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Old 02-07-2019, 10:40 AM   #1
BlakeJ
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Default I think I'm done with turnips

I just can't get the deer to eat them. Even on cold years like last year. Not worth the hassle.
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Old 02-07-2019, 11:26 AM   #2
GoneSouth
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Don’t give up on them, the deer will eventually eat them. The benefits they provide to your soil are worth it regardless of wether or not deer eat them
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Old 02-07-2019, 11:28 AM   #3
krtnorris
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Sooner or later the big bucks will turnip!
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Old 02-07-2019, 11:33 AM   #4
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I never had any luck with them either. I had my best success in food plots with clover and wheat.
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Old 02-07-2019, 11:52 AM   #5
Walker
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I wont eat turnips either.
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Old 02-07-2019, 11:54 AM   #6
lovemylegacy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakeJ View Post
I just can't get the deer to eat them. Even on cold years like last year. Not worth the hassle.
Use a different type. Some Brassicas are bitter. Try radishes, sugar beets or some type of tuberless brassica such as Rape. They are sweet and very tasty, ask me how I know.
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Old 02-07-2019, 11:56 AM   #7
N.DaWoods
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Have you ever eaten turnips? Do you blame them? I am just messing. I too had trouble getting them to eat them, then one really cold day, I looked out my window of the house down to the foodplot that only had turnips left and a beautiful buck was solo down there mowing them down. He was the only deer I ever saw in them. I mostly have tried mixes and if turnips are in them, I will plant, if the mix doesnt have them, then I dont. Good luck.
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Old 02-07-2019, 12:33 PM   #8
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To turnip, or not to turnip, that is the question !





I ain't ever had a deer, or even a hog, eat the tops or the tubers. Daikon radish for the win !
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Old 02-07-2019, 12:37 PM   #9
ctom87
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovemylegacy View Post
Use a different type. Some Brassicas are bitter. Try radishes, sugar beets or some type of tuberless brassica such as Rape. They are sweet and very tasty, ask me how I know.
Not in the lease bit a farmer myself...but...is there really a type of turnip called...rape?

Edit: would Google to find out but on a work computer.
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Old 02-07-2019, 12:41 PM   #10
camoclad
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It's not always about food value. Turnips and other tuber plants are irreplaceable to SOIL nutrition, which in turn produces other preferred plants for deer. See Elgato and his thread, a year in the life of a farm.
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Old 02-07-2019, 08:41 PM   #11
lovemylegacy
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Originally Posted by ctom87 View Post
Not in the lease bit a farmer myself...but...is there really a type of turnip called...rape?

Edit: would Google to find out but on a work computer.
No there isn't, but there is a Brassica that is called Rape. It has no turnip or tuber and it isn't bitter and deer love it.

Check out QDMA and its article on "Forage Rape for deer", it is also called Brassica Napus

Last edited by lovemylegacy; 02-07-2019 at 08:46 PM.
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Old 02-08-2019, 02:52 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Regular7 View Post
Donít give up on them, the deer will eventually eat them. The benefits they provide to your soil are worth it regardless of wether or not deer eat them
What are the benefits?
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Old 02-09-2019, 08:27 AM   #13
lovemylegacy
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What are the benefits?
In deep Winter sometimes that's the only thing that will grow and they are healthy food for the deer. A better benefit from greens/turnips is when you plow them under they are an excellent natural fertilizer. I plant a blend that has a Brassica in it and it is sweet to the taste, deer will eat it as soon as it comes out of the ground. Its scientific name is Brassica napus, aka Rape or Rapeseed. It is awesome choice for a plot.


This past Fall, the deer wiped it out of my plots, first time I had seen that.
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Old 02-09-2019, 08:49 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovemylegacy View Post
In deep Winter sometimes that's the only thing that will grow and they are healthy food for the deer. A better benefit from greens/turnips is when you plow them under they are an excellent natural fertilizer. I plant a blend that has a Brassica in it and it is sweet to the taste, deer will eat it as soon as it comes out of the ground. Its scientific name is Brassica napus, aka Rape or Rapeseed. It is awesome choice for a plot.


This past Fall, the deer wiped it out of my plots, first time I had seen that.
Where do you get this Calvin and how much it is?
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Old 02-09-2019, 08:57 AM   #15
camoclad
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovemylegacy View Post
In deep Winter sometimes that's the only thing that will grow and they are healthy food for the deer. A better benefit from greens/turnips is when you plow them under they are an excellent natural fertilizer. I plant a blend that has a Brassica in it and it is sweet to the taste, deer will eat it as soon as it comes out of the ground. Its scientific name is Brassica napus, aka Rape or Rapeseed. It is awesome choice for a plot.


This past Fall, the deer wiped it out of my plots, first time I had seen that.
exactly

https://discussions.texasbowhunter.c...postcount=2265
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Old 02-09-2019, 09:15 AM   #16
lovemylegacy
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Its some stuff called BuckBuster. You can order it online. I drive to Sulfur La to get it. They also have a Spring blend if I remember right.

If you want some when it comes time to plant for the Fall, just let me know and I will get you a bag or 3. The Regular cost $30 sumptin, Premium is around $40. 50# bags.
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Old 02-10-2019, 08:08 PM   #17
Razrbk89
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Originally Posted by BlakeJ View Post
I just can't get the deer to eat them. Even on cold years like last year. Not worth the hassle.
In my experience, itís got to be cold enough for the ground to freeze for a few days before they really get into them. 20s-10s at night with highs in the mid 30s or lower will soften them up.

My deer really start hitting them after we have conditions like that, typically late November-early December. Theyíre almost gone, now. No telling how much tonnage they produce for me.
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Old 02-11-2019, 01:59 PM   #18
gingib
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I agree. WOn't plant them again
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Old 02-13-2019, 10:18 AM   #19
MQ32Shooter
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Man, my deer love turnips. But, I've been planting them for 10 years and they're used to them. Also put out Daikon radishes this year too. Deer seemed to like them also.
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Old 02-13-2019, 02:51 PM   #20
lovemylegacy
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I agree. WOn't plant them again
Don't be so quick to dump them. Lots of people use them. If you planted a Collared Green or Mustard Green then naturally they would not eat those as much since they are bitter.

Daikon Radishes, Sugar Beets, Rapeseed greens all are excellent choices. The Rapeseed is sweet, I have tasted them. The deer keep them ate down in all my plots, this year they completely eliminated them.

So don't be so quick to give up on them.
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Old 02-15-2019, 10:05 AM   #21
JeffK
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Rape is a pain in the but to me. This year I planted only oats so I could spray and kill the volunteer crop of Rape that keeps coming up every year. Deer will hammer it if it gets cold enough, but don't touch it much before then. Meanwhile it chokes out everything else including the oats.
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Old 02-15-2019, 06:47 PM   #22
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[QUOTE=JeffK;13994817]Rape is a pain in the but to me. This year I planted only oats so I could spray and kill the volunteer crop of Rape that keeps coming up every year. Deer will hammer it if it gets cold enough, but don't touch it much before then. Meanwhile it chokes out everything else including the oats.[/QUOTE

Wow! I have never seen mine over 6" tall. Deer start eating it as soon as it sprouts. All I have in my plots now is Winter Wheat and some clover. Rapeseed has been gone since Nov.
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Old 02-21-2019, 09:35 AM   #23
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i had a good stand of mixed turnips/sugarbeets come up a few years ago and was excited to see them all dug up and eaten and it never happened. i know they are beneficial so we will always throw some in the mix though. oats have been our best option for winter plots, they always keep them mowed down.
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Old 02-21-2019, 02:26 PM   #24
JeffK
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[quote=lovemylegacy;13995785]
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffK View Post
Rape is a pain in the but to me. This year I planted only oats so I could spray and kill the volunteer crop of Rape that keeps coming up every year. Deer will hammer it if it gets cold enough, but don't touch it much before then. Meanwhile it chokes out everything else including the oats.[/QUOTE

Wow! I have never seen mine over 6" tall. Deer start eating it as soon as it sprouts. All I have in my plots now is Winter Wheat and some clover. Rapeseed has been gone since Nov.
Had to google to make sure it was actually rape just now. Big dark green leaves and blooms yellow. Its been in the plot for close to 10 years, so deer have had a chance to get accustomed to it. It always gets 2 to 3' tall and only once I remember deer all of sudden strip it down during a cold spell.
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Old 02-21-2019, 03:13 PM   #25
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[quote=JeffK;14007436]
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovemylegacy View Post

Had to google to make sure it was actually rape just now. Big dark green leaves and blooms yellow. Its been in the plot for close to 10 years, so deer have had a chance to get accustomed to it. It always gets 2 to 3' tall and only once I remember deer all of sudden strip it down during a cold spell.
Seems odd to me that rape would continue to reseed for years. There is a weed that looks very similar to a brassica called garlic mustard. It fits the description , is hard to get rid of, and is flowering on my farm right now. Vigorous reseeder. Deer will occasionally browse it a little.
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Old 02-21-2019, 03:26 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovemylegacy View Post
Use a different type. Some Brassicas are bitter. Try radishes, sugar beets or some type of tuberless brassica such as Rape. They are sweet and very tasty, ask me how I know.
They usually take a few freezes to change to sweet
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Old 02-21-2019, 03:44 PM   #27
GoneSouth
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Originally Posted by Dusty Britches View Post
What are the benefits?
As they grow beneath the soil, they bust up/expand the soil allowing rain and nutrients to soak in rather than run off. They provide a source of green food in the dead of winter, and what isnít eaten both below and above ground will turn to excellent organic matter as it docomposes.

Everyone who is truly in the deer management game needs to pay close attention to what Elgato has going on.

The best deer eat the best crops, the best crops grow in the best soil. If you want the absolute most potential out of your deer, it has to start in the soil!
Or you can just feed 6 figures worth of double down and call it a day
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Old 02-22-2019, 09:31 AM   #28
JeffK
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[quote=elgato;14007519]
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffK View Post

Seems odd to me that rape would continue to reseed for years. There is a weed that looks very similar to a brassica called garlic mustard. It fits the description , is hard to get rid of, and is flowering on my farm right now. Vigorous reseeder. Deer will occasionally browse it a little.
Thanks elgato. Your probably right. Big dark leaves and flowering on stems that shoot up this time of year. And yes vigorous reseeder. My dad threw out a fall mix one year which Iím guessing how it was introduced.
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Old 02-22-2019, 09:32 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by krtnorris View Post
Sooner or later the big bucks will turnip!
That's punny
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Old 02-22-2019, 09:46 PM   #30
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[quote=JeffK;14009309]
Quote:
Originally Posted by elgato View Post

Thanks elgato. Your probably right. Big dark leaves and flowering on stems that shoot up this time of year. And yes vigorous reseeder. My dad threw out a fall mix one year which Iím guessing how it was introduced.
Here's a pic of what I'm calling garlic mustard. Blooms are either yellow, white or purple. Vigorous reseeder. Invasive. Looks much like a brassica
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Old 02-23-2019, 01:28 AM   #31
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Default I think I'm done with turnips

Another thing I havenít seen mentioned is making sure you have done a FULL soil test. Iím not talking about a PH, and NPK only test. Iím talking about one of the good ones.
A lot of times, if deer wonít eat a particular forage.. it is because the forage didnít develope a good taste. This can often be because of a lack of an important nutrient or because of an inhibiting circumstance such as PH imbalance.

CA, MG, and sulfur come to mind as minerals that can greatly effect palatability. Lack of available sulphur is often a cause of clover patches that deer wonít touch.


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Last edited by IkemanTX; 02-23-2019 at 01:34 AM.
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Old 02-23-2019, 03:56 AM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovemylegacy View Post
Don't be so quick to dump them. Lots of people use them. If you planted a Collared Green or Mustard Green then naturally they would not eat those as much since they are bitter.

Daikon Radishes, Sugar Beets, Rapeseed greens all are excellent choices. The Rapeseed is sweet, I have tasted them. The deer keep them ate down in all my plots, this year they completely eliminated them.

So don't be so quick to give up on them.
Tagged
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Old 02-23-2019, 06:28 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by krtnorris View Post
sooner or later the big bucks will turnip!
lol!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Old 02-23-2019, 07:19 AM   #34
bloodstick
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IkemanTX View Post
Another thing I havenít seen mentioned is making sure you have done a FULL soil test. Iím not talking about a PH, and NPK only test. Iím talking about one of the good ones.
A lot of times, if deer wonít eat a particular forage.. it is because the forage didnít develope a good taste. This can often be because of a lack of an important nutrient or because of an inhibiting circumstance such as PH imbalance.

CA, MG, and sulfur come to mind as minerals that can greatly effect palatability. Lack of available sulphur is often a cause of clover patches that deer wonít touch.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


This might explain why my plot of purpletop turnips were mowed over while my FIL who planted with the same seed, was left alone. This was our first year planting. Soil is bad. We need 4 tons of lime/acre to balance the PH.

His plot was amongst oak trees where we cleared all the pine recently. Mine was in the open. Both plots grew very well but mine was the only one that was browsed and the plots are within eyesight of each other.

The turnip tops were eatn down to the ground. The deer walked over oats and rhy to eat them. And lots of the pics were before it ever got really cold.














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Old 02-23-2019, 09:03 PM   #35
IkemanTX
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Another thing is palatability will be next to nothing if the plants are stressed. If you have yellowing leaves and it is not late season already, your stand ran out of nitrogen. Brassicas are very heavy nitrogen users as far as fall plots go. If they arenít following a good stand of legumes, you will definitely need supplemental fertilization.

Deer may not touch them for several years if there are other preferred food sources available all winter. The early stages of the turnip and radish growth has VERY bitter stages. If a deer first tries if in this time period, it may take a complete lack of other food sources before it gives it another try. Planting in a blend can help increase your chances of secondary tires from deer. If they are feeding in and around turnips already, they are more apt to try another bite, or catch a leaf accidentally with whatever else they were eating. A pure turnip stand may give them no reason to come back. A mix that we had unreal utilization with this year was cereal rye, winter wheat, turnips, daikon radish, white clover, and peas.

All you need is a single doe to decide it is a good food source for the rest of your herd to learn.


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Old 02-26-2019, 07:17 AM   #36
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My deer hammered the turnip greens. Nothing has eaten the turnips them selves. The really love the few dakon radishes that came up. Some areas of my turnip stayed really small and the “greens” were more purple, deer haven’t eaten them until lately. I’m assuming it’s areas where I didn’t get good fertilizer coverage.
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Old 02-27-2019, 07:23 PM   #37
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I have never had luck with turnip or radish. Had them as big as footballs with two foot a green on top and nothing ever touched them.


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Old 02-27-2019, 07:39 PM   #38
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I would agree with the deer, I would not eat them either or beets.
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Old 03-06-2019, 11:53 AM   #39
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I never had any luck with them either. I had my best success in food plots with clover and wheat.
Yup. Clover, oats, and wheat work well for me.
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