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Old 06-13-2014, 06:52 PM   #1
Chunky
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Default We Should Do a Book

With all the great hunters and stories we have here, Bisch's recent bear hunt, any number of Buff's hunts, etc

We should put together a book of the best ones, a story or two from each contributer, and then self publish it like Buff did. I think that would be cool.

We would need someone to be the editor and organizer (not it!) and the population here to help pick which are the best ones.

Just an idea.
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Old 06-13-2014, 08:55 PM   #2
sweetinlow660
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I like It!!
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Old 06-13-2014, 09:20 PM   #3
bassmatt72
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Sounds like a good idea....I just wish I had a hunt that would be worthy of writing. I have some great hunts but they are all compound, still trying for a trad harvest.
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Old 06-13-2014, 10:13 PM   #4
Loreva13
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Very cool idea!
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Old 06-14-2014, 09:51 AM   #5
Texas5o
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I'll start it Mark.

RAM WITH A LONGBOW


I had never hunted any type of exotic animal before and was excited just to be on a ranch that had several different species of exotics. I was on the Crystal Creek Ranch near Del Rio, Texas, to co-host a bow hunting show. I would not be one of the hunters but would get to be involved with them for several weeks of filming. The first day I was on the ranch, the owner drove us around to show us the place. While we were driving around we saw a number of exotics including aoudad, blackbuck, axis, and several different kinds of sheep. When we saw a group of rams running off I commented that I would like to book a hunt for a ram there once we had finished filming the show. Arrangements were made and I ended up hunting there for three days with my Sarrels two-piece takedown longbow.
I found a low spot in a road where the road crossed a slight draw. The animals seemed to like to cross there so I concentrated on that area and stayed away from the many feeders on the ranch. I put some corn and some “Beast Feast” in the roadway and set up a stool in the brush about 10 yards from the road on the downwind side and cut out one small shooting lane. I was wearing a leafy wear outer garment so I blended in quite well to the surrounding brush. The first evening I had several animals come in and even had a whitetail doe walk within 5 yards of me and she never saw me. I never got a ram in my shooting lane but it was exciting to have animals so close and not know I was there.
Day two was a repeat of day one except that I did get a ram into position and started to draw on him. At least one of the sheep in that group saw me move and bolted, taking the ram with them. The brush there was only a few feet tall. I thought I was concealed enough in it but realized that they must have been able to see me over the brush when I moved to draw. I decided I had to do something different for my last day.
Back at camp, I sat on the ground and practiced for a couple hours shooting from that position. It was difficult because I had to hold the longbow sideways, parallel to the ground, to be able to shoot while sitting on the ground. I eventually got comfortable shooting from that position and was ready to hunt again. I went back to the same area on day three and set up with me sitting on the ground instead of on the stool. This time I was only about 5 yards from the edge of the road. The sheep had apparently fallen in love with the “Beast Feast” because they were there like clockwork again on the third day. I had made a basketball sized hole in the brush to shoot through and that’s about all I could see as well. A nice ram came into my shooting hole and was about 7 yards from me. When he turned broadside to me I began to draw. He turned again before I could get a shot off so I had to let down. Another time I started to draw and another sheep got between us. Other times there were other sheep behind him. I was beginning to think he was going to move away before I got a shot at him. Finally, after having started to draw on him several times, he got into position again without any other sheep in the way. I was able to get the shot off and connect. The sheep all scattered at the shot and I raised up enough to see the ram go into some brush across the road. I never saw him exit so I figured he was down there. It took me several minutes to get my feet under me because I had been sitting there without moving for so long that my legs had gone to sleep. I finally got up and went to find my sheep. As I crossed the road, to my amazement, I saw him leave the security of the brush I had seen him enter and walk away. The arrow was still in him and appeared to have hit him in the shoulder instead of behind it. I watched him until he laid down on the edge of a small road. I was downwind and it was going to get dark soon so I started trying to stalk up on him. I got to within about 30 yards when another ram came walking down the road and walked right up to my downed ram. In a couple minutes my ram got up and they both walked away across the road and over the hill. I ran up the hill to see if I could see where they went. By the time I got to the top of the hill, they were at least 100 yards down the other side and still walking. I decided to back out and wait until the next morning to track him. That ended up being a good decision. We were able to recover the ram the following morning.
That ram is still the only exotic animal I have ever taken. He hangs on the wall in my living room and I am extremely proud of him, not only because he is such a good looking ram, but also because of the way I had to change things up the way I did to be able to harvest him.
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Old 06-14-2014, 10:05 AM   #6
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Here's another one I wrote up a few years ago:

MY BIGGEST BUCK YET!!!!!!


I shot this buck on Monday evening, Oct. 13th. Bob Sarrels had invited me to hunt with him this week. He took my place on a lease I have been on with Bisch for the past 5 years. Bisch shot a really nice 8 pt. on opening day and had a few more nice bucks on his trail cam pic's.
I hunted the same stand where Bisch shot his 8 pt. On Sunday evening I saw a decent 9 pt., a decent 10 pt., a cull 6 pt. and a spike/fork (that I missed). On Monday evening I went back to that stand again. I settled in (about 30 feet up) and immediately had what I thought was the spike/fork back in there. (He ended up being a fork on both sides). As soon as he cleared the brush I shot him. He was quartered away and I hit him a bit far back. I heard him crash fairly close, though, so I was confident he was down.
I decided to sit there and see what else would come in, since the feeder hadn't even gone off yet. The 9 pt. came back in a short time before the feeder went off. A little while after the feeder went off, the cull 6 pt. came in. I decided I would shoot the 6 pt. Before he got into my shooting lane, however, I noticed another deer coming. It was a large 8 pt.
I had been told that there were no restrictions as to what I could shoot, so I began trying to judge the 8 pt. He looked like a mature deer and was certainly bigger than anything I had ever shot before. After a short time he was standing in almost the exact spot the smaller buck had been when I shot him a little while earlier. I took the shot. Again, I hit him farther back than I wanted, but it did the trick. He went about 100 yards before piling up in a thick area of cactus and underbrush.
I tracked, found, and field dressed the smaller buck and dragged him about 300 yards before deciding I couldn't wait any longer to go and look for the 8 point. He left a good blood trail and was not terribly hard to find. I dragged him about 30 yards out of the thick stuff and into an opening where I knew I would be able to find him in the dark.
I went to get Bob and found that he also had shot a buck. He had shot a 2 1/2 year old spike.
It had been raining all day and I only have a two wheeled drive pickup. We were now trying to decide how long it was going to take us to drag 3 deer the mile back to camp. We ended up calling a friend in Tilden (Scott Shallcross) who graciously came to our rescue with his 4 wheel drive pickup. Scott came out and we loaded the deer in his truck and he let us store them in a walk-in cooler he had in town.
The 8 point weighed 210 pounds on the hoof. He was later scored at 130" gross, 127 5/8" net......my first to qualify for Pope & Young.
I was shooting 50# Sarrels Superstition, two-piece take-down longbow, aluminum arrows, and a 140 grain Magnus 2 blade broadhead with a 100 grain steel insert.
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Old 06-14-2014, 10:06 AM   #7
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I couldn't figure out how to pull the picture from the previous post and put it on this one
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Old 06-14-2014, 10:09 AM   #8
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May have figured out the picture thing
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Old 06-14-2014, 10:32 AM   #9
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OK, One more and I'm done:

TURKEYS, TURKEYS, TURKEYS!!!

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I finally got to go turkey hunting this past week. We usually have quite a few turkeys on the place, but my hunting partner, Bisch, has been and wasn't seeing nearly as many as usual.
I was not expecting to see much, but I just wanted to spend a few days at the camp to get away from the routine at work and such.
I arrived at camp around 9:00 pm on Monday night and got things ready to go hunting the following morning. I went out to the "Astro Blind", a homemade blind made from a cattle panel, indoor/outdoor carpet, some pvc pipe, and a tarp to cover the top (with shoot-through netting over the windows). This blind sits in close proximity to a feeder and I figured that was my best chance this late in the season. I did set out one hen decoy about 15 yards from the feeder (looking out a different window). Fairly early in the morning I had two hens come in to the feeder, followed closely by three pretty good gobblers. The first gobbler came straight in to the feeder and offered me a shot right away. I drew my 58" Sarrels take down longbow (Superstition model), anchored and let the Magnus 2 blade tipped Axis arrow fly. Oops! I forgot to pick a spot and creased the tom's back. The arrow buried in the mud under the feeder and the guy just jumped out of the way and went back to eating. I watched for a few minutes, hoping for another opportunity and one of the gobblers starting strutting his stuff. He eventually "deflated" and got to eating. He worked his way into my shooting lane and, once again, I drew, anchored, and let fly. He was facing to my left and the arrow hit a little to the right, going through him somewhere in his back half. He flew off, carrying my arrow. It seemed that I could hear him flying forever. At this point, I was getting a bit upset at myself for not shooting better, but thankful for the shot opportunities. I figured I had blown it for the morning, but gobbler #3 was still in the area, along with the hens. He never would give me a shot at him near the feeder, but there is a very small window in the blind, also covered with netting, that we put there just to be able to see a little in that direction. Gobbler #3 decided to leave in that direction and there was just enough room through the brush to get an arrow through there. I got up out of my seat, knelt down to where I could shoot out that window, and waited for him to get to the small "shooting lane". He obliged and once again the arrow sailed a bit high, clipping a few feathers off his back. Needless to say, I was beside myself! Three shots in less than 15 minutes and nothing to show for it yet.
After I was sure all the birds were gone, I got out of the blind to pick up arrows and to see if I could find any sign of the one I hit. I hadn't been out of the blind more than a couple minutes when 6 hogs came out of the brush and toward the feeder. They saw me, standing in the wide open, but two of them came on in to the feeder. I was about 20 yards away, nocked up and ready, but decided not to take a shot. I was about half a mile from camp and the place was really muddy. I can't drive my truck in there when it's like that and I really didn't want to have to drag a hog all the way back to camp....so I just watched them for a couple minutes until they decided they didn't like me standing there and they left. I continued my search for arrows/bird for a while, unable to find any sign of the gobbler I had hit, but I did recover the other two arrows.
Since it was still early, I got back into the blind to see if anything else would come in. I worked the slate call a bit from time to time and got a few answers, but they seemed very far away. After about an hour of calling every 20 minutes or so, I got a gobble from somewhere behind me, fairly close. A few minutes later two hens came in to the feeder. Within a minute two gobblers came running past my shooting window, at about 5 yards, and straight to the hen decoy. I didn't have time to move my camera, but did get another shot. The shot looked a bit low and I thought I had missed again. The two gobblers moved to my right to where I couldn't see them any more. After a few minutes the two hens went the same direction, out into an open area about 50 yards from my blind. I saw one of the gobblers come back to the hens, then another one joined him. They were strutting beautifully. I got out the slate again and began making very light sounds with it. Almost every time I made some noise with the slate, one of the gobblers would give me a good gobble......but they wouldn't come back to the decoy. I filmed this show for at least 10 minutes, until the hens worked their way too far behind me to see. The gobblers followed. About a half hour later I got out of the blind to go and get my fourth arrow. I found it easily and noticed that it had feathers and a little blood on it. I began looking on the ground in the area where the gobblers had gone when I shot and found quite a bit of blood on the ground. I have never blood trailed a turkey, but I did this time. I was able to follow the blood trail for about 50 yards. I was having a hard time finding anything else until I heard something in a small thicket near the edge of the open area. When I looked, I saw the turkey moving through the brush. I got to the other side and the turkey took off out the side I had been on. I took a fleeting shot at him, but missed (imagine that!). I watched him cross a sendero and enter the brush on the other side. I decided not to chase him and went back to the blind. I spent about 20 minutes or so gathering up all my gear, puting my camera up, etc. I then went back to where I had seen the gobbler enter the brush to see what I could find. I found one large spot of blood about 5 yards inside the brush, then nothing else. There were two trails leading from there and I followed both of them for a ways, never finding any more blood. I was feeling very down at this point. I went back to where I had seen the last blood to start over. While standing there, trying to decide which way he might have gone, I saw him lying a few yards off.....DEAD! Now I was all happy again. He weighed 17 lbs, had a 9 1/2" beard, and about 1" spurs.
After getting him cleaned and in the freezer (and taking a nap - you have to do that sometimes when you get old), I went back out to another location where we had set up an older model Double Bull pop-up and had placed a 5 gallon feeder, filled with milo a few yards away. I set up two decoys this time, a hen and a jake, and settled in. When I went to set up my camera, I realized that I had left it on since that morning and the battery was just about dead. With no back-up battery with me, I opted not to try to use the camera.
I sat there for an hour or so, burning up in there, and decided to open up one of the windows to my back so I could catch what little breeze there was. I hadn't had the window open for 5 minutes when I saw a reallly nice gobbler coming in from behind me. I hadn't heard anything, just got lucky and saw him coming in. He got about 20 yards from the decoys and stopped, apparently studying them for a few minutes, then made a left turn and headed off. It was about 4:30 pm. After I was sure he wasn't coming back in, I got out and took down the decoys, thinking that he might come on in if he decided to return later. Nothing at all came through that area (not even a squirrel) and I was getting restless and felt like I was cooking inside that blind. Finally, about 6:30pm, I saw another good gobbler (I think it may have been the same one) coming in from the exact place the first one came from. Again I watched as he slowly made his way to the front of my blind. Without the decoys, he came in and started eating the milo. He was only about 10 yards in front of me and was facing away from me when I drew. He turned slightly and I released. The shot looked good and he took off, trying to run but looked more like a duck waddling away. I watched him as far as I could see him and I knew he was hurt bad. As soon as he got out of sight, I got out of the blind and went to look for my arrow. I hadn't seen it in the gobbler when he left, but didn't find it past where he had been standing either. I went to the area he had walked through and started seeing quite a bit of blood. I found my arrow along that route and it was covered in blood. I continued following the blood trail as I had that morning until it ran out. I walked about 15 or 20 more yards up the trail and, once again, heard some noise. I looked up to see my gobbler trying to run away. I didn't want to chase him, but stayed with him, moving slowly trying to keep him in sight. I lost sight of him after a bit and moved forward, slowly, looking for any sign of him. Again I heard something and saw him under some brush about 10 yards from me. He wasn't dead yet, but it was obvious that he wasn't going anywhere else. I put a follow-up shot into him to speed up the process. I was so excited. Two birds in one day! Even though I had the opportunity to "tag out" in one day, I was still happy with the results of the day. The second bird weighed 19 lbs, also had spurs that were about 1" long, and had an 11 1/2" beard which was really thick. He was my biggest bearded turkey ever.
I don't know if I'll ever have another turkey hunting day as exciting and active as that one, but I do know I'll always remember that one whenever I go out chasing those birds again.
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Old 06-14-2014, 09:24 PM   #10
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Good stories thanks for posting them
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Old 06-14-2014, 11:37 PM   #11
meangene1969
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2010 Longbow Weekend

  Ive traditionally been a recurve shooter. But I had a Horne Longbow built for me earlier this year for the Texas Longbow Shoot. I really enjoy shooting it but I have never taken an animal with a Longbow. I set out this weekend to get blood on my Longbow. I was very optimistic with the weather getting down into the 20's for lows but I didn't realize the wind was going to blow Mach 3.

  I got to one of my favorite blinds Saturday morning around 5:45am and got tied down as the wind was already howling. I sat till almost 12 pm and didn't see anything not even a corn stealing crow. I got out of the stand and went to the truck to refuel on water and some cheese and crackers. After resting for an hour and a half I decided to hunt another stand I have next to a old barn that has been on our place since my great great grandparents lived there in the late 1800s. I got in the double bull around 2pm and kicked back relaxing just trying to rest up from lack of sleep over the last couple of days. I was sitting their almost asleep when I heard the crunching of some hand thrown corn. I sat up and saw a little button buck and a doe fawn hard at work on the corn. The little button buck kept trying his best to keep her and the dove off the corn. As I was watching them a doe and a little 6 point buck came in and joined in the feast. Then after 30 minutes of them eating corn they all looked up and the 6 point bristled up until the bigger 8 point got nose to nose with him. It didn't take long for the six to give ground.

 By this time I had 2 does, 6 fawns, 6pt, and the 8pt all within 15 yards of me but I had already decided I wasn't going to shoot anything but a good buck, cull buck or a hog with my longbow. Well as I was watching the deer when all of the sudden a doe came running in like she was on fire and all the other deer spooked a little. She stopped at 18 yards and squatted, that's when I saw HIM walk into view. (I have game camera picks of this buck for the past two years and each year he has only produced a fork on his left side. He was one of the cull bucks I wanted.) The 4 x 2 walked up towards the doe, peeing all over his self and slightly quartered away from me. I came to full draw with the Longbow and picked a spot back on his ribs angling towards his off side shoulder and released the arrow. It was perfect! He immediately high kicked and started the death run with my arrow buried up the feathers. I heard him crash within seconds; I got out of the blind shaking to death and followed a blood trail that even I could stay on. I found the arrow about 10 yards from where I shot him and he was laying about 40 yards up the trail. He's not the best buck or even a trophy to most but being my first kill with a Longbow I couldn't be happier.

 Now with blood on my Longbow I went back to my favorite blind where I had sat the morning before and saw nothing. But I know hogs usually will hit this area in the morning. I got in the blind around 6 am with the wind STILL blowing hard and the temps hit the teens. As the sun began to break I had two does and two fawns crunching on corn and acting very nervous. They stayed for about 45 minutes then they left, I decided to set up my video camera in case I got a shot at something. I am a novice when it comes to videoing anything, much less trying to work the camera and hunt. I always forget to turn it on, zoom, hit record, etc etc etc. I sat back and stretched out to rest when I thought to myself look out one more time before you get settled. I looked out the window and there he was coming. I thought wow that hog is pretty big. It wasn't until he got to the corn that I realized how big he was. I quickly turned the camera on, got my bow up and ready then the shakes began. I steadied my bow and came to full draw with the boar at 12 yards; I picked a spot right behind the shoulder and released the arrow. It hit where I was looking and buried in half way up the shaft. The boar grunted loud and crow hopped a little, then he ran about 5 yards and fell, got back up and stumbled, fell again and let out a big death grunt about 10 yards from where I had shot him. I got it all on video! I was thrilled with my second Longbow kill. This is one of the biggest boars I've ever killed.


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Old 06-14-2014, 11:44 PM   #12
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2011 First Buck
 MY WIFE, I'M SO PROUD OF HER!!!! Well the story really starts last year when Tanya harvested her first ever animal; she took a very nice doe with her recurve. I sat with Tanya all last year so she could get the feel of what hunting was all about and give what little knowledge if have to her. We had a great 10 point buck come in last year but just as she came to full draw he bolted. I believe that buck has haunted her since that encounter. Tanya wanted so badly to take a buck but it just wasn't in the cards last year but that was Last Year.

 Now we move to this year, we had decided after all the hunting we did together last year and earlier this year that Tanya was ready to sit in the blind by herself and experience this hunting thing one on one. Well we went out on opening day and Tanya saw several does, young bucks, javis and turkey but nothing worth messing up her hunt for a buck. I saw several young bucks, does and javi. We communicated through out the hunt by text (isn't technology great) so I could make sure she felt comfortable. When we got back to the truck we discussed what we had all seen (Tanya, me and Creig) during the morning and evening hunts. I could tell Tanya was really enjoying seeing all of God's creations.

 The next morning we all got to our stands a little before 6am and waited for daylight. I was sitting in my blind watching some young bucks when they took off like they we're on fire. I heard something running towards my blind when all the sudden I had 8 coyotes pass by at mach 3. I finally got my heart rate back down when I received a text from Tanya at 8:10am stating she had just shot a nice 8 pt buck. I began texting questions back like how far, how big, when, where was your hit, etc. She tried to answer as well as she could but I could tell she was shook up. I told Tanya to stay in the blind and that I would be there around 9:30am and we would begin the search. I arrived at her blind around 9:45am and she got out and I gave her the biggest hug and kiss to congratulate her but she was ready to find her buck. Tanya stated she thought she heard a crash but she said she didn't know what a deer crashing sounded like. I told her you know it when you hear it. She showed me where the buck was standing when she shot him. The buck was about 18 yards from the blind. We immediately found blood (good blood), we followed the blood trail. We found Tanya's arrow about 20 yards from where she shot him. We walked about 10 yard farther and I saw a big white belly. I told Tanya come get your buck. She was almost in tears as we hugged and kissed. She walked up to her buck and was smiling ear to ear. As I looked at that buck I couldn't have been more proud, I have waited a long time to have someone in my life that enjoys this stuff as much as I do and what a blessing. She had harvested a great 8 pt buck. The buck has an inside spread of 16 inches. I inspected the shot and it couldn't have been better. The shot clipped the top of the heart and destroyed the lungs. The buck only went about 60 yards before he crashed. Tanya made a great shot with her Flanagan Recurve 44lbs@26". After Creig arrived and congratulated Tanya, we got the buck cleaned up and the pictures began. I am so thankful I got to experience another first for Tanya in her hunting career. Sorry for the long read but nothing in my hunting career has meant as much as her getting her buck.

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Old 06-15-2014, 02:15 PM   #13
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Good stories, thanks for posting
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Old 06-16-2014, 07:05 AM   #14
little john
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Cant wait to be able to get in on this
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Old 06-16-2014, 12:04 PM   #15
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tagged for later.
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Old 06-16-2014, 01:38 PM   #16
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This is a great idea, Mark!

Great stories everyone. I have one or two more, other than my bear hunt, I could add!

Bisch
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Old 06-16-2014, 01:43 PM   #17
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I like it.

With my hankering to learn the art of Trad shooting I'd buy it.
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Old 06-16-2014, 01:59 PM   #18
Loreva13
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Great stories! Keep them coming!
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Old 06-16-2014, 04:06 PM   #19
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One Of Those Days

It was in the mid 1990’s. I had only been back in traditional archery a short while. I was hunting down in North Carolina near The Devil’s Tramping Grounds (a tale for a dark stormy night). I had hunted Friday afternoon and taken a nice doe. I was shooting my Massie Longhorn longbow, 55 lbs at 28”. I was shooting Port Orford cedar shafts with a Magnus 160 grain 2-blade head

Saturday morning before daylight I hiked into a good spot where we had been seeing a lot of deer in an oak grove. We already had a 16 foot ladderstand set up so I crawled into it. I had not replaced the arrow I used Friday afternoon so I had 5 arrows in my quiver. At about 7:10 a nice doe came in. She was about 50 yards out when I first saw her and she was browsing her way toward me. I managed to stand up and get set for a shot. After about 10 minutes she turned broadside at about 18 yards. I picked a spot, came to anchor and released the string. The shot felt good, but my bottom limb ticked a tree limb I had not sufficiently trimmed and the arrow dove low, just creasing her across the bottom of her chest. Oh well, I still had 4 arrows.

About 5 minutes later another doe surprised me by showing up from the direction I was not expecting. She was only about 12 yards in an almost perfect broadside. I knew I couldn’t get away with much movement. I managed to turn slightly and since I regularly practice from a sitting position I felt confident in making the shot. I picked a spot and came to anchor and released the string. I watched as the arrow sailed harmlessly over her back. By now I’m getting a little flustered. But I still have 3 arrows.

I lean back in my seat and try to settle myself down. I figure that my morning is pretty well shot, but it’s a beautiful day to be in a tree. It’s nice and cool with a gentle breeze. I sat there and watched the squirrels busily gather acorns. About 15 minutes later I hear something off to my left. I slowly turn my head and see a nice 6 pointer about 40 yards out. I manage to stand without spooking him. After a few minutes of watching him crunch acorns he had worked into about 15 yards. He was slightly quartering away from me. Again I picked a spot and came to anchor. I released the string in what felt like a perfect shot. What the he**, the arrow sliced the air an inch or so over his withers. By now I’m experiencing a major meltdown. 2 arrows left!

I settle down in my seat and start reviewing the shots in my mind to see if I can determine what I’m doing wrong. I think on the last shot I didn’t bent at the waist. It’s still a few hours until I’m to meet my brother for lunch so I decide to stay in my tree. A few minutes later and I again hear something to my left. I slowly turn my head and see a doe in almost the exact spot where I had first spotted the 6-pointer a few minutes earlier. Again I manage to stand and get into position. She follows almost the exact trail that the buck had followed, but turned off when she was about 18 yards out. She stopped broadside and I got ready for a shot. I picked a spot, remembered to bend at the waist. I came to a good solid anchor and released the string only to have the arrow deflect off an unseen twig and pass harmlessly in front of the deer’s chest. Deer 4 – Phillip 0. Ok, now I have 1 arrow left.

At this point I’m seriously considering banging my head against the tree trunk and heading off in search of a stiff jolt of Jack Daniels. Instead, I decide I might as well spend the rest of the morning sitting in that tree. I put my 5th and final arrow on the string and lean back. Just a few minutes later I spot movement in the brush out in front of me. It’s another doe and she’s browsing toward me. She’s coming straight toward me so I’m afraid to try and stand up. She starts acting nervous and turns broadside at about 15 yards with her head behind a tree. I mentally review my shot process as I pick a spot and come to anchor. I release the string and watch as she runs off. She covers about 30 yards and I see her crash. I climb out of the tree and pick up all my arrows including the one that had just sliced through the doe’s heart.
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Old 06-16-2014, 04:49 PM   #20
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^^^^ Wow... talk about a story that will empty your quiver!!! What a mental battle right there.
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Old 06-16-2014, 05:08 PM   #21
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That's a good one Phillip!

I got a story that went just about like that only I was sitting in a tent blind missing turkeys instead of up a tree missing deer!

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Old 06-16-2014, 09:14 PM   #22
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EARLY BIRDS

The old heron stood on a small hump of clay that protruded a couple of feet out into the swift current of the Trinity River. He stood motionless, head cocked to one side and slightly bowed toward a small eddy pool created by the clay bar. I am sure he must have been aware of the 14 foot boat drifting past only a few yards away,yet he remained totally focused on the area of water within striking distance of his beak. Both instinct and experience told him his position was well chosen and that looking away for an instant could mean a missed opportunity at a fat gizzard shad or sand bass.

I smiled to myself at the similarities between the old bird and Sam, who stood next to me on the front of our boat. He stood motionless, bow slightly canted, and totally focused on the area of water within shooting distance of his Bear Kodiak Magnum recurve. Like the old bird, instinct and experience told him that to loose focus for even an instant could mean a missed opportunity at the monster alligator gar that we had seen the day before.

Knowing the spawn was fast aproaching,my brother-in-law, Sam Lovell and I had taken a quick scouting trip to a high bank over looking one of our favorite bowfishing spots in the murky waters of the river. As we walked through the thick cane along the bank , we could hear enormous splashes from at least 100 yards away. This was plenty to quicken our pace as we worked our way to the vantage point previously mentioned. Through binoculars, we could see a frenzy of action as several large fish broke the surface, sending spray at least ten feet into the air! Many of the fish seemed to be around six feet long but one was MUCH larger. She had claimed a stretch of river and was making certain that all knew she was boss by striking the surface with such force that it looked like hand grenades hitting the water. Within an hour we had cleared our schedules for the next day and made plans to be on the water by first light.

Now... as we drifted along with the current, the scene was much different. During the night, an unexpected cool front had passed through, dropping the late April temperature into the mid fifties. The steady blast of large gar from yesterday had changed to total silence as we drifted quickly toward the big gar's lair. Surely she was still around, yet there was no indication of any activity as the boat drifted silently through the thin layer of fog that hung just above the water.

With no warning the silence was broken as a huge head broke the surface ten yards in front of the boat! Everything played in slow motion as the beast surfaced, mouth half open and yellow eyes rolling to see who dared invade her territory. An arrow came to a quivering halt dead center of her back, followed an instant later by Sam's arrow as she rolled to my left. As is so often the case with instinctive shooting, I have no recollection of drawing, aiming, or shooting but the line streaming from my AMS retriever reel confirms the first arrow was mine.

The slow motion ends as the big fish charges past our boat and heads up river. I quickly pull the float loose from my bow just as the free end pulls through the slot and jerks it from my hand. I look at Sam just in time to see his float leave as well. There is no reason to be quiet anymore, Both floats are still headed up river and we are barely gaining with the 65lb thrust troller wide open. We babble back and forth at our great fortune to have two lines on a 200 plus pound fish! The fish made a wide arch across the river and turned down stream. We each grab a line and the boat picks up speed. The gar is now towing us faster than the troller could. Thirty minutes later, we have forgotten the early morning chill as sweat streams down our faces. There is no way to turn her when she heads directly into a submerged tree and gets a wrap around something solid. Sam and I both pull as hard as we can but cant budge it. Several tense minutes later, Sam suggests we try to pull it loose with the boat. After taking a few wraps around one of the cleats on the back of the boat, I start the 25hp Mercury and put it in gear. At three quarters throttle, something finally gave way. A large black log surfaced and the fish was moving once again. Seriously exhausted now, the fish surfaced for the first time since the shot. She looked even bigger than before! The mammoth fish swam slowly on the surface, still able to pull the boat. Sams arrow had somehow been shattered and we saw that only splinters were holding it. We knew we were pushing the 400lb line and fiberglass arrows beyond their function when the broken arrow gave way. With only one line on the fish now, i knew i had to turn her as she got a second wind and headed for another pile of logs. The line made an erie sound as it screeched through my gloved hands. "YOU ARE PUTTING TOO MUCH ON HER!" Sam yelled. She is tired, surely I can stop her. With a sudden "plop" I feel my arrow pull free and the line went slack.

Excitement turned to disappointment. It had been over an hour since we shot. Both our shirts were soaked through with sweat, and now the giant was gone. Throwing a rope around one of the logs, we both sat down on the edge of the shooting deck and silently started untangling our lines. I knew I had blown it and was waiting for Sam to say so when the giant fish surfaced slowly right beside us! I grabbed my bow but the lines were still a tangled mess. The tired fish took a big gulp of air and slowly submerged. As she slowly disappeared we could see a steady stream of bubbled escaping from my arrow hole in the top of her back. We hurriedly freed my arrow and untied the boat to follow a stream of bubbles. maybe she would do that again! The bubbles slowed but we were still able to keep track of the fish as she move close to a steep clay bank and stopped. After a few seconds the bubbles were slowing even more and she still hadnt surfaced. Sam suggested that I just shoot behind the bubbles. That would take a lucky guess as we had no idea how deep the fish was. Agreeing it was worth a try, I pulled the bow all the way back and let fly. I was disappointed to see that my arrow had stuck in the clay with only the knock visible and I couldnt pull it out to try again as the bubbles continued right in front of my arrow. Sam trolled over to the stuck arrow and I tried to pull it out. It was coming but had a strong suction in the clay. I reached down into the water with both hands and got a grip closer to the point so I could pull harder. As the arrow finally started coming, a huge head broke the water right in front of my face! I almost jumped out of the boat! My arrow wasnt stuck in the mud but was center in the gars spine a few inches behind her head!

I will never forget the trip back up the river with a fish that stuck out of the boat a foot on each side, or the content look on Sams face. I looked to the right as we pass the clay bar. The old bird is gone. I hope success came early for him as well.
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Old 06-16-2014, 09:21 PM   #23
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Great story GarGuy
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Old 06-16-2014, 09:26 PM   #24
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This was her
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Old 06-17-2014, 12:01 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chunky View Post
With all the great hunters and stories we have here, Bisch's recent bear hunt, any number of Buff's hunts, etc

We should put together a book of the best ones, a story or two from each contributer, and then self publish it like Buff did. I think that would be cool.

We would need someone to be the editor and organizer (not it!) and the population here to help pick which are the best ones.

Just an idea.
Chunky, when we were kicking around the Hall of Fame idea, this thread captures the heart of what l wanted to see: stories of great hunts by great hunters/ huntresses and fishermen/women. Keep 'em coming!
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Old 06-17-2014, 12:17 AM   #26
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Not we should do a book Chunky, we should do a series of books, One each year or so, and we can add more stories from the past year or previous years as needed
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Old 06-17-2014, 10:09 AM   #27
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It's funny how reading someone else's adventure brings to mind other adventures we've had ourselves which were similar. Like Bisch, I had a similar day to Phillip's with turkeys instead of deer (in addition to the one I posted above).
Great reads Phillip and Gar Guy. That is one HUGE fish!!!!
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Old 06-17-2014, 10:33 AM   #28
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I'm in for the 2nd edition
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Old 06-17-2014, 11:05 AM   #29
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I will play
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Cape Buffalo
. As long as I can remember I have dreamed of hunting a Cape Buffalo. 2 years ago Chunky convinced me to get it done. I booked a hunt with Dries Visser and began working on my equipment. I was blessed with a strong back and a weak mind so a heavy weight bow did scare me but I had fits getting an arrow that was stiff enough. I had Black Widow build me a 83# iron wood recurve and planned to use 200 grain GK heads. I have been shooting that bow for 2 years getting ready and the last couple of months I shot my sons 95# longbow, just to make my 83# bow seem lighter. I have been lucky that 95% of the time when I shoot at a animal my arrow hits right where I want but this Cape Buffalo had me spooked. I layed awake at night thinking about how terrible it would be if I made a bad shot. I knew they would not let me follow it up. I would be told to set in the truck while a couple of PH;s and 3 or 4 trackers risked their life cleaning up my mess. How would you deal with the shame if someone got killed because you made a poor hit? Once we arrived at camp it got even worst. The week before we arrived 2 fellows with Longbow had shot 13 animals and only recovered 1 .... Just 1. To make matters even worst the last Buffalo shot by a bowhunter, a compound had taken 4 days to track down and kill with a rifle. My friends in camp were trying to make me feel better but the more they talked about it the more I worried. The night before we climbed into the tree stands I stared at the ceiling all night, trying to convince myself I was ready. I had shot 10,000 arrows.... I was ready. When he whispered down to me that the buffaloes were coming I couldn't breathe I was so nervous. All the hours getting ready, All the time standing out in the Texas heat shooting my bow. It was all coming to a head. Once the buffalo were in sight, I zoned out, no longer nervous, I was BUFF, I could do this. There was a dozen or so buffalo moving down the hill but I was only interested in the one lone bull. He was a massive beast but still spooky. He finally hit the spot where I had dumped out a bucket of some kind of sweet powder to stop him. Auto pilot kicked in. I was no longer shooting at a buffalo. I was shooting at a rubbed spot about the size of your thumb, 2" in front of the crease of his shoulder. The PH is whispering "Wait ...Wait". I had 2 problems. Once you are at full draw with a 83# bow, you can't wait very long. The other was I knew it was time. I KNEW I was going to make a perfect shot, knew it in my soul. I never lost sight of the arrow as it leaped across the 15 yards and into the Buffalo.
It was by far the greatest moment of my bowhunting career. Not because he was a great animal, he was but because I didn't choke. If I had made a bad shot I really believe it would have haunted me the rest of my life, I had put that much pressure on myself.

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Old 06-17-2014, 11:05 AM   #30
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I was completely immersed in that gar story great job great fish
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Old 06-17-2014, 11:16 AM   #31
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Great story Buff, I wish I could pull enough bow to hunt Cape Buffalo.
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Old 06-17-2014, 01:14 PM   #32
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My First Javelina

It really started in 1998. I had been back in traditional archery a few years and was looking for a new longbow. Searching on the internet I ran across Jeff Massie in Shiner Texas. I liked the looks of his Longhorns and after talking to a few people ordered one. It was 64”, 55lbs at 28”. It had a cocobolo handle with Bamboo lams under clear glass. I received the bow and it shot as good as it looked. After I received the bow I stayed in touch with Jeff and he suggested I come down and hunt pigs and javvies with him. He was running pig and javvie hunts on the Cadena ranch near Benavides. Well, I wasn’t too sure of that as it was a long ways from Virginia to Texas. He finally convinced me and I talked my brother, Lewis, into going. We went down in January of 2000. We didn’t have much luck that year, but both of us took an eating size pig.

We had such a good time that we decided to go back the next year. This time we convinced my brother’s brother-in-law, Jesse, to go. We got down there the 3rd week in January on Sunday afternoon. It was 80 degrees and sunny. When we got up Monday morning it was in the 40’s and misting rain. It stayed that way through the week until Friday when it was in the high 70’s and sunny. We hadn’t had much luck, Jesse and Lewis had each taken a nice pig and a javvie. I had taken an eating size pig and a few rabbits.

On Friday morning I set up in a location called Canopy Road. I hand corned a stretch of the road and settled back to wait. After about half an hour I saw some javvies down near the end of the road. I faded back into the brush and stalked up on the javvie. When I finally got into shooting range, only one of the javvies was still on the road. It was a nice boar about 35lbs. He was quartering slightly away from me with his left side toward me at about 15 yards. I picked a spot and came to anchor and released the string on the first javvie I had ever shot at. The hit looked a bit too far forward for the angle he was at, probably only one lung. I watched him run into a mesquite thicket and settled down to wait a half-hour or so before I started to track.

While I was waiting, another Javvie, about 25 lbs wandered back onto the road. I slowly got to my feet and started a stalk. I stalked to about 20 yards. He started to get fidgety so I decided to shoot. I picked a spot, came to anchor and released the string. I watched as the arrow zipped through him in what looked like a perfect double lung hit. He darted toward the nastiest patch of cactus and mesquite on the ranch. He crashed just outside the thicket and I had my first javvie.

It was now time to track the first javvie. I picked up some good blood and followed it into the mesquite. I followed about 25 yards and had to crawl under some low hanging limbs. I crawled about 10 yards and I heard the javvie popping his teeth. I looked to my left and he was about 10 yards from me facing me. He looked pretty sick, but still very much alive. The overhanging limbs were so low that I couldn’t get off my hands and knees. It looked like a couple yards ahead I could get to my knees so I slowly crawled ahead. I got up on my knees and got ready to shoot. The limbs were too low for me to hold my bow upright so I shot with the bow almost horizontal. He was facing me but I could see his right shoulder. I picked a spot, drew, and released. The arrow sliced into him and it looked like I got one lung. He ran 5 or 6 yards and collapsed. I waited a few minutes and he didn’t move so I crawled up to him. He was dead.

This really hooked me on hunting pigs and javvie in Texas and I’ve been making an annual trip to south Texas ever since.

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Old 06-17-2014, 01:33 PM   #33
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Hunting javelina is a FUN hunt!

Bisch, you need to tell the story of the javelinas at the pit blind when you ran out of arrows.........
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Old 06-19-2014, 09:58 AM   #34
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Come on guys/gals. This is gonna be a really short "book" if we don't see some more stories. (I love reading these kinds of stories)
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Old 06-19-2014, 11:45 AM   #35
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Longbow Bison

This adventure started as many do, sitting around with good friends, sipping a bit of Jack Daniels. As I remember, it was a hot July evening. We were reminiscing about past hunts and someone mentioned that we should do something a little different. After tossing a few ideas around I suggested a Bison hunt. My hunting buddy David said he would be up for it. After a bit of discussion and research we decided we would do a cow hunt for the meat. I then started researching a location. Finally I hit on a location in North Dakota that seemed to offer what we wanted.

I talked to the outfitter and he recommended we come between December and early March as the hides would be prime. We decided to make the trip in December. It would be a three day hunt. Neither of us wanted mounts, but both of us wanted a nice buffalo robe. I decided that I would use my go-to bow, a 66” Jeff Massie 2 piece takedown Longhorn, 57 lbs at 28”. For arrows I would use Arrow Dynamics Trads tipped with 2 blade, 160 grain Magnus broadheads for a total arrow weight of 620 grains. My buddy opted to use his Black Widow recurve, 54 lbs at 28”. For arrows he used Grizzlystics tipped with a 2 blade,125gr Magnus Stinger for a total arrow weight of 600 grains.

We arrived at the ranch on December 6, met up with the outfitter, Orem, and got settled into the comfortable old ranch house. Orem took us for a quick tour to see the bison and where we would be hunting. It was wide open prairie with about 6,000 acres behind barbed wire. Orem said that the wire would not stop the bison if they decided to go somewhere. We went back to the house and settled down to rest up from the 2 day drive. Later, Orem picked us up and took us out to a local bar/café for dinner. We had a couple of drinks and ate some excellent T-bones while we planned strategy for the next day.
Next morning when we got up it was 19 degrees and there was about 6 inches of snow on the ground. We climbed into Orem’s pick-up and drove out to the pasture. We had decided we would start out by trying to stalk. This proved to be difficult as it was wide open prairie. There were some gullies and some trees along the watercourse, but the bison pretty much stayed away from them. By crawling and taking advantage of the low cover we were able to close the distance to about 50 yards, much too far to shoot with our trad equipment. We spent the morning trying stalks but were never able to close the distance.

After warming up with a hot lunch of chili, we discussed the afternoon hunt. Orem decided to put out some bales of hay and we would hide behind them to ambush the bison. We crouched behind the bales and waited for the bison to approach. The herd of approximately 200 finally came in and we were virtually surrounded. I examined the herd searching for a cow with a really good coat. Finally I spotted one that suited me, and waited for her to separate out from the herd enough that I could get a decent shot. Finally, she separated from her companions and turned almost broadside at about 20 yards, just slightly quartering away from me. I figured that if I held for the off shoulder I could slip an arrow through both lungs.

I picked my spot, came to full draw, hit my anchor, and dropped the string. I watched my arrow arc through the air and make contact just behind the rear rib, headed for the far shoulder. As she ran off I could see the arrow fetching protruding from her side. David was watching through binoculars and said it looked good, but penetration might be a little lacking. Then he said “She’s down”. She had made it about 100 yards before going down. When we walked up on her she was still breathing but couldn’t get up. I slipped another arrow into her and it was all over. We waited while Orem went to get the tractor and front end loader to load her onto the truck for the trip to the processor. She weighed about 900 lbs and I wound up with over 300 lbs of packaged, prime eating.

My penetration was a little less than I would have liked. I think this because she was somewhat quartering and the fact that I was using a 1 1/2” wide broadhead. I took out he near lung and was into the far lung. I think with a slightly narrower head I would have fully penetrated both lungs.
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Old 06-19-2014, 11:54 AM   #36
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Quote:
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Hunting javelina is a FUN hunt!

Bisch, you need to tell the story of the javelinas at the pit blind when you ran out of arrows.........
My first game animal with a bow was a Javi this past spring... hunting them is a blast!!! I can't wait for next year when I take my trad bow.
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Old 06-19-2014, 04:29 PM   #37
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Nice bison Phillip......on my bucket list for sure
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Old 06-19-2014, 06:28 PM   #38
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Are you looking for traditional only stories?
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Old 06-19-2014, 08:08 PM   #39
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Quote:
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Are you looking for traditional only stories?
I'll let Chunky answer this since he started the thread, but that is the way I interpreted it!

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Old 06-19-2014, 08:51 PM   #40
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Awesome stories guys! Phillip, that's an awesome bison!!
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Old 06-20-2014, 10:16 AM   #41
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Mark,
You started this yet you haven't blessed the campfire with any of your tales. You too, Bisch.
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Old 06-20-2014, 04:16 PM   #42
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Of course I will contribute, I would probably use my mule deer story for one, and pick one where I messed up for the other. People seem to like those, and luckily there are plenty of them.

I was kind of hoping that a person with good computer, grammar, and organizational skills would take the lead on the project.

All my ideas are not good.
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Old 06-20-2014, 04:59 PM   #43
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I just know you and Marty and Bisch have hunted more far-away places than most of the rest of us. I love hearing the tales and try to live those hunts vicariously through the stories.
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Old 06-20-2014, 07:11 PM   #44
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I'll let Chunky answer this since he started the thread, but that is the way I interpreted it!

Bisch
Guess I need a trad kill.
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Old 06-21-2014, 04:38 AM   #45
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Well this is an archery story, kinda. When I was about 22 I got hooked up with an old, old guy with a lot of experience who took me under his wing and taught me some stuff. He was 43ish.

RIGHT BEHIND THE SHOULDER

We we hunting in Sanderson Tx on a lease with Earl Bateman III. Norris, my buddy Joe and I were walking a long a ridge and spotted a javalina down in the bottom of a canyon. It was decided that Norris would stay on top and guide the two of us to the javy by hand signals. Well it did not take long for the animal to catch our scent and haul outta there.

As luck would have it the javalina headed straight up the hill about 150 yds straight to Norris. The javy paused for a second and Norris shot. The javy ran into a cave on a ledge with an opening barely large enough for it to enter.

I asked Norris if he made a good shot. Norris said "Perfect RIGHT BEHIND THE SHOULDER." Me being the smaller and most agile of the three of us crawled onto the ledge and peered into the cave. The javalina ran towards the opening popping it's teeth. Our faces were about 6" apart. I screamed. The javy screamed. I don't know about the javy but I might have peed a little wee bit.

I asked Norris again where he hit the javalina. "Pefect RIGHT BEHIND THE SHOULDER" he replied. We hung around for awhile and you could hear the animal in the cave and he was not happy. I said "Well its been 30 minutes and he is either really tough or you did not hit him RIGHT BEHIND THE SHOULDER". It was getting dark so we closed the opening with rocks so a predator would not enter the cave and drag off the soon to be dead javy which was hit RIGHT BEHIND THE SHOULDER.

We went back to camp. I fashioned a hook with an 8' handle out of an old branding iron and a piece of rebar. I also made a spear out of a survival knife and a piece of mequite limb, Rambo had just came out. Norris asked about the spear and the hook. I said "Next time I am looking into that hole I am going to be armed." He said "He is gonna be dead he is shot RIGHT BEHIND THE SHOULDER. I said "I'm not too sure about that." The hook was for if he was dead and did not run out of the cave we could reach in there and drap him out.

Well daylight found the three of us on top of the ridge. I removed the rocks. The javy charged the entrance. He screamed. I screamed and maybe peed a little wee bit. We had a quick meeting. It was decided that I would lay on my belly above the cave opening. I would stick the 8' hook into the hole and rattle it around in there to get the javy to exit the cave as we had stood guard for near an hour and all the javalina had done was hide and poop its teeth, a lot. Since it was Norris's javalina he was to take the shot standing over me as the javalina ran down the incline.

I rattled the hook in there. The javalina was very, very POed. All of a sudden I felt like I had a fish. I told Norris "I think I have hooked him around his ankle or something because I have him and he can't get it off." The hook was very dull and it would have been impossible to "gaff" him with it.

I was a whooping 135 lbs back then and found that I did not have the strenght to pull the javalina out while laying on my belly. Norris took over the hook and began to pull the javy out while laying on his belly.

I got down on the ledge and when the javy got near the opening I stabbed it with the spear RIGHT BEHIND THE SHOULDER. The javalina died instantly. After looking the animal over it was found that Norris's arrow had hit the javy right on top of the hips. The broadhead had not cut any meat and had cut a hole about 3" long through the hide. The hook which had only been rattled in the hole to scare the javalina had by an accidental miracle fell perfectly into this hole. Javalina hide is tough allowing Norris to pull it out of the hole.

We teased Norris abit about being old and not being able to see anymore as the javalina was clearly not hit RIGHT BEHIND THE SHOULDER.

Last edited by M.E.B.; 06-21-2014 at 04:47 AM..
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Old 06-21-2014, 05:36 AM   #46
C-beck
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My favorite thread
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Old 06-22-2014, 08:38 AM   #47
Texas5o
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Good story Mike.....Sounds like redneck ingenuity at it's best
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Old 06-22-2014, 09:11 AM   #48
Hoggslayer
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Great story's guys.
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Old 06-22-2014, 09:50 AM   #49
little john
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RBTS indeed greAt story
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Old 06-22-2014, 08:43 PM   #50
Phillip Fields
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Mike, good story.
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