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Old 11-13-2018, 01:53 PM   #1
flounder9
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Exclamation Chronic wasting disease tse prion update

Greetings Texas Bow Hunters et al,

i thought i should post a cwd tse prion update here.

please don't let the blog scare you, the science is real, peer review in the blogs i post, and some confidential data. i do not advertise or make money from this, it's for educational use, please use as you wish. you need to be informed. make your own minds up with the science. legislative actions on cwd tse prion must be based on sound science.

here goes, it's not pretty, so don't shoot the messenger, i am full of holes...terry


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 03, 2018

Texas Reports 13 more cases of Chronic Wasting Disease CWD TSE Prion in Breeder Deer state total jumps to 130 Confirmed to date

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogs...f-chronic.html

in this next link, see the updated information on the cwd vaccine...terry

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2018

cwd, bse, scrapie, cjd, tse prion updated November 10 2018

https://chronic-wasting-disease.blog...n-updated.html


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2018

***> Norway New additional requirements for imports of hay and straw for animal feed from countries outside the EEA due to CWD TSE Prion

https://chronic-wasting-disease.blog...ments-for.html


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 04, 2018

***> Cervid to human prion transmission 5R01NS088604-04 Update

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogs...nsmission.html


kind regards, terry

Last edited by flounder9; 11-13-2018 at 01:54 PM. Reason: word spelling correction
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Old 11-13-2018, 02:28 PM   #2
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Flounder, the deer farmers here will hammer you too.

I myself appreciate your post on the subject.
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Old 11-13-2018, 04:35 PM   #3
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Most folks in Texas are just gonna stick their fingers in their ears and yell nananananana.
Scary stuff but not ready to freak out quite yet. But I will continue to have deer tested in hot zones.
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Old 11-13-2018, 04:52 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoof View Post
Most folks in Texas are just gonna stick their fingers in their ears and yell nananananana.
Scary stuff but not ready to freak out quite yet. But I will continue to have deer tested in hot zones.
and it doesn't help when idiots like Keith Warren are out their screaming it is all fake because he's getting paid by every deer breeder association in the country.
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Old 11-13-2018, 05:10 PM   #5
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It is scarry stuff
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Old 11-13-2018, 05:36 PM   #6
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Very scary. Need to strongly consider shutting down deer breeding. It’s probably in the wild population by now.


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Old 11-14-2018, 03:47 AM   #7
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Can someone please tell me who the first fatality is from this?

I would not eat meat from any obviously suspect/sick/staggering deer. Sure have eaten a bunch from other deer though!!!!
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Old 11-14-2018, 05:48 AM   #8
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I think the bigger picture is bringing CWD into Texas by deer breeders, knowing it’s going to jump into the wild population.


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Old 11-14-2018, 06:20 AM   #9
kyle1974
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Default Chronic wasting disease tse prion update

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brannon74 View Post
Very scary. Need to strongly consider shutting down deer breeding. It’s probably in the wild population by now.


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It’s been in the wild
Deer population for years. The only reason they find CWD cases in breeding ranches is because they’re testing almost 100 of the deer that die. The first CWD positive come
From a mule deer in West Texas. This isn’t a deer breeding problem it’s just easier to find in breeding facilities.

Ask the king ranch if they’re willing to pull brain stems from 100% of the deer that die or are killed in their ranch. They won’t because deep down, the last thing they want is a positive test coming off their place. So instead they’re going to sit on a board of experts and wave a flag saying they’re only trying to protect texas’ deer.... so again, why aren’t they testing?


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Last edited by kyle1974; 11-14-2018 at 06:23 AM.
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Old 11-14-2018, 09:37 AM   #10
flounder9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tejas Wildlife View Post
Can someone please tell me who the first fatality is from this?

I would not eat meat from any obviously suspect/sick/staggering deer. Sure have eaten a bunch from other deer though!!!!
there are many imo, one was too many for me i.e. mom hvcjd confirmed i.e. exceedingly rare sub strain of the infamous sporadic cjd's. science shows, and scientist believe, that cwd will look like sporadic cjd in humans. personally, i don't care what anyone eats, to each his own, bbbut, when what someone eats threatens my family down the line via friendly fire or the iatrogenic mode of transmission, then it is time to be concerned, imo. i am a meat eater, however, i don't want to eat tse prions, you should not either, tse prions can kill you...

just so's ya'll know, see;


the tse prion aka mad cow type disease is not your normal pathogen.

The TSE prion disease survives ashing to 600 degrees celsius, that’s around 1112 degrees farenheit.

you cannot cook the TSE prion disease out of meat.

you can take the ash and mix it with saline and inject that ash into a mouse, and the mouse will go down with TSE.

Prion Infected Meat-and-Bone Meal Is Still Infectious after Biodiesel Production as well.

the TSE prion agent also survives Simulated Wastewater Treatment Processes.

IN fact, you should also know that the TSE Prion agent will survive in the environment for years, if not decades.

you can bury it and it will not go away.

The TSE agent is capable of infected your water table i.e. Detection of protease-resistant cervid prion protein in water from a CWD-endemic area.

it’s not your ordinary pathogen you can just cook it out and be done with.

***> that’s what’s so worrisome about Iatrogenic mode of transmission, a simple autoclave will not kill this TSE prion agent.

1: J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1994 Jun;57(6):757-8

***> Transmission of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease to a chimpanzee by electrodes contaminated during neurosurgery.

Gibbs CJ Jr, Asher DM, Kobrine A, Amyx HL, Sulima MP, Gajdusek DC.

Laboratory of Central Nervous System Studies, National Institute of

Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health,

Bethesda, MD 20892.

Stereotactic multicontact electrodes used to probe the cerebral cortex of a middle aged woman with progressive dementia were previously implicated in the accidental transmission of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) to two younger patients. The diagnoses of CJD have been confirmed for all three cases. More than two years after their last use in humans, after three cleanings and repeated sterilisation in ethanol and formaldehyde vapour, the electrodes were implanted in the cortex of a chimpanzee. Eighteen months later the animal became ill with CJD. This finding serves to re-emphasise the potential danger posed by reuse of instruments contaminated with the agents of spongiform encephalopathies, even after scrupulous attempts to clean them.

PMID: 8006664 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/...?dopt=Abstract


Cervid to human prion transmission

Kong, Qingzhong

Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, United States

Abstract

Prion disease is transmissible and invariably fatal. Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is the prion disease affecting deer, elk and moose, and it is a widespread and expanding epidemic affecting 22 US States and 2 Canadian provinces so far. CWD poses the most serious zoonotic prion transmission risks in North America because of huge venison consumption (>6 million deer/elk hunted and consumed annually in the USA alone), significant prion infectivity in muscles and other tissues/fluids from CWD-affected cervids, and usually high levels of individual exposure to CWD resulting from consumption of the affected animal among often just family and friends. However, we still do not know whether CWD prions can infect humans in the brain or peripheral tissues or whether clinical/asymptomatic CWD zoonosis has already occurred, and we have no essays to reliably detect CWD infection in humans.

We hypothesize that:

(1) The classic CWD prion strain can infect humans at low levels in the brain and peripheral lymphoid tissues;

(2) The cervid-to-human transmission barrier is dependent on the cervid prion strain and influenced by the host (human) prion protein (PrP) primary sequence;

(3) Reliable essays can be established to detect CWD infection in humans; and

(4) CWD transmission to humans has already occurred. We will test these hypotheses in 4 Aims using transgenic (Tg) mouse models and complementary in vitro approaches.

Aim 1 will prove that the classical CWD strain may infect humans in brain or peripheral lymphoid tissues at low levels by conducting systemic bioassays in a set of humanized Tg mouse lines expressing common human PrP variants using a number of CWD isolates at varying doses and routes. Experimental human CWD samples will also be generated for Aim 3.

Aim 2 will test the hypothesis that the cervid-to-human prion transmission barrier is dependent on prion strain and influenced by the host (human) PrP sequence by examining and comparing the transmission efficiency and phenotypes of several atypical/unusual CWD isolates/strains as well as a few prion strains from other species that have adapted to cervid PrP sequence, utilizing the same panel of humanized Tg mouse lines as in Aim 1.

Aim 3 will establish reliable essays for detection and surveillance of CWD infection in humans by examining in details the clinical, pathological, biochemical and in vitro seeding properties of existing and future experimental human CWD samples generated from Aims 1-2 and compare them with those of common sporadic human Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) prions.

Aim 4 will attempt to detect clinical CWD-affected human cases by examining a significant number of brain samples from prion-affected human subjects in the USA and Canada who have consumed venison from CWD-endemic areas utilizing the criteria and essays established in Aim 3. The findings from this proposal will greatly advance our understandings on the potential and characteristics of cervid prion transmission in humans, establish reliable essays for CWD zoonosis and potentially discover the first case(s) of CWD infection in humans.

Public Health Relevance

There are significant and increasing human exposure to cervid prions because chronic wasting disease (CWD, a widespread and highly infectious prion disease among deer and elk in North America) continues spreading and consumption of venison remains popular, but our understanding on cervid-to-human prion transmission is still very limited, raising public health concerns. This proposal aims to define the zoonotic risks of cervid prions and set up and apply essays to detect CWD zoonosis using mouse models and in vitro methods. The findings will greatly expand our knowledge on the potentials and characteristics of cervid prion transmission in humans, establish reliable essays for such infections and may discover the first case(s) of CWD infection in humans.

Funding Agency

Agency

National Institute of Health (NIH)

Institute

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)

Type

Research Project (R01)

Project #

5R01NS088604-04

Application #

9517118

Study Section

Cellular and Molecular Biology of Neurodegeneration Study Section (CMND)

Program Officer Wong, May

Project Start 2015-09-30 Project End 2019-07-31 Budget Start 2018-08-01 Budget End 2019-07-31 Support Year 4 Fiscal Year 2018 Total Cost Indirect Cost Institution Name Case Western Reserve University Department Pathology Type Schools of Medicine DUNS # 077758407 City Cleveland State OH Country United States Zip Code 44106

Related projects

NIH 2018 R01 NS Cervid to human prion transmission Kong, Qingzhong / Case Western Reserve University

NIH 2017 R01 NS Cervid to human prion transmission Kong, Qingzhong / Case Western Reserve University

NIH 2016 R01 NS Cervid to human prion transmission Kong, Qingzhong / Case Western Reserve University

NIH 2015 R01 NS Cervid to human prion transmission Kong, Qingzhong / Case Western Reserve University $337,507


http://grantome.com/grant/NIH/R01-NS088604-04


Taken together, there is strong evidence of transmissibility of CWD orally into macaques and from macaque tissues into transgenic mouse models, although with an incomplete attack rate. The clinical and pathological presentation in macaques was mostly atypical, with a strong emphasis on spinal cord pathology. Our ongoing studies will show whether the transmission of CWD into macaques and passage in transgenic mice represents a form of non-adaptive prion amplification, and whether macaque-adapted prions have the potential to infect mice expressing human PrP. The notion that CWD can be transmitted orally into both new-world and old-world non-human primates asks for a careful reevaluation of the zoonotic risk of CWD.

***> The notion that CWD can be transmitted orally into both new-world and old-world non-human primates asks for a careful reevaluation of the zoonotic risk of CWD. <***

https://prion2018.org/

READING OVER THE PRION 2018 ABSTRACT BOOK, LOOKS LIKE THEY FOUND THAT from this study ;

P190 Human prion disease mortality rates by occurrence of chronic wasting disease in freeranging cervids, United States

Abrams JY (1), Maddox RA (1), Schonberger LB (1), Person MK (1), Appleby BS (2), Belay ED (1) (1) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Atlanta, GA, USA (2) Case Western Reserve University, National Prion Disease Pathology Surveillance Center (NPDPSC), Cleveland, OH, USA.

SEEMS THAT THEY FOUND Highly endemic states had a higher rate of prion disease mortality compared to non-CWD states.

AND ANOTHER STUDY;

P172 Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients with Prion Disease

Wang H(1), Cohen M(1), Appleby BS(1,2) (1) University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio (2) National Prion Disease Pathology Surveillance Center, Cleveland, Ohio..

IN THIS STUDY, THERE WERE autopsy-proven prion cases from the National Prion Disease Pathology Surveillance Center that were diagnosed between September 2016 to March 2017, AND included 104 patients.

SEEMS THEY FOUND THAT The most common sCJD subtype was MV1-2 (30%), followed by MM1-2 (20%), AND THAT The Majority of cases were male (60%), AND half of them had exposure to wild game.

snip...see more on Prion 2017 Macaque study from Prion 2017 Conference and other updated science on cwd tse prion zoonosis below...terry

https://prion2018.org/wp-content/upl...05/program.pdf

https://prion2018.org/

Prion 2017

Conference Abstracts CWD 2017 PRION CONFERENCE

First evidence of intracranial and peroral transmission of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) into Cynomolgus macaques: a work in progress

Stefanie Czub1, Walter Schulz-Schaeffer2, Christiane Stahl-Hennig3, Michael Beekes4, Hermann Schaetzl5 and Dirk Motzkus6 1

University of Calgary Faculty of Veterinary Medicine/Canadian Food Inspection Agency; 2Universitatsklinikum des Saarlandes und Medizinische Fakultat der Universitat des Saarlandes; 3 Deutsches Primaten Zentrum/Goettingen; 4 Robert-Koch-Institut Berlin; 5 University of Calgary Faculty of Veterinary Medicine; 6 presently: Boehringer Ingelheim Veterinary Research Center; previously: Deutsches Primaten Zentrum/Goettingen

This is a progress report of a project which started in 2009. 21 cynomolgus macaques were challenged with characterized CWD material from white-tailed deer (WTD) or elk by intracerebral (ic), oral, and skin exposure routes. Additional blood transfusion experiments are supposed to assess the CWD contamination risk of human blood product. Challenge materials originated from symptomatic cervids for ic, skin scarification and partially per oral routes (WTD brain). Challenge material for feeding of muscle derived from preclinical WTD and from preclinical macaques for blood transfusion experiments. We have confirmed that the CWD challenge material contained at least two different CWD agents (brain material) as well as CWD prions in muscle-associated nerves. Here we present first data on a group of animals either challenged ic with steel wires or per orally and sacrificed with incubation times ranging from 4.5 to 6.9 years at postmortem. Three animals displayed signs of mild clinical disease, including anxiety, apathy, ataxia and/or tremor. In four animals wasting was observed, two of those had confirmed diabetes. All animals have variable signs of prion neuropathology in spinal cords and brains and by supersensitive IHC, reaction was detected in spinal cord segments of all animals. Protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA), real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuiC) and PET-blot assays to further substantiate these findings are on the way, as well as bioassays in bank voles and transgenic mice. At present, a total of 10 animals are sacrificed and read-outs are ongoing. Preclinical incubation of the remaining macaques covers a range from 6.4 to 7.10 years. Based on the species barrier and an incubation time of > 5 years for BSE in macaques and about 10 years for scrapie in macaques, we expected an onset of clinical disease beyond 6 years post inoculation.

PRION 2017

DECIPHERING NEURODEGENERATIVE DISORDERS

Subject: PRION 2017 CONFERENCE DECIPHERING NEURODEGENERATIVE DISORDERS VIDEO

PRION 2017

CONFERENCE DECIPHERING NEURODEGENERATIVE DISORDERS

*** PRION 2017 CONFERENCE VIDEO

https://www.youtube.com/embed/Vtt1kAVDhDQ http://prion2017.org/programme/

https://www.cste2.org/Webinars/files...ides_FINAL.pdf


just out CDC...see;

Research

Susceptibility of Human Prion Protein to Conversion by Chronic Wasting Disease Prions

Marcelo A. BarriaComments to Author , Adriana Libori, Gordon Mitchell, and Mark W. Head Author affiliations: National CJD Research and Surveillance Unit, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK (M.A. Barria, A. Libori, M.W. Head); National and OIE Reference Laboratory for Scrapie and CWD, Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (G. Mitchell)

M. A. Barria et al.

ABSTRACT

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a contagious and fatal neurodegenerative disease and a serious animal health issue for deer and elk in North America. The identification of the first cases of CWD among free-ranging reindeer and moose in Europe brings back into focus the unresolved issue of whether CWD can be zoonotic like bovine spongiform encephalopathy. We used a cell-free seeded protein misfolding assay to determine whether CWD prions from elk, white-tailed deer, and reindeer in North America can convert the human prion protein to the disease-associated form. We found that prions can convert, but the efficiency of conversion is affected by polymorphic variation in the cervid and human prion protein genes. In view of the similarity of reindeer, elk, and white-tailed deer in North America to reindeer, red deer, and roe deer, respectively, in Europe, a more comprehensive and thorough assessment of the zoonotic potential of CWD might be warranted.

https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/24/8/16-1888_article

Molecular Barriers to Zoonotic Transmission of Prions

Marcelo A. Barria, Aru Balachandran, Masanori Morita, Tetsuyuki Kitamoto, Rona Barron, Jean Manson, Richard Knight, James W. Ironside, and Mark W. Headcorresponding author

snip...

The conversion of human PrPC by CWD brain homogenate in PMCA reactions was less efficient when the amino acid at position 129 was valine rather than methionine.

***Furthermore, the form of human PrPres produced in this in vitro assay when seeded with CWD, resembles that found in the most common human prion disease, namely sCJD of the MM1 subtype.

snip...

However, we can say with confidence that under the conditions used here, none of the animal isolates tested were as efficient as C-type BSE in converting human PrPC, which is reassuring.

***Less reassuring is the finding that there is no absolute barrier to the conversion of human PrPC by CWD prions in a protocol using a single round of PMCA and an entirely human substrate prepared from the target organ of prion diseases, the brain.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3884726/


kind regards, terry
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Old 11-14-2018, 10:16 AM   #11
flounder9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle1974 View Post
It’s been in the wild
Deer population for years. The only reason they find CWD cases in breeding ranches is because they’re testing almost 100 of the deer that die. The first CWD positive come
From a mule deer in West Texas. This isn’t a deer breeding problem it’s just easier to find in breeding facilities.

Ask the king ranch if they’re willing to pull brain stems from 100% of the deer that die or are killed in their ranch. They won’t because deep down, the last thing they want is a positive test coming off their place. So instead they’re going to sit on a board of experts and wave a flag saying they’re only trying to protect texas’ deer.... so again, why aren’t they testing?


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in Minnesota and other states, that 100% cwd testing in captive (LOL), reminds me also of the SSS policy. this SSS policy worked very well for Klein et al in Canada with BSE TSE Prion.


''Alberta Premier Ralph Klein has taken aim at the owner of the province's infamous mad cow, saying a "self-respecting" rancher would not have taken the animal to slaughter but instead would have simply "shot, shovelled and shut up."


...see;


Deer and elk producers are required by law to submit specific tissues for CWD testing for all deer and elk that die at age 12 months or older.3

***>BAH staff do not currently analyze CWD-testing compliance, unless they have a specific reason to manually evaluate the records associated with a particular herd.

***>We analyzed BAH data and found that an estimated one-third of deer and elk producers failed to submit tissue samples for CWD testing from 2014 to 2017.

***>Another issue with respect to CWD sample submission is sample quality. If producers submit the wrong type of tissue or a sample that is otherwise unreadable, the deer or elk in question will not be tested for CWD.

***>From 2014 to 2017, the percentage of unreadable samples increased from 2 percent to 11 percent. In 2017, BAH began retraining producers who had submitted poor-quality samples. As a result, sample quality began to improve during the latter half of 2017. We recommend that BAH develop a standardized training and approval program for deer and elk producers who wish to collect their own CWD test samples.

***>It was recently reported that a Winona County cervid farm that tested positive for CWD also had fences in poor repair.4

***> Despite the fact that the fences (by the owner’s own admission) had been sagging for years, BAH had never mentioned fence issues on the farm’s annual inspection reports.

We do not know the degree to which this type of apparent enforcement error has occurred, and this lapse in oversight is concerning. However, the new director of the deer and elk program has made numerous changes over the past several months that will hopefully improve BAH’s enforcement of deer and elk regulations going forward.

Recent BAH changes include improved communication, through the development of a cervid-farming handbook and a CWD-testing guide. The new director has also placed a renewed emphasis on enforcement, putting in place the expectation that the field staff inspecting cervid farms give warnings and reinspect farms when they note violations. We recommend that the board fully enforce Minnesota cervid laws and that they consider strengthening the penalties for producers who fail to comply. Further, the board should monitor the performance of field staff conducting inspections.

***>The strained relationship between BAH and DNR has led to problems with data sharing.

BAH responds when CWD is detected on deer or elk farms; DNR leads the

4

Tony Kennedy, “‘Hunters should be…afraid,’” Star Tribune, March 7, 2018.

response when the disease is found in the wild. Both agencies, however, take certain actions when CWD is detected in the other agency’s jurisdiction, which means that the two must coordinate to a certain extent.

In order to respond to CWD outbreaks, each agency, at a minimum, must know the precise location where the infected animal was found. The tension between the two agencies, however, has resulted in poor communication and complaints from both sides with respect to sharing information.

***>DNR staff have complained that BAH refuses to share information about infected farms in a timely fashion. BAH staff allege that DNR has not adequately protected producer contact information, which is classified by law as not public data.5

We recommend that the two agencies draft a memorandum of understanding making clear what information should be shared between agencies in the event of CWD outbreak, in what timeframe, and the measures the receiving agency should take to protect the data. BAH and DNR finalized an agreement on April 10, 2018, which focuses on protecting not public data. We think this is a good first step. There are some states with policies for managing farmed deer and elk that may better protect their animals from CWD.

Exhibit 3.2: Since 2002, Minnesota has had eleven chronic wasting disease events.

see chart below;

snip...see full text 76 pages;

https://www.auditor.leg.state.mn.us/.../deerfarms.pdf

captive game farms and 100% testing...LOL!

Iowa CWD

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogs...aw-allows.html

http://www.iowadnr.gov/Portals/idnr/...4may28_nrc.pdf

THURSDAY, MAY 17, 2018

Texas TAHC CWD TSE Prion Pay to Play Federal Indemnity Program, or what i call, ENTITLEMENT PROGRAM for Game Farm Industry

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogs...y-to-play.html

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 03, 2018

Texas Reports 13 more cases of Chronic Wasting Disease CWD TSE Prion in Breeder Deer state total jumps to 130 Confirmed to date

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogs...f-chronic.html

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

TPWD CWD Sample Collector Trainings in the Trans Pecos and Panhandle

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogs...inings-in.html

Wednesday, July 22, 2015

Texas Certified Chronic Wasting Disease CWD Sample Collector, like the Wolf Guarding the Henhouse

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogs...g-disease.html

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2018

Pennsylvania Thirty-Eight Deer Test Positive for Chronic Wasting Disease on Fulton and Bedford County Deer Farms

https://chronic-wasting-disease.blog...deer-test.html

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 03, 2018

WISCONSIN CAVES TO GAME FARM INDUSTRY AGAIN WHILE STATE FALLS FURTHER INTO THE ABYSS OF MAD DEER DISEASE CWD TSE PRION

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogs...-industry.html

Sunday, January 06, 2013

USDA TO PGC ONCE CAPTIVES ESCAPE

*** "it‘s no longer its business.”

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogs...pe-its-no.html

COLORADO THE ORIGIN OF CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD TSE PRION?

*** Spraker suggested an interesting explanation for the occurrence of CWD. The deer pens at the Foot Hills Campus were built some 30-40 years ago by a Dr. Bob Davis. At or abut that time, allegedly, some scrapie work was conducted at this site. When deer were introduced to the pens they occupied ground that had previously been occupied by sheep.

IN CONFIDENCE, REPORT OF AN UNCONVENTIONAL SLOW VIRUS DISEASE IN ANIMALS IN THE USA 1989

http://webarchive.nationalarchives.g...m11b/tab01.pdf

ALSO, one of the most, if not the most top TSE Prion God in Science today is Professor Adriano Aguzzi, and he recently commented on just this, on a cwd post on my facebook page August 20 at 1:44pm, quote;

''it pains me to no end to even comtemplate the possibility, but it seems entirely plausible that CWD originated from scientist-made spread of scrapie from sheep to deer in the colorado research facility. If true, a terrible burden for those involved.'' August 20 at 1:44pm ...end

”The occurrence of CWD must be viewed against the contest of the locations in which it occurred. It was an incidental and unwelcome complication of the respective wildlife research programmes. Despite it’s subsequent recognition as a new disease of cervids, therefore justifying direct investigation, no specific research funding was forthcoming. The USDA veiwed it as a wildlife problem and consequently not their province!” page 26.

https://web.archive.org/web/20060307...m11b/tab01.pdf

SHOOTING PENS (HIGH/LOW FENCE), CAPTIVE CERVID FARMING, BREEDING, SPERM MILLS, ANTLER MILLS, URINE MILLS, a petri dish for cwd tse prion disease...

*** Spraker suggested an interesting explanation for the occurrence of CWD. The deer pens at the Foot Hills Campus were built some 30-40 years ago by a Dr. Bob Davis. At or abut that time, allegedly, some scrapie work was conducted at this site. When deer were introduced to the pens they occupied ground that had previously been occupied by sheep.

https://web.archive.org/web/20170126...m11b/tab01.pdf

COLORADO THE ORIGIN OF CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD TSE PRION?

*** Spraker suggested an interesting explanation for the occurrence of CWD. The deer pens at the Foot Hills Campus were built some 30-40 years ago by a Dr. Bob Davis. At or abut that time, allegedly, some scrapie work was conducted at this site. When deer were introduced to the pens they occupied ground that had previously been occupied by sheep.

IN CONFIDENCE, REPORT OF AN UNCONVENTIONAL SLOW VIRUS DISEASE IN ANIMALS IN THE USA 1989

http://webarchive.nationalarchives.g...m11b/tab01.pdf



kind regards, terry
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Old 11-14-2018, 10:36 AM   #12
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Flounder aka Terry,

Your grammar or lack thereof make it near impossible to read and gather and useful information. Please decode the sentence below.

in Minnesota and other states, that 100% cwd testing in captive (LOL), reminds me also of the SSS policy. this SSS policy worked very well for Klein et al in Canada with BSE TSE Prion.
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Old 11-14-2018, 10:41 AM   #13
Txhuntr2
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Dang Flounder, I thought I got away from these posts when I joined this forum.
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Old 11-14-2018, 10:54 AM   #14
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I know when I owned property and hunted Hilltop, for two-three years before I sold it they partnered with TPWD and tested every deer that was harvested the first month of the season. It is definitely nothing to mess with!



Michael
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Old 11-14-2018, 11:42 AM   #15
flounder9
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Originally Posted by Take Dead Aim View Post
Flounder aka Terry,

Your grammar or lack thereof make it near impossible to read and gather and useful information. Please decode the sentence below.

in Minnesota and other states, that 100% cwd testing in captive (LOL), reminds me also of the SSS policy. this SSS policy worked very well for Klein et al in Canada with BSE TSE Prion.

you understand perfectly well what was written, my grammar reads just fine. the science speaks for itself, i am not sparring with you. if you don't like what is written, and or can't understand it, move on, nobody is forcing you to read this thread. with that said, i am pretty much done with this update anyway...

good luck!

terry
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Old 11-14-2018, 12:37 PM   #16
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you understand perfectly well what was written, my grammar reads just fine. the science speaks for itself, i am not sparring with you. if you don't like what is written, and or can't understand it, move on, nobody is forcing you to read this thread. with that said, i am pretty much done with this update anyway...

good luck!

terry
LMAO! You're wanting to spread awareness of CWD scientific evidence, but if we don't understand it just move on. I'm not a CWD denier, and appreciate you sharing the information, but come on man.
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Old 11-14-2018, 12:41 PM   #17
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LMAO! You're wanting to spread awareness of CWD scientific evidence, but if we don't understand it just move on. I'm not a CWD denier, and appreciate you sharing the information, but come on man.
Agreed, I like science but it doesn't mean I speak it well.
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Old 11-14-2018, 12:45 PM   #18
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and it doesn't help when idiots like Keith Warren are out their screaming it is all fake because he's getting paid by every deer breeder association in the country.
Keith Warren is nothing but a shill for whoever is throwing money his way.
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Old 11-14-2018, 01:59 PM   #19
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Keith Warren is nothing but a shill for whoever is throwing money his way.
indeed.
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Old 01-05-2019, 12:27 PM   #20
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FRIDAY, JANUARY 04, 2019

TEXAS TPWD CONFIRMED CWD TSE PRION 3 WTD in Medina, Dallam, and Hartley Counties, and in 3 MD in Hudspeth, Hartley, and El Paso Counties

https://chronic-wasting-disease.blog...e-prion-3.html
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Old 01-06-2019, 03:57 PM   #21
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FRIDAY, JANUARY 04, 2019

TEXAS TPWD CONFIRMED CWD TSE PRION 3 WTD in Medina, Dallam, and Hartley Counties, and in 3 MD in Hudspeth, Hartley, and El Paso Counties

https://chronic-wasting-disease.blog...e-prion-3.html
Still walking across the border I see.
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Old 01-12-2019, 01:30 PM   #22
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***> This is very likely to have parallels with control efforts for CWD in cervids.

Rapid recontamination of a farm building occurs after attempted prion removal

http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/vr.105054

Kevin Christopher Gough, BSc (Hons), PhD1, Claire Alison Baker, BSc (Hons)2, Steve Hawkins, MIBiol3, Hugh Simmons, BVSc, MRCVS, MBA, MA3, Timm Konold, DrMedVet, PhD, MRCVS3 and Ben Charles Maddison, BSc (Hons), PhD2

Author affiliations

School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, The University of Nottingham, Loughborough, UK ADAS, School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, The University of Nottingham, Loughborough, UK Animal Sciences Unit, Pathology Department, Animal & Plant Health Agency Weybridge, New Haw, Addlestone, Surrey, UK E-mail for correspondence; ben.maddison@adas.co.uk

Abstract

The transmissible spongiform encephalopathy scrapie of sheep/goats and chronic wasting disease of cervids are associated with environmental reservoirs of infectivity.

Preventing environmental prions acting as a source of infectivity to healthy animals is of major concern to farms that have had outbreaks of scrapie and also to the health management of wild and farmed cervids.

Here, an efficient scrapie decontamination protocol was applied to a farm with high levels of environmental contamination with the scrapie agent.

Post-decontamination, no prion material was detected within samples taken from the farm buildings as determined using a sensitive in vitro replication assay (sPMCA).

A bioassay consisting of 25 newborn lambs of highly susceptible prion protein genotype VRQ/VRQ introduced into this decontaminated barn was carried out in addition to sampling and analysis of dust samples that were collected during the bioassay.

Twenty-four of the animals examined by immunohistochemical analysis of lymphatic tissues were scrapie-positive during the bioassay, samples of dust collected within the barn were positive by month 3.

The data illustrates the difficulty in decontaminating farm buildings from scrapie, and demonstrates the likely contribution of farm dust to the recontamination of these environments to levels that are capable of causing disease.

snip...

PrPC is ubiquitous in its distribution in vivo2 and with both scrapie and CWD the in vivo dissemination of infectivity is also widespread with PrPSc usually accumulating within peripheral lymphatic tissues before the CNS.3 4 With scrapie, PrPSc can be secreted/ excreted via a multiplicity of routes including saliva,5 6 milk,7 faeces,8 skin9 and urine.10 The accumulation of this material within the environment (particularly the built farm environment),11 12 creates levels of infectivity that can be transmitted to naïve animals. These reservoirs of infectivity can remain infectious for prolonged periods of time, in one such recorded incident at least 16 years.13 The advent of high sensitivity prion replication assays such as protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) with application to sheep/goat scrapie14 15 has allowed the monitoring of prions within environments.11

Attempts to decontaminate pens on a scrapie-affected farm and measuring efficacy using a sheep bioassay were previously reported.12 It was concluded that the failure of effective decontamination within that study was likely to have been due to the incomplete farm decontamination and the presence of dust containing infectious prions that recontaminated the pen surfaces. The serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification (sPMCA) technique was recently used to confirm the presence of prions within extracts prepared from dust samples that had settled on sterile surfaces.16 Given the presence of mobile infectious prions within dust, it was proposed that for effective scrapie decontamination emphasis should be given to the removal of all sources of dust within the decontamination strategy for a farm. More recently, the sPMCA technique has been used by the authors' laboratory to look at effective methods of decontaminating prions bound to concrete surfaces within the laboratory setting.17 This study demonstrated that current methodology based on a one-hour exposure to 20000 ppm free chlorine was likely to be ineffective at removing surface-bound scrapie prion. However, there was an enhanced effectiveness of this chemical decontamination when using multiple applications over four hours. Here, a study is described where a scrapie-affected farm was decontaminated using four applications of 20000 ppm free chlorine to livestock barns and concreted areas. The decontamination also included a high-level clean of the buildings that had housed sheep to remove all traces of dust as far as practicable before the chemical decontamination procedure. Following these treatments the surfaces within the barn were demonstrably free from prion using a sensitive sPMCA assay. The presence of any residual infectivity was then evaluated by sheep bioassay and dust samples collected during the bioassay were assayed for prion seeding activity by sPMCA.

snip...

Discussion

The authors' previous work on this farm indicated that dust harbours low levels of mobile scrapie prions that can accumulate on surfaces16 and this is likely to perpetuate transmission of scrapie within such a farm environment.12 In addition, previous in vitro modelling of scrapie prions bound to a concrete ‘fomite’ demonstrated that prion seeding activity could be inactivated by four applications of 20,000 ppm free chlorine as measured by a sPMCA assay. This previous modelling demonstrated that residual contamination of the swab extract with hypochlorite at levels which would inhibit the sPMCA are unlikely, and the authors consider these results as reduction in seeding titre.17 Here, this same decontamination methodology was tested within a farm-scale study which also included steps to remove dust within the barns. This study demonstrated that this thorough decontamination method applied to a farm with a high incidence of naturally acquired scrapie was sufficient to remove scrapie prions on surfaces to levels that were undetectable by sPMCA, one of the most sensitive biochemical assays for prions. The authors' sPMCA assay has an limit of detection of around 1–10pg scrapie-infected sheep brain per sPMCA reaction. The authors assume that the samples negative by sPMCA had less than this amount (of brain equivalent) within the extracts that were prepared. This treatment together with measures designed to minimise the amount of dust retained within the buildings (vacuuming all surfaces, pressure washing and then hypochlorite treatment) was expected to have removed all infectivity from the buildings and the concrete areas surrounding them, and it was anticipated that the sheep bioassay would confirm absence of infective prion.

However, the introduction into this decontaminated barn of 25 VRQ/VRQ sheep (a genotype highly susceptible to classical scrapie) demonstrated that all animals, with the exception of 1 lamb that died at 122 dpe, had detectable PrPSc in lymphoid tissue, indicating infection with the scrapie agent. This included 14 animals (54 per cent) that were PrPSc-positive on the first RAMALT analysis at 372 dpe or 419 dpe. Although infected sheep were removed based on a positive RAMALT result, it is possible that lateral transmission or subsequent contamination of the environment from infected sheep had contributed to the rapid spread of scrapie in nearly all sheep. It has been shown previously that objects in contact with scrapie-infected sheep, such as water troughs and fence posts, can act as a reservoir for infection.23 As in the authors' previous study,12 the decontamination of this sheep barn was not effective at removing scrapie infectivity, and despite the extra measures brought into this study (more effective chemical treatment and removal of sources of dust) the overall rates of disease transmission mirror previous results on this farm. With such apparently effective decontamination (assuming that at least some sPMCA seeding ability is coincident with infectivity), how was infectivity able to persist within the environment and where does infectivity reside? Dust samples were collected in both the bioassay barn and also a barn subject to the same decontamination regime within the same farm (but remaining unoccupied). Within both of these barns dust had accumulated for three months that was able to seed sPMCA, indicating the accumulation of scrapie-containing material that was independent of the presence of sheep that may have been incubating and possibly shedding low amounts of infectivity.

This study clearly demonstrates the difficulty in removing scrapie infectivity from the farm environment. Practical and effective prion decontamination methods are still urgently required for decontamination of scrapie infectivity from farms that have had cases of scrapie and this is particularly relevant for scrapiepositive goatherds, which currently have limited genetic resistance to scrapie within commercial breeds.24 This is very likely to have parallels with control efforts for CWD in cervids.

Acknowledgements The authors thank the APHA farm staff, Tony Duarte, Olly Roberts and Margaret Newlands for preparation of the sheep pens and animal husbandry during the study. The authors also thank the APHA pathology team for RAMALT and postmortem examination.

Funding This study was funded by DEFRA within project SE1865.

Competing interests None declared.

https://veterinaryrecord.bmj.com/con...vr.105054.long

Saturday, January 5, 2019

Rapid recontamination of a farm building occurs after attempted prion removal

https://prionprp.blogspot.com/2019/0...-building.html

FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, 2019

TEXAS TAHC Legislative Appropriations Request For Fiscal Years 2018 and 2019 CWD TSE PRION PAY TO PLAY PROGRAM

https://chronic-wasting-disease.blog...priations.html
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Old 01-12-2019, 01:46 PM   #23
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Look at the bright side!....The price of leases is going to drop when nobody will want to eat those CWD contaminated deer.
You have plenty of copy and paste articles by flounder, but ask him to post the fatalities that are mounting with humans dying from it! Chances are he can't!
It's nothing new, or something that just popped up out of nowhere!
I can't prove that it's not a concern to a degree, but I wouldn't put it past the PETA types to take this approach as a way to stop hunting via a fear agenda, and one that even the TPWD upper management has bought in to.

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Old 01-12-2019, 03:18 PM   #24
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Researchers seem to be making some progress.

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/...ess-infectious
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Old 01-12-2019, 03:38 PM   #25
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Researchers seem to be making some progress.

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/...ess-infectious


Good read labman!

Never knew that CWD was in Norway and South Korea! Must be those deer breeders from Texas fault.


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Old 01-12-2019, 03:56 PM   #26
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What about the transfer to pigs, cows, etc......
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Old 01-12-2019, 04:46 PM   #27
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and it doesn't help when idiots like Keith Warren are out their screaming it is all fake because he's getting paid by every deer breeder association in the country.
That guy definitely is on the take.
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