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txpitdog 06-12-2019 07:16 AM

Engineers
 
1 Attachment(s)
Lol

Texas Pride 06-12-2019 07:31 AM

lol

UncleBubba 06-12-2019 07:36 AM

I love when a very educated engineer comes to our small machine shop and asks this college dropout to design something for him/her. Can't beat experience away from a computer.

SaltwaterSlick 06-12-2019 08:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by UncleBubba (Post 14193811)
I love when a very educated engineer comes to our small machine shop and asks this college dropout to design something for him/her. Can't beat experience away from a computer.

Yes sir you can... Experience AND education...
I been at it for 40 years... When folks ask me if I'm an en-ga-near, I tell 'em, "Yea, but I do my best not to ACT like one!"... ;)b

ktjones 06-12-2019 08:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SaltwaterSlick (Post 14193851)
Yes sir you can... Experience AND education...
I been at it for 40 years... When folks ask me if I'm an en-ga-near, I tell 'em, "Yea, but I do my best not to ACT like one!"... ;)b

30+ years in the trade, and that is how I try to act. KJ

Blank 06-12-2019 11:11 AM

Welders - like engineers, but with common sense!!

Dusty8186 06-12-2019 11:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by UncleBubba (Post 14193811)
I love when a very educated engineer comes to our small machine shop and asks this college dropout to design something for him/her. Can't beat experience away from a computer.

THIS! all the time in our shop

Hoggslayer 06-12-2019 11:28 AM

I've been a welder/fabricator most of my life and now I work in engineering at NASA. There are some smart guys that work here but we have our fair share of special ones.

miket 06-12-2019 11:34 AM

As a machinist in my 26th year thats hilarious, and I do know its pretty easy for a guy on the shop floor to make fun of them, but I have learned to appreciate a good engineer!

JonBoy 06-12-2019 12:43 PM

The term "engineer" is a huge umbrella...I hate to break it to you but not all engineers are (or want to be) designers. Most engineers are highly specialized and aren't Jacks of all trades. I've been a circuit board designer and embedded programmer for nearly 15 years and I wouldn't hesitate to find a machinist and ask them to design me a mechanical fixture b/c I know they could do a far better job than if I tried to cobble something together.

KX500 06-12-2019 12:44 PM

That an Engineer will be: A) intelligent and B) have a lot of knowledge, is a given. You don't get though an Engineering program without A & if you do get though that program you'll have acquired B.

The real question with Engineers is can they do anything with that intelligence & knowledge? And do they have any mechanical aptitude?

Working as an Mechanical Engineer for a long time (graduated in 1990), I've met & worked with a lot of other Engineers. None were dumb, but many looked that way at times due to an inability to apply that knowledge and/or a lack of mechanical aptitude.

The best Engineers I've known have been either farm boys or guys who had long time hobbies that involved mechanical things that they had to work on/repair/modify/improve.

Unfortunately, there are lots of 'know it all' Engineers out there too. Very hard to deal with since they are never wrong or never want to admit there is something they don't know.

Other Engineers don't like those Engineers either.

deerplanter 06-12-2019 12:49 PM

Millwrights/Machinists makes engineers look good all the time!

SwampRabbit 06-12-2019 01:05 PM

I think 90% of the time - it is because engineers are not taught how to communicate with the non-engineering community. It is a soft skill that an engineer has to learn if they want to be successful or less frustrated in their career.

Bullseye07 06-12-2019 01:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SwampRabbit (Post 14194302)
I think 90% of the time - it is because engineers are not taught how to communicate with the non-engineering community. It is a soft skill that an engineer has to learn if they want to be successful or less frustrated in their career.

This is very true. I’ve worked with several engineers across varying fields(mechanical, structural, electrical, etc). Some of those people were incredibly smart, but they lacked the ability to communicate effectively. Sometimes we’re just too dumb to understand what they’re saying.

175gr7.62 06-12-2019 01:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KX500 (Post 14194273)
That an Engineer will be: A) intelligent and B) have a lot of knowledge, is a given. You don't get though an Engineering program without A & if you do get though that program you'll have acquired B.

The real question with Engineers is can they do anything with that intelligence & knowledge? And do they have any mechanical aptitude?

Working as an Mechanical Engineer for a long time (graduated in 1990), I've met & worked with a lot of other Engineers. None were dumb, but many looked that way at times due to an inability to apply that knowledge and/or a lack of mechanical aptitude.

The best Engineers I've known have been either farm boys or guys who had long time hobbies that involved mechanical things that they had to work on/repair/modify/improve.

Unfortunately, there are lots of 'know it all' Engineers out there too. Very hard to deal with since they are never wrong or never want to admit there is something they don't know.

Other Engineers don't like those Engineers either.



I have interviewed hundreds of people for engineering positions and it’s hard to find folks with good practical skills in conjunction sound engineering knowledge. I always look for guys that used to be welders/machinists/mechanics/plumbers and then went to engineering school. One question I always ask is if they can tell me the firing order of a small block Chevrolet.

I had a female intern once call out a RH thread on a part when it needed to be LH due to it being a rotating device. When the error was discovered on the prototype she asked why we couldn’t just turn the threaded stud around that went into the hole......


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

ktjones 06-12-2019 01:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bullseye07 (Post 14194314)
This is very true. I’ve worked with several engineers across varying fields(mechanical, structural, electrical, etc). Some of those people were incredibly smart, but they lacked the ability to communicate effectively. Sometimes we’re just too dumb to understand what they’re saying.

When I worked product design and firmware design at a large computer / server / storage / networking company in NW Houston awhile back, we referred to that type of engineer as a 'pancake and pizza' engineer. Slide the pancakes and pizza under the door. Never let them talk to a perspective customer! KJ

SaltwaterSlick 06-12-2019 03:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 175gr7.62 (Post 14194336)
I have interviewed hundreds of people for engineering positions and it’s hard to find folks with good practical skills in conjunction sound engineering knowledge. I always look for guys that used to be welders/machinists/mechanics/plumbers and then went to engineering school. One question I always ask is if they can tell me the firing order of a small block Chevrolet.

I had a female intern once call out a RH thread on a part when it needed to be LH due to it being a rotating device. When the error was discovered on the prototype she asked why we couldn’t just turn the threaded stud around that went into the hole......


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Something else that might help you, is to ask for a "Marine" engineer as opposed to a mech.E... Marine engineers are Mech.E's with a lot of hands on training and less theory... Marine engineers must know how things are designed, but the also must know how to fix 'em when they break... You don't pull something out and "send it in for repair" when you're a thousand miles from land... you gotta know how to make do and pull wrenches, weld, bend grind and such... One of my degrees is in Marine Engineering... Comin' from a farm background, helped though I must say... I could already weld/burn and read a measuring tape before I left for school...

Ask a prospect to give you the measurement of something using a standard old Stanley metal tape... That'll tell you a lot too! It's 24 inches and 3 of those little marks... :rolleyes:;)b

UncleBubba 06-12-2019 03:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by miket (Post 14194181)
As a machinist in my 26th year thats hilarious, and I do know its pretty easy for a guy on the shop floor to make fun of them, but I have learned to appreciate a good engineer!

I love good engineers. They bring me a picture and say build this please :D ;)b

Pstraw 06-12-2019 03:41 PM

Tractor design isn't too bad but I wish EVERY automotive engineer had to spend at least two years in a repair shop. That way we wouldn't have to burn the hide off our arms trying to get to the oil filter or have to pull the cab off a pickup to get to the engine.

175gr7.62 06-12-2019 04:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SaltwaterSlick (Post 14194499)
Something else that might help you, is to ask for a "Marine" engineer as opposed to a mech.E... Marine engineers are Mech.E's with a lot of hands on training and less theory... Marine engineers must know how things are designed, but the also must know how to fix 'em when they break... You don't pull something out and "send it in for repair" when you're a thousand miles from land... you gotta know how to make do and pull wrenches, weld, bend grind and such... One of my degrees is in Marine Engineering... Comin' from a farm background, helped though I must say... I could already weld/burn and read a measuring tape before I left for school...

Ask a prospect to give you the measurement of something using a standard old Stanley metal tape... That'll tell you a lot too! It's 24 inches and 3 of those little marks... :rolleyes:;)b

One of the best engineers I ever hired or worked with was a Russian cat that managed to get to the US back in 96. He had a Masters Degree from St. Petersburg Polytechnic and had been a submarine officer in the Russian Navy. That sucker could do anything. He said he had to be good because Russian subs were pieces of sheet and if you couldn't fix them you were dead.

geezer56 06-12-2019 08:39 PM

I got my degree at the tender age of 33. Work 45-55 hours a week and take night classes. I had 14 years experience with boilers, water treatment, and was certified to weld vertical, flat, and overhead. The shop guys loved me, because they knew if I drew it, it could be made from my prints. I had worked with all of them. They trusted me. The engineers that already knew it all were a major annoyance to me. I'm 68 now, and retired.

DapperDan 06-12-2019 08:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hoggslayer (Post 14194171)
I've been a welder/fabricator most of my life and now I work in engineering at NASA. There are some smart guys that work here but we have our fair share of special ones.



My wife’s senior design project was with NASA. She’s a mechanical engineer off 290 and Telge in Houston. She would love to work for nasa. Lol


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double bogey 06-12-2019 09:04 PM

I have seen a few in the mechanical contracting business. I could tell from a machine room setup if the design guy had a marine background or not. Pump packings and non sealed bearings. You don't under or over tighten a mechanical seal, and you don't over or under lube a sealed bearing. Now, that's just my preference. They typically aren't teaching that in schools nowadays.
Seen lots of hvac designs that were out there. And when the building wont cool, and the system is running at capacity, it must be the contractors fault. I will say most of the building problems I have seen are air balance, after 3 different tenant finish contractors monkeyed with the original design, without ever looking at it.

WhiplashTX 06-12-2019 09:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pstraw (Post 14194535)
Tractor design isn't too bad but I wish EVERY automotive engineer had to spend at least two years in a repair shop. That way we wouldn't have to burn the hide off our arms trying to get to the oil filter or have to pull the cab off a pickup to get to the engine.

You should see what it's like working on semiconductor manufacturing equipment. It can take 4-5 hours to replace a part held on by two screws because of all the other crap in the way. It gets even more difficult considering how complex some of the systems are. A stepper involves mechanical, electrical, robotic, pneumatic, fiber optic, optical, electro magnetic, and gas laser systems all rolled into one machine.

HogHunter34 06-12-2019 10:47 PM

I agree there are some that can grasp the concepts in an educational setting but struggle to apply their knowledge in a real world application. I’m not a design engineer but I have taken an engineering product design course in my past. I had to do a design project to reduce cost in manufacturing an injection molded part.
I work as a process engineer & enjoy more of hands on approach & not sit at a computer all day. Most of my computer work is crunching data analysis on process capability.

cfortner 06-12-2019 11:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 175gr7.62 (Post 14194336)
One question I always ask is if they can tell me the firing order of a small block Chevrolet.

Do you give them extra points if they have to map it out with their fingers or on a paper?

Texas Tracker 06-13-2019 07:05 AM

Engineer's they can tell you how everything works but they can't work on everything.
My father is a very successful Engineer from TI. That's why I am a Technician. ;)b

My Dad retired from TI and had a lot to do with them being where they are today. Smart man and a great dad. He led the design team for the LED read out. Tomahawk Guidance system, TI computers and their TI 84 calculates, he did it all. Holds a patent on the Aluminum retention maze and getter


Abstract
Aluminum or aluminum foil is placed in communication with the interior of a cold cathode gas discharge display chamber to prevent undesirable quantities of mercury from entering the display chamber and to absorb undesirable O.sub.2 and H.sub.2 O which may evolve during the life of the display device.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Inventors: Paine, Jr.; Rigaud B. (Dallas, TX), Peshock, Jr.; Michael (Richardson, TX)
Assignee: Texas Instruments Incorporated (Dallas, TX)

Appl. No.: 05/459,819
Filed: April 10, 1974

Hooverfb 06-13-2019 08:59 AM

Yup. Goes for people of all trades. Had guys like that in the steel mill,and I know guys like that wearing the engineer/software developer/engineer badge now too.

Experience doesnt always help either... got a guy who could be my dads dad that recently refused to do something that helps give diagnostic information to users cause "it's too hard".

Chief Big Toe 06-13-2019 09:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by UncleBubba (Post 14193811)
I love when a very educated engineer comes to our small machine shop and asks this college dropout to design something for him/her. Can't beat experience away from a computer.

^^^^^^^^^ This..;)b see this on a daily basis.... common sense was not on the learning schedule.. for some of them :eek:

SwampRabbit 06-13-2019 09:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Texas Tracker (Post 14195512)
Engineer's they can tell you how everything works but they can't work on everything.
My father is a very successful Engineer from TI. That's why I am a Technician. ;)b

My Dad retired from TI and had a lot to do with them being where they are today. Smart man and a great dad. He led the design team for the LED read out. Tomahawk Guidance system, TI computers and their TI 84 calculates, he did it all. Holds a patent on the Aluminum retention maze and getter


Abstract
Aluminum or aluminum foil is placed in communication with the interior of a cold cathode gas discharge display chamber to prevent undesirable quantities of mercury from entering the display chamber and to absorb undesirable O.sub.2 and H.sub.2 O which may evolve during the life of the display device.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Inventors: Paine, Jr.; Rigaud B. (Dallas, TX), Peshock, Jr.; Michael (Richardson, TX)
Assignee: Texas Instruments Incorporated (Dallas, TX)

Appl. No.: 05/459,819
Filed: April 10, 1974

Love this post!

SwampRabbit 06-13-2019 09:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ktjones (Post 14194370)
When I worked product design and firmware design at a large computer / server / storage / networking company in NW Houston awhile back, we referred to that type of engineer as a 'pancake and pizza' engineer. Slide the pancakes and pizza under the door. Never let them talk to a perspective customer! KJ

Small world! ;)b

Phillip Fields 06-13-2019 11:05 AM

Experience is not always what its cracked up to be. I've known some that had 20 (or more) years of experience and some that had 1 year of experience 20 (or more) times.

SaltwaterSlick 06-13-2019 12:18 PM

Works both ways... You can have years and years of experience at doing things VERY wrong and get REALLY good at same as you can being very GOOD at doing things RIGHT...

Goldeneagle 06-13-2019 01:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Texas Tracker (Post 14195512)
Engineer's they can tell you how everything works but they can't work on everything.
My father is a very successful Engineer from TI. That's why I am a Technician. ;)b

My Dad retired from TI and had a lot to do with them being where they are today. Smart man and a great dad. He led the design team for the LED read out. Tomahawk Guidance system, TI computers and their TI 84 calculates, he did it all. Holds a patent on the Aluminum retention maze and getter


Abstract
Aluminum or aluminum foil is placed in communication with the interior of a cold cathode gas discharge display chamber to prevent undesirable quantities of mercury from entering the display chamber and to absorb undesirable O.sub.2 and H.sub.2 O which may evolve during the life of the display device.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Inventors: Paine, Jr.; Rigaud B. (Dallas, TX), Peshock, Jr.; Michael (Richardson, TX)
Assignee: Texas Instruments Incorporated (Dallas, TX)

Appl. No.: 05/459,819
Filed: April 10, 1974

When did your dad retire Rig? I hired in TI in '76 with the semiconductor division. I worked on the calculator and computer cases. I might have known him. I went to defense in '91.
Quote:

Originally Posted by Chief Big Toe (Post 14195709)
^^^^^^^^^ This..;)b see this on a daily basis.... common sense was not on the learning schedule.. for some of them :eek:

yeah y'all like it because you can send it down here. :)

Texas Tracker 06-13-2019 01:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Goldeneagle (Post 14196185)
When did your dad retire Rig? I hired in TI in '76 with the semiconductor division. I worked on the calculator and computer cases. I might have known him. I went to defense in '91.

yeah y'all like it because you can send it down here. :)

I want to say he retired in 96. We worked at the main plant on 35 starting in 1963 then at the Sherman plant after that Lemon Ave then Lubbock and right before he retired back to 35. Do you remember a guy named Bill Bush we worked with my dad on and off on different projects. If you worked in the semiconductor division you knew him until we moved to Lubbock in 1979.

dfkoon 06-13-2019 09:02 PM

OP was funny. Some of the other guys....

Goldeneagle 06-14-2019 06:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Texas Tracker (Post 14196232)
I want to say he retired in 96. We worked at the main plant on 35 starting in 1963 then at the Sherman plant after that Lemon Ave then Lubbock and right before he retired back to 35. Do you remember a guy named Bill Bush we worked with my dad on and off on different projects. If you worked in the semiconductor division you knew him until we moved to Lubbock in 1979.

I probably hadn't met them yet if you moved in '79. From '76 till '81 I was on graveyard. I hadn't met many folks yet. All my time was spent at the main plant on 75 and then down here to Lemmon in '91. There is a chance I met them but didn't know their names.

skeeter 06-14-2019 06:53 AM

There's a big difference between educated and smart

treestand 06-14-2019 07:55 AM

A new engineer has proven he can learn but next he needs to realize he has a lot to learn. Like most, I thought I knew everything when I got out of college. Fortunately, some designers taught me otherwise. With about 10 years of experience, engineers begin to actually earn their pay. If they've had some good experience.

The least likely engineer to work out is the one that graduated top of his class. He or she has no experience with humility.


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