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Old 03-18-2021, 06:14 PM   #1
miket
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Default Employers: Hiring tricks and tips

Looking for tips when hiring employees. I have done it as an employee and now as employer. To put it bluntly, I'm not good at it.

People lie about everything, overstate skills and experience etc.

How do you see through it? There seem to be so few good candidates, how to weed out the bad ones ( the majority )
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Old 03-18-2021, 06:21 PM   #2
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It's been a few years but I always watched their mannerisms when asked tough questions.
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Old 03-18-2021, 06:25 PM   #3
Artos
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References from previous employers...pay attn to their replies.

Recommendation letters....confirmed.
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Old 03-18-2021, 06:25 PM   #4
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Sometimes you just have to wing it........
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Old 03-18-2021, 06:33 PM   #5
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Pay them by the day no strings attached till you can see what their capabilities are. If they need a job and want to work they should be up to the challenge. Kind of a trial/probation period.
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Old 03-18-2021, 06:34 PM   #6
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Give me an example of what position you're hiring for.Hiring a routine production guy/mechanic/hydraulic guy..They all get different questions..It's not fool proof,but you can weed them out pretty quick..Have you ever worked shift work?It's a requirement.You'll be on call,it's a requirement..Whether it is,or isn't..Let's you know real quick,whether they're hungry or not..What's the most awful job you've ever had?
Landscaper,iron workers helper,plumbers helper..Would you rather build a race car,or drive it?
I've got a million of em..Makes em open up,and kinda show you a personal side..Again,it's not 100%,but I've got a pretty good average.
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Old 03-18-2021, 06:35 PM   #7
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During their interview, purposely drop a pen. If they jump up and hand it back to you hire them... if they just stare at it or wait for you to pick it up move them along...
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Old 03-18-2021, 06:44 PM   #8
miket
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This is a skilled trade. Blue collar. Hourly. Non supervisory.
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Old 03-18-2021, 06:59 PM   #9
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You might need to restructure your pay system.
Your business isn't the same as mine was but I tried the hourly route and that didn't work out so well for me, especially being unsupervised. Come by to see how things are going, and find employees sitting around or one time fishing in my pond! I started paying for the production they were doing and that helped everyone tremendously. The more they worked, the more they made. Me also. Everybody wins.
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Old 03-18-2021, 07:04 PM   #10
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When I ran A welding shop, I would give a simple welding test. I would tell the applicants to fit it, and not to weld it until I saw it. I would purposely take off to the other shop for about 10 or 15 minutes. The test was so easy, guys just couldn't wait to weld it up. I'd get back and 90% of them would be standing there with the test all welded. I'd say "FAILED" as I walked up, and they would laugh until they saw I was serious.

The instruction to the test were to fit it and NOT to weld it until I saw it. I can teach a guy how to weld, but if they can't follow simple instructions then it's a no from me.
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Old 03-18-2021, 07:05 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miket View Post
Looking for tips when hiring employees. I have done it as an employee and now as employer. To put it bluntly, I'm not good at it.

People lie about everything, overstate skills and experience etc.

How do you see through it? There seem to be so few good candidates, how to weed out the bad ones ( the majority )
One thing is, when they come inside the office, stall them and go inspect their vehicle. If they donít have a clean vehicle that is taken care of, they wonít care for your stuff either. It has nothing to do with how old or expensive, mainly with how well itís kept. Trash everywhere inside and dirty isnít a good sign. It doesnít cost much to clean. Its more about taking pride in your belongings.
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Old 03-18-2021, 07:12 PM   #12
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When I was in a position to hire people I figured I was successful in about one of three.
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Old 03-18-2021, 07:15 PM   #13
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Have someone else you trust sit in and/or participate in the interviews. Really ďreadingĒ a person while your in the process of having a conversation/interviewing/selling a person is a skill. It amazing what you can pick up on with people when youíre watching two people converse while being somewhat of an observer at different parts of the process.


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Old 03-18-2021, 07:15 PM   #14
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Use a temp/staffing service, get them to somewhat pre screen them and if you don’t like the or they don’t like you they just walk away. It’s not fool proof and you might run through a few but you may get really lucky as well and find a good hand.
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Old 03-18-2021, 08:28 PM   #15
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I’m not a jock, but I’ve found the guys I’ve hired that played sports were harder working, easier to train, and didn’t get their feelings hurt easily compared to those that didn’t.

I came to this realization when I had a couple lacrosse players staining boards out in the sun on a 100 degree day. I couldn’t get them to come inside and take a water break. I asked them if it was any hotter than being in a lacrosse helmet and they said “nope.” They were just happy to be making money.
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Old 03-18-2021, 08:31 PM   #16
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Aptitude test.
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Old 03-18-2021, 08:43 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miket View Post
This is a skilled trade. Blue collar. Hourly. Non supervisory.


For this type of position, my main concern would be why they are looking for a new job. Previous employer probably not going to let go of a good one easy.

Also can ask about their long term career goals, and how they plan to achieve them.

If you want to go the extra mile, ask for professional AND personal references. Professional may be limited on what they can tell you/answer. The type of personal reference someone puts down can tell you a lot about them.
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Old 03-18-2021, 08:44 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Artos View Post
References from previous employers...pay attn to their replies.

Recommendation letters....confirmed.
I rarely if ever check references. Have you ever listed someone as a reference that's going to say you're a bad employee and poor performer?

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Old 03-18-2021, 08:48 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by JBJTX81 View Post
I rarely if ever check references. Have you ever listed someone as a reference that's going to say you're a bad employee and poor performer?

Sent from my SM-G981U using Tapatalk


Youíd be surprised how many people donít have three good references. Itís pretty easy to see through the BS if you spend 10 minutes talking to someone and ask for examples when they say ďJimbo is one of the hardest working guys I know.Ē Never call the first person on the list, though.
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Old 03-18-2021, 08:51 PM   #20
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It's a crap shoot man. I've hired hundreds if not thousands of employees over the years. Some of the best folks at interview lasted 60-90 days. Some of the more skeptical candidates turned out amazing.

Agree with post above. Most folks that played sports or were military fared better.

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Old 03-18-2021, 08:54 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by J-5 View Post
One thing is, when they come inside the office, stall them and go inspect their vehicle. If they donít have a clean vehicle that is taken care of, they wonít care for your stuff either. It has nothing to do with how old or expensive, mainly with how well itís kept. Trash everywhere inside and dirty isnít a good sign. It doesnít cost much to clean. Its more about taking pride in your belongings.
My opinion this is not the case. Some people treat vehicles as a tool some people are **** about keeping them clean. I dont think it's any reflection on the type of employee they will be.
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Old 03-18-2021, 08:55 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gatorgrizz27 View Post
Iím not a jock, but Iíve found the guys Iíve hired that played sports were harder working, easier to train, and didnít get their feelings hurt easily compared to those that didnít.

I came to this realization when I had a couple lacrosse players staining boards out in the sun on a 100 degree day. I couldnít get them to come inside and take a water break. I asked them if it was any hotter than being in a lacrosse helmet and they said ďnope.Ē They were just happy to be making money.

This.
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Old 03-18-2021, 09:06 PM   #23
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Maybe its my biases? If someone has 20+yrs and show the slightest signs of burnout, I shut down. ( experience is required but long term experience often leads to attitude and lack of drive ) Or too few years, for obvious reasons...if they seem motivated and want to please, accommodating I like it. ( but fakers and liars know to play this game )

Finding someone with skill and without deep personal issues, that actually wants to work.......needle in a haystack
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Old 03-18-2021, 09:11 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by panhandlehunter View Post
Aptitude test.
It seems like aptitude or ability are only the first part of the issue. Some have the skills, but can't come to work on time, or every day. Or can't stay on task and hammer it out day after day etc
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Old 03-18-2021, 09:14 PM   #25
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Sales positions seem to be easier to hire for.......either the person has been a top performer or that have not. Not what you are dealing with but just saying.......I would look for recommendation letters from previous Mgmt members that include email and phone numbers. People who are willing to provide that information typically have nothing to hide. Also, is the person re-hirable at their last company they worked for.
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Old 03-18-2021, 09:18 PM   #26
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In your case you might be better off going to someone already doing the job well and recruit them.
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Old 03-18-2021, 09:21 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by miket View Post

Finding someone with skill and without deep personal issues, that actually wants to work.......needle in a haystack
The company I ran the welding shop for, I was employee #154. When I left that company after 18 years we were on employee #4000 and something. We went through a lot of haystacks.
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Old 03-18-2021, 09:25 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by J-5 View Post
One thing is, when they come inside the office, stall them and go inspect their vehicle. If they donít have a clean vehicle that is taken care of, they wonít care for your stuff either. It has nothing to do with how old or expensive, mainly with how well itís kept. Trash everywhere inside and dirty isnít a good sign. It doesnít cost much to clean. Its more about taking pride in your belongings.
Had a customer that would do this. Secretary would let him know when they had arrived and he'd go inspect the vehicle.
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Old 03-18-2021, 09:29 PM   #29
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I found where we were missing things was placing too much value on experience and or skills. Those are important aspects but not nearly as important as the cultural/behavioral fit.

If someone had the cultural likeness that you desire you can easily teach them the craft. Doesn’t matter how great someone is or how much experience they have if they end up being a problem or cancer.

Line out some good culture type questions and place say a value percentage on it. Do the same on experience and skills. It will show you the talent you want to hire. If you are interested there are some really basic culture type question to ask that can lead down several different paths. This will expose their mindset and beliefs.
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Old 03-18-2021, 09:41 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roscoe View Post
Have someone else you trust sit in and/or participate in the interviews. Really ďreadingĒ a person while your in the process of having a conversation/interviewing/selling a person is a skill. It amazing what you can pick up on with people when youíre watching two people converse while being somewhat of an observer at different parts of the process.


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This is exactly what I do when I'm conducting interviews. I'll have another employee interview with me. I'll lead with a few basic questions and then let my co-worker ask most of the rest.... Then I sit and observe and chime in whenever I see fit or want to ask a question. I get to spend a lot of the interview reading into the person.
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Old 03-18-2021, 09:50 PM   #31
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A quality guy with experience knows what heís worth. You canít buy gold for the price of bronze. If Iím your ideal candidate what about your company is going to interest me enough to consider working for you?
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Old 03-18-2021, 09:56 PM   #32
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Quote:
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I found where we were missing things was placing too much value on experience and or skills. Those are important aspects but not nearly as important as the cultural/behavioral fit.

If someone had the cultural likeness that you desire you can easily teach them the craft. Doesnít matter how great someone is or how much experience they have if they end up being a problem or cancer.

Line out some good culture type questions and place say a value percentage on it. Do the same on experience and skills. It will show you the talent you want to hire. If you are interested there are some really basic culture type question to ask that can lead down several different paths. This will expose their mindset and beliefs.
this is good right here.
One easy question to get the culture is simple...what is your favorite movie?
them ask them why?
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Old 03-18-2021, 10:02 PM   #33
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Hire a Veteran.
Shows to work on time.
Does what is told.
Works well in a team.

List job requirements not a wishlist.
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Old 03-18-2021, 10:15 PM   #34
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I feel like a pretty good judge of character, and mostly go by my gut feeling on that. One thing I will not tolerate is someone who agrees with everything I say, and says they can/will do anything we need done.

I prefer someone who isnít afraid to tell me they donít know how to do something, but can tell me about something else they couldnít do, but learned how. I really like someone with questions for me about things other than pay.

There are no sure things, or absolutes. Iím prone to taking fliers over ďsure thingsĒ. Iíve just had better luck that way.

There are no sure things, I KNOW that.


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Old 03-18-2021, 10:43 PM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miket View Post
This is a skilled trade. Blue collar. Hourly. Non supervisory.
I started hiring on character, values and what they want to achieve. Had few guys give me their plans on how they wanted to buy a house and plan for family. Key words that give hints into work ethic. Has worked well for me. The few we hired on skill alone were not top tier.


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Old 03-19-2021, 12:09 AM   #36
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Originally Posted by JBJTX81 View Post
I rarely if ever check references. Have you ever listed someone as a reference that's going to say you're a bad employee and poor performer?
I'm friends with my old bosses & proud to have have letter of recommendations on hand...it would be awkward to give a reference that would crawfish on a conversation of parting on bad terms to come back and bite you.

If your last employer cannot vouch for your value...who can??

The References I'm referring are not the weekend drinking buddy with no standing?? Research is required.
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Old 03-19-2021, 05:25 AM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TKC View Post
I found where we were missing things was placing too much value on experience and or skills. Those are important aspects but not nearly as important as the cultural/behavioral fit.

If someone had the cultural likeness that you desire you can easily teach them the craft. Doesnít matter how great someone is or how much experience they have if they end up being a problem or cancer.

Line out some good culture type questions and place say a value percentage on it. Do the same on experience and skills. It will show you the talent you want to hire. If you are interested there are some really basic culture type question to ask that can lead down several different paths. This will expose their mindset and beliefs.
I wish more thought like this. Iíve been in power plant operations for 14 years. Iíve been trying to get on with a company that is more into transmission and distribution. Most of these companies require a two year tech degree to get in. Iím never afraid to bet on myself, but they wonít give me a chance at an apprenticeship. Iím willing to take a huge paycut, but they donít give me the time of day. I recently applied for a helper position with the same company, making less than half of what Iím making now. Hoping it works out. I think many times too much weight is placed on a degree or experience. Iím hungrier than most any guy youíll find especially the ones coming straight out of school. Iíd look more for a guy with a good and honest personality and not be afraid to offer less money but willing to train him. Let him know as he progresses youíll offer incentives as he learns the trade and skills needed.
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Old 03-19-2021, 05:47 AM   #38
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Hand them a laptop where the only icon is the trash can. "Here is a laptop. Show me how to _(Insert skill they claim to have)_. You have 15 minutes. Go."

If they can't find the program, they can't do the task. Our work is mostly computer based, so basic skills on a computer are a must.

We have a lot of "Yeah I created this product using this software". So we make them do it in front of us, or if for some reason they can't I will make them walk me through in painful detail how to do what they claim to know how to do. I drive the other interviewers nuts, but results show we find the best new hires that way.
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Old 03-19-2021, 05:53 AM   #39
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Good machinists have good jobs. It's the turds that float around from shop to shop.
Gotta poach the good ones from other shops.
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Old 03-19-2021, 06:38 AM   #40
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I always describe the job, what we offer and watch reactions... then I start asking open ended questions, wait for an answer. Job history is a big one for us also, not so much what they did but how long they were there and why they left. Always ask if you can call the former supervisor, a lot of times how they respond to that can tell you a lot. You have to be careful what you ask, but you can get to the same answers by asking the correct way. Good luck.
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Old 03-19-2021, 07:09 AM   #41
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Call their last boss and ask, would you hire them back? HR won't answer many question because they are afraid and not sure what they can legally say. The person they reported to will usually open up if they were in fact a good employee.
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Old 03-19-2021, 07:12 AM   #42
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We've had quite a few new hires here in our shop Mike. A couple of things I've noticed are, the more they say they can do, the less they really can do. And the ones that are in their twenty's and have worked in 10 different shops already, there is a reason. And just because they've gone to trade school for machining don't mean squat. They still come in not knowing anything. We've hired a few good one's, but still have to train just about everybody including the ones with several years experience. It's tough.
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Old 03-19-2021, 07:30 AM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PlanoDano View Post
Hire a Veteran.
Shows to work on time.
Does what is told.
Works well in a team.

List job requirements not a wishlist.
sorry, that isn't the case all the time. We got one who won't hit a lick at a snake except brown-nosing everyone above them. Always asking, never giving.
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Old 03-19-2021, 07:37 AM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J-5 View Post
One thing is, when they come inside the office, stall them and go inspect their vehicle. If they don’t have a clean vehicle that is taken care of, they won’t care for your stuff either. It has nothing to do with how old or expensive, mainly with how well it’s kept. Trash everywhere inside and dirty isn’t a good sign. It doesn’t cost much to clean. Its more about taking pride in your belongings.
I wouldn't recommend this one bit. If I came in and you did this to me you would miss out on a great employee. I live on a ranch and my truck stays dirty with crap in it all the time. Of course mine isn't full of trash either. My truck is a tool, I don't drive it around to pick up women or impress people. I always find that a lot of people who keep their vehicles sparkly clean are the opposite of work. They are more of a dog and pony show.


One thing I did learn when hiring for trade type work is if they were from a small town they usually had a better work ethic. You gotta go with your gut feeling and don't feel like you gotta hire someone to just fill a position.
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Old 03-19-2021, 07:37 AM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miket View Post
This is a skilled trade. Blue collar. Hourly. Non supervisory.
Hand them what you consider an average print. Asked them to walk you thru it. Setup, tooling, etc. That should tell you a lot right there. Pay attention to their expression when they look at it. If it's just an operator position, hand them a part with a print with no dimensions and have them write in the dimensions. But that's only one part. A few of the best machinists I know are flaky as hell.

Last edited by Graysonhogs; 03-19-2021 at 07:44 AM.
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Old 03-19-2021, 07:42 AM   #46
miket
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Originally Posted by DirtyDave View Post
Good machinists have good jobs. It's the turds that float around from shop to shop.
Gotta poach the good ones from other shops.
With all the layoffs and shop closures I was thinking the market would be in my favor this time....but it seems this still holds true....
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Old 03-19-2021, 07:47 AM   #47
texan16
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Ask job specific questions. Check references and NOT just the ones they list. If they dont list their previous employer as a reference, that is a red flag so find a way to contact the previous employer and get the scoop on the applicant. The last question I always ask every applicant is "Why should I hire you" you can usually weed the bad ones out with this question.
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Old 03-19-2021, 07:47 AM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Graysonhogs View Post
Hand them what you consider an average print. Asked them to walk you thru it. Setup, tooling, etc. That should tell you a lot right there. Pay attention to their expression when they look at it. If it's just an operator position, hand them a part with a print with no dimensions and have them write in the dimensions.
I know it is different now days, but we started on manual mills or lathes and worked our way up to NC's. I was still in HS and skipped school one day to interview with TI. I walked in and got handed off to the shop foreman. We walked over to a Bridgeport mill and he picked up a print and said, "Can you make this part?" I said, "Yes sir.". He said, "Here's the stuff you need. Make me one.". I had to make a part on my interview!
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Old 03-19-2021, 08:02 AM   #49
dphillips62
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Look for country folks. People that grew up on a ranch or farm they were taught good work ethics and common sense at an early age
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Old 03-19-2021, 08:06 AM   #50
westtexducks
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There is some truly terrible advice on this thread and no way in hell I would work for some of you manipulative *******s setting up tests with no right answer in the mind of the interviewee.

If I was working in a machine shop I would run a skills test of some sort just to see how honest they were in assessing their skill sets but I wouldn't be afraid to pick up a young pup looking to learn either, then at least you can groom them into what you want them to be, maybe a pain and slow to start but then you have the ability to help that employee become what you want. Like mentioned above look for some one hungry and honest. Ask them questions what do you know about x y z, just because they answer honestly doesn't necessarily mean you should cull them for not having said x y z skill. Ask them why did they apply for your spot, what makes them want to get out of bed and go to work every morning. And you just have to be a decent judge of the person and be able to read if they are full of crap. I think my BS meter is pretty decent so have faired ok so far. I also hate a sob story, some of my best employees are going through hell at home, but they did not use the sob story to try and sucker me into hiring them, I found out about it later when getting to know them on the job. Most every employee I have seen hired that had some sob story true or not has been a problem. But the ones that had the ability to get over that and quit feeling sorry for themselves and own it and press on have made excellent workers.
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