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Old 10-29-2018, 03:39 PM   #1
RickBarbee
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Default Let's Discuss Anchor Point, and Fletching

My anchor is:

(1) Index (or whichever) finger in corner of mouth (actually on a tooth)

(2) Jaw settled into the cup made by my thumb & little finger (boy scout salute)

(3) Nose on the back end, high point of my upper hen fletch (I shoot cock fletch in)

That's a pretty good 3 point anchor, and hard to screw up.

That anchor also almost forces me into proper back tension, and even when I don't quite have it I know it, and get it accordingly.

It took me a while to get used to & like the nose on the fletch thing, but trial & error on orientation & placement of the fletching took care of that.

Shooting cock fletch in on a 3 fletch setup, makes that top hen fletch perfect for a nose anchor point. You might have to play with how far forward, or back you set the fletching to get it where you want it, but mine are exactly 1&5/8" from the throat of the nock to the back of the fletch.

I still can't make it work where I like it when shooting cock fletch out, or in any other position for that matter, so cock fletch in it is for me.

When I shoot split finger, and want a closer point on, I anchor with my middle finger in corner of my mouth, instead of my index finger.

That gets the arrow closer to my eye, and knocks about 20 yards off my point on. A simple rocking of the wrist allows me to go from top finger to even my bottom finger in the corner of my mouth, without changing anything else. I do the same thing shooting 3 under.

Side Note:

Cock fletch in is hands down the most forgiving of all fletching orientations, and gives you the best fletching clearance you can possibly get, other than a 2 o'clock 7 o'clock two fletch.

That's not just opinion either. I have tested every orientation possible, by using red lipstick on the rest/riser, and white fletching to see where & why contact takes place.

YMMV

Rick
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Old 10-29-2018, 04:13 PM   #2
jerp
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Interesting. I shoot 3 under, cock fletch out. When my middle finger touches the corner of my mouth, the cock fletch touches the tip of my nose. Using shield cut seems to make the touching the nose thing easier because it is squared off at the back.

Why do you suppose cock fletch in is more forgiving? That is somewhat counter intuitive. I will give it a try but that may put the top hen feather too high to touch the tip of my nose. (?)
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Old 10-29-2018, 04:28 PM   #3
Derek Taylor
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Ttt
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Old 10-29-2018, 04:47 PM   #4
RickBarbee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jerp View Post
Interesting. I shoot 3 under, cock fletch out. When my middle finger touches the corner of my mouth, the cock fletch touches the tip of my nose. Using shield cut seems to make the touching the nose thing easier because it is squared off at the back.

Why do you suppose cock fletch in is more forgiving? That is somewhat counter intuitive. I will give it a try but that may put the top hen feather too high to touch the tip of my nose. (?)
Different head position is why.
I could touch my nose to the the fletch on an outer cock feather, but to do so caused me to have more forward & down head position than I prefer.
I like my head up/straight as much as possible, and the upper/outer hen fletch with a cock fletch in orientations allows me to do that.

As far as the cock fletch in having better clearance is concerned. It's all due to how a properly tuned arrow flexes around the riser, and how when properly tuned the fletching end passes more to the outside.

The yellow arrows show the direction the fletching is moving at pass,
and by studying the different orientation you can see which one will clear the easiest/best, especially when shooting off the shelf.

Keep in mind, unless you are using nocks that initiate rotation as they exit the string, the arrows do not start rotation, until they are well away from the bow.

Hope that helps explain it a bit.

Rick
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Old 10-30-2018, 12:30 AM   #5
tradtiger
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So, are you saying that the single cock feather being placed in toward the riser means only it may contact riser as it passes by during a shot and that the lower hen feather will likely not even contact the shelf anyway due to flexing out while passing at the time of shot release?

The other fletch orientation would have the possibility of both hen fletchings contacting riser upon shot release?

Therefore, the difference is one- versus two-fletching contact with riser?

Thus, "cock fletching-in", reduces fletching-related interference by half, compared to "cock fletching-out".

That about right?
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Old 10-30-2018, 07:19 AM   #6
DRT
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I watched a video where the cock fletch never touched the bow when shot in.

Gary
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Old 10-30-2018, 07:43 AM   #7
RickBarbee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tradtiger View Post
So, are you saying that the single cock feather being placed in toward the riser means only it may contact riser as it passes by during a shot and that the lower hen feather will likely not even contact the shelf anyway due to flexing out while passing at the time of shot release?

The other fletch orientation would have the possibility of both hen fletchings contacting riser upon shot release?

Therefore, the difference is one- versus two-fletching contact with riser?

Thus, "cock fletching-in", reduces fletching-related interference by half, compared to "cock fletching-out".

That about right?
Well sort of. Just amplify that a bit.
If properly tuned, there will be zero contact.
When properly tuned, there should be enough flex to keep even the inside cock fletch from making contact.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DRT View Post
I watched a video where the cock fletch never touched the bow when shot in.

Gary
Yep.

Rick
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Old 10-31-2018, 06:16 PM   #8
The Monk
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Interesting concept im gonna try rotating the cock feather in,as I work at the 3 point as well...thx Rick........how far did it change your point on aim relative to the other way?
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Old 10-31-2018, 06:32 PM   #9
RickBarbee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Monk View Post
Interesting concept im gonna try rotating the cock feather in,as I work at the 3 point as well...thx Rick........how far did it change your point on aim relative to the other way?
The fletch orientation didn't change my point ons any.

The cock fletch in just made my shots much more forgiving to things like an errant release, etc.

That don't mean you'll always get away with doing certain thing wrong, but when there's no contact at all, it makes it much harder for those things to have a negative influence on the shot.

Plus, ( a biggy for me) it makes me able to shoot vanes of the shelf.

Rick
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Old 10-31-2018, 06:48 PM   #10
Grits
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Rick this is the way I was taught to shoot my arrows when I got into traditional archery. Mr. Jim Ploen who was the original owner and bowyer at 21st Century Archery was the one that taught me that method. He basically explained it the same way you do, that there is less feather contact shooting that way.
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Old 10-31-2018, 09:54 PM   #11
Trumpkin
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I can't really speak to the fletching clearance. I've always liked cock feather up, personally. I may try it facing in once off season rolls around now that you recommend it though!

My anchors are as follows:
1. Nock under/along cheek bone, string contacts top of cheekbone
2. string pressed against eyebrow/corner of eye socket
3. base knuckle of pointer finger under ear behind jaw
4. pull shoulder blades down and together

Once that's done I can aim, then expand/push a button with my string hand elbow to "squeeze the trigger" as it were.
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