You can get a single outboard engine, still go, and have a lot of fun. You just have to pick your days. A good VHF and EBIRB is a must have because if you go enough something will eventually break.

I am not trying to be a Debbie Downer, just giving my honest thoughts on the subject.

Solid post here, very well said.

OP if you go single engine, try to plan it with a buddy or one of the FB groups to run together. That way you can help each other if things go south.
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Old 07-30-2021, 09:07 AM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K. Lane View Post
Do you two understand the definition of UNNECESSARY?
I didnít say it wasnít a good idea.

Besides.....with his mentioned budget.....he ainít gettin an offshore boat with 2 engines on it.


The chances of a newer, well maintained RUNNING boat engine just dying is very small.

A TON of boats go out and back in EVERY **** DAY with a single engine.

Bad fuel, water in fuel and battery issues are the biggest problems that cause issues. Make sure you have a 3 bank charger and 2 or 3 batteries one of them is dedicated to electronics the other(s) to the engine and spare

Carry (on top of having a sat phone, and an EPRIB) a set of basic tools, a new water separator, maybe a new fuel line.

I, when I still had my boat, always carried spare gas from a different gas station from where I filled up my boat. Iíll do it with the new boat I have ordered that Iíll pick up after the first of the year
If you have a boat that has 2 fuel tanks... fill em up at different fuel stations
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Old 07-30-2021, 10:19 AM   #36
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Old 07-30-2021, 10:20 AM   #37
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Originally Posted by Quackerbox View Post
LOL

while I done off shore with a single engine boat more times than one with twins I couldnt disagree more. When we did it, boats with twins wasnt that common for the average man. Now days twins are as common as VHF radio back in the day. Hell theyre building boats with 6 400s now

The only way to consistently fish the range the OP is talking about with a single engine boat is with a buddy boat or a good sat phone and tow boat policy.
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Originally Posted by Mexico View Post
Absolutely not... just carry extra paddles so the whole crew can get in on the fun
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Originally Posted by Quackerbox View Post

That’s a good one and a funny one... I’ll have to save that meme for my book of faces post that upset folks
Made me laugh out loud a bit
But no sir, not triggered
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Old 07-30-2021, 11:15 AM   #38
AtTheWall
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Back in 1984 up to 1987 / I and a old Coast Guard friend / ran a 24ft Aquasport center console - powered by a pair of 70 hp - 2 stroke Mercury's out of Chincoteague Island Virginia and the Assateague Island/Chicoteague Island and Wallops Island inlet (three islands shared this common classic east coast - se facing hooked inlet

This inlet is identical in direction and layout as the inlet below Hatteras Island at Wanchese Inlet North Carolina.

Anyone who runs these inlets - along undeveloped barrier islands along the eastern seaboard know, it can be seriously whacked - running inbound with a following sea.

We ran 60 - 80 miles out into the Baltimore Canyon - trolling for white marlin, tuna, mahi, makos and the infamous blue marlin. No GPS - no loran c - compass and waterproof charts with a depth finder. Those longer range trips, we ran with another companion boat, just for coverage and sharing fishing data. Two working the Gulf Stream eddies there, spin offs of the stream into the southbound currents of the North Atlantic, much like the Mexican Baja, you are playing surface water temp games - to rig baits. Cooler = tuna / warmer = marlin and mahi et al.

We made it work, wore our Coast Guard gear for water and floatation management (immersion), and both of us were trained and worked the old navigational tools and ways of days gone by professionally, so finding our way home was not a serious concern. We knew how to offset for gulf stream 2.5 - 3 knot flows as we worked courses on timed bearings.

The boat was heavy, well made, like a whaler and the power astern, dual outboards with 150 gallon fuel load aboard. Being smaller engines, with a 2 stroke design and running pre mix, we managed the fuel load round trip with fuel to spare.

Offshore, you cut and tilt one engine, when you are running slow and rotate them, so one is off and idle as the other is plugging away. This increases your fuel load tremendously - but each boat and power combo, has different specs. Must run and measure - various speeds - to develop the best fuel burn to sail ratio.

EPIRB a must
Federal Tuna tag a must (if you go out there - blackfin will eventually cross paths with you)
PFDs and safety gear - waterproof electronics (handheld)
Download navigation apps for smart phones - use them as backup to your boats primary gear and become versant running without electronics - only compass - till you become truly confident in your skills (backup to electronics - so many don't know basics anymore because the unit on the console is the crutch)

Your price points - are just covering a sea worthy (WELL USED) - offshore hull of the low economic, fisherman and work boat variety, offshore (no bling but sound hull). Weight in the hull is your friend offshore, as long as it's designed, to cut water a low speed, with a low throttle - when it gets nasty. And finding out your fuel burns at slow speeds, is harder to develop, than running fast and or up on plane.

Offshore - you must plan trips and fuel loads based on some basic numbers - and knowing your RETURN TO BASE (RTB) number, when the fuel load to get home is tight......and equipment may not be 100%......including the second engine.

Old Makos, SeaOx'es, Whalers, Grady White, Pursuit - etc. Old glass scrim, heavier hulls with different hull build technologies - just bare - you may find one under 20 k and even down into the 10 k range.

Power - dual engines - weight in the hull and onboard fuel tanks, low power becomes a drag and drain but too much engine, you really can't bust 30-40 mph out there, when its at the 2-4ft chop level. Boats up to 60ft, in water like that, you start working throttles, and trim tabs if you have them, to work over the bigger sets of 2-4......in side 2-4 are 7ft waves - the rogues.....and it is these sets, that make any boat less than 80ft, a timing thing for ride and control.

You will get wet - another factor of out there in center console boats - less than 30ft hulls

Last edited by AtTheWall; 07-30-2021 at 11:27 AM.
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Old 07-30-2021, 11:44 AM   #39
AtTheWall
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Found an image of an Aquasport of the same style we ran there, for sale in NY State for 13k (old ad from the 2000s).

Note the stern - deep vee with the trim tabs

This boat is single engine - we ran smaller 70hp 2 strokes - they fit side by side on this transom because, they were small enough to fit and work. And a pair of 2 stroke 70s, are reliable and lighter, with less full burn once you got the hull up on plane - not super fast - but out there, you don't win any races.

Hull design - study this classic bow rake and deadrise as it vee's off the stern. They rock a bit more with a side swell but, they slice thru waves for smaller hulls, with remarkable control and hold with a bit of weight with the older glass used in boat designs of this era (tanks literally)

Boats today - CONTENDER - fit this kind of profile (many others are similar- just named Contender because I rode one, which had similar feel). You have to feel the hull - when it gets really on - so you can best fit the boats setup to deal with the conditions (power and headway with swell and wind directions - with relationship to course management etc).

Must plan for the worse and sail on the best days.
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Old 07-30-2021, 12:13 PM   #40
joey1656
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I used to take my old man's v20 wellcraft with single 150 evinrude 65 miles out. I came back with amberjack and grouper and he like to kick my butt! LOL.

As I have grown older and somewhat wiser, i now have a 25' with twin motors that are new. I would never recommend doing what I used to do in a single screw boat.
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Old 07-30-2021, 12:35 PM   #41
jhunter77
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All good advice. I dont mind bumping my budget up, but want to be one of those guys with a boat that is worthless in a few years and it becomes pasture art. I do all my own work. But know some of the computer stuff on today's outboards are dealer only computer programs. I normally get to go with friends, bait and fuel cost are only part of it. Rolling up your sleeves and doing clean up, wash down are just as important. I have seen others get to go, pay a little fuel and be ready to hit the AC. Also nothing any worse than folks that dont bring their own gear and trash, or dont take care of the tackle that was loaned. I like going with other folks, but they at times are not dependable. I was hoping a boat would allow me more time offshore. I also have been on invite trips and had to limp in from 40miles out. Lol even with a guide things dont go as planned always. Had one fill up about 15 miles out and then the bilge pumps would not work. Sunk the cowling about half way down in the water..... bailed like crazy while the captain kept it floored and we sloshed back. Finally got the bilge pumps going when we saw the jetties. Was able to get on plane when we came through the breakers...I like to be in control and make sure those trips dont repeat themselves.
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Old 07-30-2021, 01:04 PM   #42
HTOWN
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Get you a boat, join the club, 1 or 3 motors. What ever you can afford. Just make sure it's sea worthy. Get your the proper safety gear. Make sure every one comes home safe.
If you are wanting to run out 60, you'll probably want to run out 80 or 90 before yo know it, then it's a tuna trip.. just sayin.

1 motor isn't the best, but if u have to, have fun. Alot of people do it. Pick your calm days and have fun.
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Old 07-30-2021, 01:10 PM   #43
CaptainDave
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As stated, it's not realistic to get a 60 mile type of range craft for that type of budget. I do agree that size of boats these days can be a bit overrated. 25 years ago, a 26' with twin outboards used to be considered a decent offshore vessel out of Galveston. Fast forward to today and it's 30+ with trip outboards. Heck there's center console boats pushing 40' with quads.

Boats like AtTheWall posted would be the closest to budget. However, still not exactly ideal for that kind of range. If single powered, you can get a kicker mount for the stern and buy a kicker motor to give a little piece of mind. Regardless, a kicker isn't getting you in very fast, nor if you are having engine problems and the weather is turning bad.

Don't get me wrong, plenty of people go out of Galveston/Freeboard in 20-24' deep V boats, single powered. We aren't talking 60 + miles, more like less than 40. Lots of those types of boats out on the very calm summer days. We used to venture out to the Buccaneer fields a couple times each snapper season in 22'. Again, that's not serious offshore fishing...more like heading out for a few drops for snapper, trolling for a few kings, mahi, Ling maybe, etc.

If you were serious about wanting to go out 60 miles, I'd say 25/26' with twin outboards is the minimum. Closer to 30 would be better. You also want large enough outboards that you can plane with one motor if the need arises.

But even with that, as mentioned, having the flexibility to pick up and go on calm days is a huge factor. If it's too rough for a 24' boat, the guy with the 30' probably isn't heading out either. This does not go well for a weekend warrior with limited days to begin with.
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Old 07-30-2021, 01:50 PM   #44
AtTheWall
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South Florida - both sides of the peninsula - are your prime shopping zones right now.


Here's one - ran it a bit out there as well as down the ICW from Louisiana, when it was initially bought used, from a seller in Cajun country who really wasn't tuned for offshore fishing. The seller used the boat near the Chandelier Islands as a floating speckled trout setup, for multi-day trips with his family.

Has a galley, head and shower, dual controls - the entire offshore bling - used - under 30k

And running her in seas over 5ft, as it is with anything less than 60ft offshore, you have to feather her ride or beat her to death cover the chop, the Gulf of Mexico is so known for.

Has an onboard diesel auxiliary generator, with the pre-mix tank, used for diesel instead of covering the outboards.

32ft Century - setup for offshore - dual 2 stroke older gen yammies - rated for offshore power

300 gallon fuel cell - since the pre-mix tanks were reallocated for diesel auxiliary generator power, the fuel had to be pre-mixed, when you tanked her up. Let's just say it takes literally a rocket scientist, to track fuel burn and oil mixtures, for large amounts of refuels. And the problem with pre-mix, those computers used in engines today, need to adjust the oil/gas mixtures on the fly, to keep power efficient and clean.

This boat ran a bit rich, always carry plugs, tools and basic stuff to cover - just in case you need to trouble shoot a power plant.

For offshore with gas, you will shop the biggest fuel tank you can buy to cover.




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Old 07-30-2021, 01:50 PM   #45
jhunter77
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I threw 60 out as the farthest I would consider on a calm day....30mph that's 2 hours out. That's about my max time offshore. That's a decent weather window If something pops up that was not in the weather forecast or radar when you headed out.
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Old 07-30-2021, 02:00 PM   #46
S-3 Ranch
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Yeah boats have gotten out of control ^^^^^ now days, millions of boats around the world
Are making trips on a single engine and never think twice ,in Texas it is rather humbling to be @ a 30knot cruise and
Some guy comes blasting by @ 50 knots with 3 300hp ( LOL)
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Old 07-30-2021, 02:03 PM   #47
AtTheWall
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I threw 60 out as the farthest I would consider on a calm day....30mph that's 2 hours out. That's about my max time offshore. That's a decent weather window If something pops up that was not in the weather forecast or radar when you headed out.
Yup - there's a few spots in that range from Port A, that have some seriously big fish - a few of us tied into a few years ago out there - a bit over 60 miles. Put a 400lb swordfish in the boat with three smaller fish.

And any boat that is sized to run safely, 150 mile round trip (60 out 60 in and buffer) with the fuel load to do it, puts you into water deep enough for these swordfish.
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Old 07-30-2021, 03:22 PM   #48
HTOWN
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Yup - there's a few spots in that range from Port A, that have some seriously big fish - a few of us tied into a few years ago out there - a bit over 60 miles. Put a 400lb swordfish in the boat with three smaller fish.

And any boat that is sized to run safely, 150 mile round trip (60 out 60 in and buffer) with the fuel load to do it, puts you into water deep enough for these swordfish.

Sword fish, ask Chase This about catching catfish, he knows what's up. I only catch the little ones he leaves behind
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Old 07-30-2021, 03:57 PM   #49
AtTheWall
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Century boats and Pangas

I bet most here, never knew, Yamaha owned them both?

Panga's were designed and built by Yamaha - during the late 60s = to sell and influence island and coastal third world countries, with boats that can and will, bust out thru the surf and over a shallow inshore coastal reef, fish for food offshore and return.

PANGA BOATS ARE A YAMAHA MARINE DIVISION IDEA AND INVENTION and they in turn, became the front runners of providing engines and hulls, for all coastal fishing people of the world, in tropical coastal zones. The boat of choice running the surf and offshore scenes along the Pacific coat of Mexico all the way down to Argentina.

And by gosh - that is exactly what transpired!

And Century boats, was Yamaha's offshore boat division, back in those days as well. DUKE was a Yamaha powered, rigged and outfitted boat, by YAMAHA's CENTURY MARINE DIVISION.
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Old 07-30-2021, 04:10 PM   #50
DedDuk
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Thats a lot of private charters worth of boat.
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