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Old 06-26-2022, 07:21 AM   #1
sharkhunter
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Default Fawn Predation

Ok so we know coyotes, bobcats and feral dogs are bad on a fawn crop but what about big raccoons and wild hogs. Our lease has a very high population of both. I’m leaning more towards a big male raccoon being more of a fawn predator than people think. After reading about raccoons being one of the main predators of fawns at deer farm fawning pens. Anybody have any first hand experiences on this ? Our fawns at our lease took a big hit last year. I hit the coyotes hard but think I might be missing another fawn predator (raccoon) that’s right in front of me.

Also I’m thinking the first three weeks a fawn is on the ground before he gets his legs under him is when it’s most likely to take place. My suspicion is larger coons in the 15 to 20 lb range. That’s a pretty good size predator and not much smaller than a young coyote. We lost almost 100% of our fawn crop last year so I’m looking at it from all angles.

Last edited by sharkhunter; 06-26-2022 at 07:59 AM.
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Old 06-26-2022, 07:24 AM   #2
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Following.

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Old 06-26-2022, 07:25 AM   #3
fish4food
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Wouldn’t hurt to ever take out any coons.

They kill the heck out of quail and turkey if you’ve got any.
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Old 06-26-2022, 07:29 AM   #4
Leon County Slayer
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I’m probably wrong but of think in an open wolf environment cons wouldn’t be much of a threat. I’d focus more on bobcats myself
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Old 06-26-2022, 08:09 AM   #5
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Hogs will not seek out fawns, but if they come across one, they will kill it and eat it.
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Old 06-26-2022, 09:11 AM   #6
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Iím probably wrong but of think in an open wolf environment cons wouldnít be much of a threat. Iíd focus more on bobcats myself
What is an ďopen wolf environmentĒ ?
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Old 06-26-2022, 07:04 PM   #7
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Iím probably wrong but of think in an open wolf environment cons wouldnít be much of a threat. Iíd focus more on bobcats myself


Looks like when I try talk to text
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Old 06-27-2022, 05:59 PM   #8
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Coyote and bobcat are the biggest threats. We kill every predator we can kill. Canít hurt


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Old 06-28-2022, 10:30 AM   #9
Brute Killer
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I know a guy that claims coons would kill his kid goats. Not much difference between kids and fawns.
My brother said a caracara killed a fawn that had been living in his yard.
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Old 06-28-2022, 10:36 AM   #10
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Those coons will be a hell of a lot easier to catch than coyotes. The way you kill coyotes, you could probably wipe out all the coons on the place in a couple days.
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Old 06-28-2022, 04:47 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Brute Killer View Post
Those coons will be a hell of a lot easier to catch than coyotes. The way you kill coyotes, you could probably wipe out all the coons on the place in a couple days.
Oh Iíll put a hurting on them lol ! I probably killed 30 as bycatch last winter. I think Iím going to add them to my hit list this coming fall.
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Old 06-28-2022, 05:21 PM   #12
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I think fawns like Quail are the potato chip of all predators. Easy to catch and kill. I wouldn't be surprised if black headed buzzards and Mexican Eagles don't kill as many as any varmint.
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Old 06-28-2022, 05:48 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Brute Killer View Post
I know a guy that claims coons would kill his kid goats. Not much difference between kids and fawns.
My brother said a caracara killed a fawn that had been living in his yard.
^^Yup

Caracara do not hesitate to kill small kid goats, fawns or new lambs. They are smart and fly when approaching in a vehicle while most buzzards will hang out. Had one on a game camera at a water trough couple years ago.
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Old 06-28-2022, 06:01 PM   #14
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I just don’t think coons are a major predator of fawns. I have trapped coons for years, have run coon hounds, and spotlighted coons via rivers and upland, and have never come across any evidence to suggest coons acted as a predator of larger animals except a few chickens/domestic waterfowl, etc. Perhaps some may take an occasional fawn, but I just don’t think they would make a major dent in the fawn population. I have a friend and had an uncle that bred and raised deer in high fence pastures where coons were plentiful, and they never had any problems with coons short of eating supplements.

Keep in mind that controlling coyotes during fall and winter (even culling heavily) may not have a big effect on fawn pressure. This is often due to transient populations of coyotes quickly moving in to replace residents that were removed.
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Old 06-28-2022, 06:30 PM   #15
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I just don’t think coons are a major predator of fawns. I have trapped coons for years, have run coon hounds, and spotlighted coons via rivers and upland, and have never come across any evidence to suggest coons acted as a predator of larger animals except a few chickens/domestic waterfowl, etc. Perhaps some may take an occasional fawn, but I just don’t think they would make a major dent in the fawn population. I have a friend and had an uncle that bred and raised deer in high fence pastures where coons were plentiful, and they never had any problems with coons short of eating supplements.

Keep in mind that controlling coyotes during fall and winter (even culling heavily) may not have a big effect on fawn pressure. This is often due to transient populations of coyotes quickly moving in to replace residents that were removed.
To be effective you have to trap right up to fawning time. Transients filter in really slow. I had traps in the dirt for 90 days prior to fawning and after catching the resident yotes the first month I worked on the transients. I went from catching 4 and 5 coyotes a week down to 1 every two weeks. I keep a really close watch on our lease roads checking tracks as it’s only 20 min from my house. After driving 15 miles of lease roads every week checking tracks we are good. I did not find a single coyote track in the last month. Those same roads had tracks every 20 ft it seemed last summer. Per the biologist I talked to I need to try and buy the fawns 3 weeks. After that the survival rate is really good. Funny thing is a lot of studies contradict each other with some stating heavy rains of 1 inch or more during fawning season as the biggest killer by far. Fawns can’t regulate body temps in the first month of life and up to 50% die of hypothermia. Sucks to be a fawn :-/

Last edited by sharkhunter; 06-28-2022 at 07:29 PM.
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Old 06-29-2022, 01:19 PM   #16
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To be effective you have to trap right up to fawning time. Transients filter in really slow. I had traps in the dirt for 90 days prior to fawning and after catching the resident yotes the first month I worked on the transients. I went from catching 4 and 5 coyotes a week down to 1 every two weeks. I keep a really close watch on our lease roads checking tracks as itís only 20 min from my house. After driving 15 miles of lease roads every week checking tracks we are good. I did not find a single coyote track in the last month. Those same roads had tracks every 20 ft it seemed last summer. Per the biologist I talked to I need to try and buy the fawns 3 weeks. After that the survival rate is really good. Funny thing is a lot of studies contradict each other with some stating heavy rains of 1 inch or more during fawning season as the biggest killer by far. Fawns canít regulate body temps in the first month of life and up to 50% die of hypothermia. Sucks to be a fawn :-/

I'd agree with that. We had a ton of rain and flooding last year during fawning season and had zero fawns survive. Seen a couple outside feeder pens already so I know we are doing better this year despite it being dry.

How is the learning curve on trapping coyotes? Calling doesn't do much on our property, and I'd like to do more predator control, but not sure if it's worth taking the plunge on equipment. How long do you leave traps between setting and checking them?
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Old 06-29-2022, 04:16 PM   #17
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Oh Iíll put a hurting on them lol ! I probably killed 30 as bycatch last winter. I think Iím going to add them to my hit list this coming fall.
I've decided I need to trap the coons heavy for a couple weeks before I ever set one coyote trap. I've bought more dog proofs. They are just so easy that it doesn't make sense to not use them.
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Old 06-29-2022, 04:18 PM   #18
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I think fawns like Quail are the potato chip of all predators. Easy to catch and kill. I wouldn't be surprised if black headed buzzards and Mexican Eagles don't kill as many as any varmint.
Good analogy. Potato chips.
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Old 06-29-2022, 04:30 PM   #19
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Mother nature plays a big role in predation opportunities for your main case of characters. Coyotes and bobcats find it much easier when drought has burned up cover and vegetation.
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Old 06-29-2022, 05:27 PM   #20
sharkhunter
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Originally Posted by Brute Killer View Post
I've decided I need to trap the coons heavy for a couple weeks before I ever set one coyote trap. I've bought more dog proofs. They are just so easy that it doesn't make sense to not use them.
Thatís a good plan. Dang coons can flat mess up a set. After I caught some of the same coons 3 and 4 times they all went over rainbow 🌈 bridge. A friend of mine has about 200 dog proofs. I need to talk him out of 50 or so I think.
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Old 06-29-2022, 05:39 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by txbowman12 View Post
I'd agree with that. We had a ton of rain and flooding last year during fawning season and had zero fawns survive. Seen a couple outside feeder pens already so I know we are doing better this year despite it being dry.

How is the learning curve on trapping coyotes? Calling doesn't do much on our property, and I'd like to do more predator control, but not sure if it's worth taking the plunge on equipment. How long do you leave traps between setting and checking them?
I’ll be honest even with all my experience as a kid trapping, calling and hunting. Coyote’s truly humbled me. I made some really big mistakes starting off and educated about 7 or 8 coyotes. I then not only had to learn the right way to trap them but also the “art” of catching educated coyotes. I spent 100 days straight in the woods every morning till noon. I’m lucky I work for myself and my schedule allowed that. I probably got the equivalent of 3 or 4 years of trapping experience in just one year. After i realize what a coyote truly was it opened up a whole new world for me. A coyote is a thief that is extremely territorial but at the same time paranoid and smarter than any animal in the woods. Once you grasp that and let that guide you in how you approach how you go after them it’s a blast. Basically you have to think like a coyote.

I’ll be honest the best way for a new person to score on coyotes is snaring. It’s cheap, relatively easy and inexpensive. Also it’s extremely effective !!

I checked my traps every 24hrs. I’m going to a full 36hrs next year. By law that as long as you can go. Coyotes are like any other game animal. If they feel pressure they get hard to hunt quick!

Last edited by sharkhunter; 06-29-2022 at 05:46 PM.
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Old 06-30-2022, 10:20 AM   #22
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When we took out 168 hogs in 3 months on 80 acres, our fawn crop exploded. Nearly every doe had a surviving fawn.
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Old 06-30-2022, 04:04 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by Drycreek3189 View Post
What is an ďopen wolf environmentĒ ?
Quote:
Originally Posted by BTLowry View Post


Looks like when I try talk to text
BT nailed it....I am soooo bad at talking to text or I slur my words - my wife tried to convince me years ago to stop using that feature because she knows I don't proof read my texts......oh the texts that have been sent on accident!! haaaaa
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Old 06-30-2022, 04:10 PM   #24
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How are the wasps?
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Old 06-30-2022, 07:19 PM   #25
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How are the wasps?
Lol.
Lots of wasps = lots of fawns!
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Old 07-01-2022, 08:07 AM   #26
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When we took out 168 hogs in 3 months on 80 acres, our fawn crop exploded. Nearly every doe had a surviving fawn.
We try and shoot as many as we can. I think I shot 30 and the wife shot about 50. Itís a never ending problem that going to require a radical approach thatís not going to sit well with some.
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