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Old 09-12-2016, 11:15 AM   #1
SwampRabbit
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Default Advice for Trad Hunting Rookies

I have noticed this year that there are a lot of folks who are going to be hunting with trad equipment for the very first time come October. I think that is freaking awesome!!!!

I am by no means an expert when it comes to hunting with trad gear. I feel like I have only learned like 2% of what there is to learn. The majority of what I have learned, I have learned from the guys and gals on the trad forum and usually after making what I would consider "rookie" mistakes. Some things of course just have to be learned in the field... you have to see it, feel it, and watch yourself screw up before you can believe it.

I'm hoping this thread can kick start a few words of wisdom about HUNTING with trad gear... or advice that can help the incoming crop of rookie trad hunters. We spend alot of the offseason talking about form, tuning, 3D shoots, spinkled with a little bit of hunting advise... but lets talk about what it is like HUNTING with a trad bow. I can predict that some of the experts on here will be humble and say they are still learning themselves... but I tell you, it is worth listening as they have likely put more time in a stand with a stickbow than most of us have been driving a car.

I'll kick it off with a couple of things I learned right off the bat:

1) Deer duck and duck quickly... so it is advisable to learn how to aim low on them. I watched last year as my arrow was headed towards the "12" ring on a deer 15 yards away... only to watch her duck so hard that it just clipped her back. I had to see it to believe it. I had seen deer spin and such shooting with a compound... but my vanes had seemed to reach their target in time... Not so much with my recurve. I went out and had to buy a 3D deer target after that and learn how to aim and shoot for the arm pit... or at least where the leg meets the brisket. It wasn't until after I posted about my experience did I find out that some folks on here literally aim down the leg below the body!!!

2) 10 yards is CLOSE!!! I mean it is CLOSE! Okay, it isn't really that close, but boy does it feel CLOSE!!! I am a big fan of hand corning. I know that some folks don't dig the whole baiting thing... but if you hunt a feeder with existing sets... hand corning is going to be your friend in order to get those deer in CLOSE! I don't leave camp on my way out to a stand unless I got a small bag (ziplock or a small ditty bag) of corn with me to spread out about 10-15 yards in front of where I am sitting. Oh, and I remember looking at my son with a "WTH!" when he reached his hand into a bucket of corn to throw out. "You said it was HAND corn dad!!!" Well yes son... but you don't put your man smelling hands on the corn... it is figurative speech... Don't touch the corn Now I have seen Chunky throw out some corn in front of my stand once and had exotic does hanging out for nearly an hour 7 yards from me... while I don't think he was wearing gloves... I just assume not take the chance.

3) If you are a range finder hunter like me (I have depth perception issues) then it is a good idea to just use that thing to range your ring of death. Find spots on the ground that mark off your 15 yard circle (maybe longer or shorter) and then tuck that thing away. This allows you to not have to pick that thing up anytime something walks in.

4) Which brings me to my next point... shooting of out of a blind really can screw with your depth perception (even if you don't have any...) Small windows... only seeing parts of the landscape make animals look closer than they really are. Practice these if you can... but if you can't, bring a range finder, or take a hard look at the your setup from a different angle to see what those distances really look like. I will drop hand corn at 12 yards, sit down and think WHOA that has got to be like 12 feet away! No... it isn't... The reason I bring this up is because when folks go trad, they often times think that they don't need the range finder. Well you don't, but you need to mind your ranges no matter how you "find" them.

5) I should have said it the first... but WIND WIND WIND WIND... this is true for any hunting... just like most of the stuff up top but if you are going from compound bow hunting to trad hunting, you are cutting your distance in half or even more (depending on what kinds of shots you took with your compound.) I really really really like those chalk puff things... They really help you see where your scent is drifting off to.

6) Clearance and movement. You are carrying a bigger stick than you used to most likely. Swinging your bow around can get you busted pretty quick. In a ground blind, when I see deer coming in, I like to shift my bow from my lap, or off a hanging hook and rest my bottom limb on the ground and hold my bow out so that all I need to do when I am ready to take a shot is slowly lift my bow up and draw. Since I tend to draw up the leg, by the time I reach anchor, my bow hasn't had to move much at all. I don't know how the folks who shoot canted do it, but work out how you will sit for a couple of hours and get your bow into position to shoot without it looking like you are waving a flag around! CLEARANCE may be a problem now that you have doubled your limb length. Just be aware of it. A lot of my "need to build tall cattle panel" blind stuff came from the fact that a lot of our permanent box blinds didn't take into account that I'd need a roof just a tad higher than 6'

7) Have fun... have lots of fun! Enjoy the fact that you are hunting with trad equipment. Don't be afraid to fail. It can be really easy to get caught up in the pressure of the task... but just think about what it is you are doing and that not a lot of folks would dare to trade in a rifle... or their rest, peeps, and pins for just a stick and string. The more relaxed you are about it, the more confident you will be, and the more likely things will go your way. I'm not saying be overconfident. Definitely know your limits... but many others have gone before you and they have proven that it can be done, so don't stress about it.

I absolutely know I am missing alot of things... some things I am likely to repeat this season for sure. I know I'll second guess that I thew that corn to close or too far when I get into the blind and the sun comes up.
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Old 09-12-2016, 11:37 AM   #2
Buff
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Good info right there.

The one thing I would add is don't get all worked up before the shot.

If you spend a little time with the "Greats " among bow hunters, you will discover that the Chunky and Bisch's of the world are really nothing special.
They may be a little prettier than your average sportsman but taken as a whole they are just regular guys who kill a lot of stuff with Trad bows.

What makes them special is that they expect to kill, every time they head to the woods, every time they draw their bow they expect to kill what they are looking at.

Dont over think it, when the time is right. just draw your bow and kill the darn thing.
Afterwards you can get as excited as you want, I always do
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Old 09-12-2016, 11:47 AM   #3
Davidrubio
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not new but not an expert on trad hunting.

i limit my self to 15 yards ( im deadly accurate ) 20 yards lets just say my arrows magically move.

so i do hand corn but I strategically place my feeder and hand corn in a way that when i draw on a deer they wont see me. if the deer come really close is good but sometimes the only thing we have after an encounter like that is a big white flag running through the woods.

is it October yet ????????
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Old 09-12-2016, 11:52 AM   #4
Phillip Fields
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Swampie covered it pretty well. One thing I will emphasize is to PICK A SPOT, try to focus on an individual hair. Many times there will be a tuft of hair or a shadow or a crease where you want your arrow to go, use that for your aiming spot.

Above all, have fun!
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Old 09-12-2016, 12:08 PM   #5
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Good stuff here. Thanks for sharing.
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Old 09-12-2016, 01:09 PM   #6
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All good advice. I agree with the recommendation that you practice shooting from your blind/stand if possible. As he said, distances can look different when looking out small windows or through mesh, which in turn can affect all-important depth perception. Before the season starts I like to set a bag target in my shooting lanes at various distances. I then get in the blind and go through my pre-shot routine then shoot - just like it was a deer. You may discover some things you need to change. eg: clearance, stool height, etc. It is also a good confidence builder. (assuming you hit the bag)
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Old 09-12-2016, 02:26 PM   #7
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Great thread SwampRabbit! I'd say you hit most of the major things pretty well sir.

I'd definitely have to reiterate the point Phillip made about picking a spot. I know in the heat of the moment, that has always been one of the hardest things for me to do as I'm always worried about or thinking of other things to make sure all is right and this one just slips my mind and has cost me more than anything while hunting with trad gear. Picking THAT SPOT and focusing in clears the mind of everything and autopilot kicks in from there.

Buff is spot on as well. I still flip-flop weapons every now and then when the situation arises, but I'd say the biggest cause of that is not having that all out expectation of killing something every time I let go of the string on a critter. Once I broke down this barrier, it all changed for the better.

Good luck to all this upcoming season!
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Old 09-12-2016, 02:38 PM   #8
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The only thing I would add to all of this is:

1. Stay with cut on impact broadheads and learn how to sharpen them!( they will penetrate much better than anything else out there)

2. Practice like you hunt. ( If you are going to be hunting from an elevated position, then you should by all means practice from an elevated position! If possible, on 3D targets.

3. Make sure you practice with the same style and size broadheads that you will be shooting at the game animal!

4. I would suggest using feathers that you can see in flight. ( this allows you to know where your arrow hit, which will dictate how you will proceed with the recovery)
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Old 09-12-2016, 02:39 PM   #9
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Just about the time you start to think your gettin' it down, you've got a couple of kills under your belt--there'll be one animal to come along to re-humble you. Never get careless in your execution.
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Old 09-12-2016, 03:31 PM   #10
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Great write up.

I am a newbie here and I appreciate reading all of the tips from you guys.

I purchased some Zwickey 2 blade broadheads and would like to know any sharpening tips yall may have. I may should have went with another brand (magnus, etc) Thank you for your time.

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Old 09-12-2016, 03:47 PM   #11
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Awesome advice. Number one for me is don't get frustrated! Shot over my first one last season because he ducked it. Aimed low on the second and he never ducked at all. Missed under him. If I could just get them to tell me what they are gonna do it would be less stressful. There is nothing like the feeling of taking a deer with a trad bow. Can't wait for this season to start!
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Old 09-12-2016, 04:12 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdn79 View Post
Great write up.

I am a newbie here and I appreciate reading all of the tips from you guys.

I purchased some Zwickey 2 blade broadheads and would like to know any sharpening tips yall may have. I may should have went with another brand (magnus, etc) Thank you for your time.
I'll try to explain this as best as I can as I learned how to actually sharpen a zwickey this past spring.

Put the broadhead on your arrow.

Start off by holding the broadhead in your hand with the tip facing away from you.

Take a 12" or longer mill b-a-s-t-ard file (had to do that, the filter will get me) and file the edge parallel to it, not at 90 degree. Do this until you feel a burr along the entire edge. You will feel it when the file is actually making contact across the entire edge from back to point.

Spine the shaft and do the other side (point facing out)

When those two are done, you then have to do the other sides. You flip it so that the nock end of the arrow shaft is on top of you shoe/boot/foot and the arrow point is facing you. You then run the file down the edge again... again parallel to the edge.

I had never felt or seen a burr until I did it this way. You then take a ceramic or steel rod and work the burr off, leaving you with a razor sharp edge.


Before learning this way, I would sharpen sort of like how you sharpen a knife with a clamp and running up the edge 90 degrees to it. Problem is the edge gets concave really quick and it is hard to get those areas sharp.


I hope this makes sense. I am a picture/video kind of guy so....

Also, when I did sharpen it like a knife, I did kill critters... but it wasn't nearly as sharp as it could be.
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Old 09-12-2016, 06:41 PM   #13
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This is a good thread.
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Old 09-12-2016, 09:22 PM   #14
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This is a good thread.
Yup might need to be in the stickies

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Old 09-13-2016, 06:01 PM   #15
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I only have a few seasons under my belt but one of the first things i figured out is that when hunting in a tree stand i had to draw slowly. The deer where i was hunting had a lot of pressure and were very jumpy. I got busted trying to draw 3 times before i learned my lesson. I now practice a slow draw

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Old 09-13-2016, 07:10 PM   #16
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Great tips above, most of the first things I thought of have been well covered.

I think it is very important for all bowhunters, but especially for trad hunters to learn to read deer body language. It took me much longer than it should have to figure this out. If I had a deer broadside or quartering and within I thought I was good to go....but we know this is not true. A hot wired deer ready to bust is NOT a good shot.

One thing all the regulars here have heard me say a thousand times...I would rather miss low, than to hit high.
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Old 09-13-2016, 07:11 PM   #17
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Amen Chunky!
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Old 09-14-2016, 08:21 AM   #18
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Sun at your back and wind in your face when ever possible.

Use fertilizer stakes in the spring around your favorite oak tree in hunting area.

Mock scrapes with tarsal glands in pre-rut/ early rut.

Use razor sharp broadheads.

Never push a shot on an WIRED deer (X2 Chunky).

Good luck and have fun!!!

X2 on STICKEY
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Old 09-14-2016, 09:02 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caughtandhobble View Post

Use fertilizer stakes in the spring around your favorite oak tree in hunting area.
Ok, curiosity got me. Why do you put fertilizer stakes around the Oak tree? (This feels like a set up fro a bad joke.)
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Old 09-14-2016, 09:08 AM   #20
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Ok, curiosity got me. Why do you put fertilizer stakes around the Oak tree? (This feels like a set up fro a bad joke.)
Acorns acorns acorns acorns!

If you only hunt feeders or rely only on corn/bait to bring your deer in to you, you absolutely hate acorns. If you hunt off the feeder... acorns are you friend.

Any time I visit the lease, or somebody else has, I am looking for or asking for a report on the acorn crop. Nothing messes with the deer pattern more than acorns starting to fall.

Just to add to this... when I drive through the gate come opening weekend (and every weekend afterwards) the first thing I look for driving down the dirt road are whether or not the 3-4 oaks that are on the way to camp have dropped acorns on the ground. If I see those green little buggers laying on the ground, I adjust my expectations for feeder activity and may or may not adjust how I hunt that weekend.

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Old 09-14-2016, 09:09 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caughtandhobble View Post

Mock scrapes with tarsal glands in pre-rut/ early rut.
You and I need to have a conversation about this one... pretty gosh darn quick as October is almost here and I am all about hunting off feeder more this year.
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Old 09-14-2016, 09:14 AM   #22
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Once on a heavy acorn year, the corn was growing plants under our feeders. I told my oldest daughter DJ about 12 at that time, that it was going to be a slow year.

She looked and me and said, "I know Dad, we are throwing cookies at em, and they already have pie!"

I love that line.
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Old 09-14-2016, 09:36 AM   #23
Phillip Fields
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I love it when we have a good acorn year. I love to set-up in or near a good oak tree.
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Old 09-14-2016, 09:40 AM   #24
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Great idea for this thread Scott the only thing that I have to add is when you make a rookie mistake you feel it big time I had spent so much time preparing myself to hunt with Sacagawea hours and hours and hours shooting that I completely forgot how to shoot my personal bow so when I went to prequalify to hunt on this lease that I'm going to get to hunt on I completely dropped the ball I was physically and emotionally and mentally ill do not shoot more than one bow immediately prior to hunting season pick one bow and stick with it it's too easy to shoot multiple bows this is something that you must do as a rookie to find out what you like but once you find something that you shoot well stick with it until after the season is over
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Old 09-14-2016, 11:42 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Junkers88 View Post
Ok, curiosity got me. Why do you put fertilizer stakes around the Oak tree? (This feels like a set up fro a bad joke.)
The fertilized Oak tree is a win win... Even if there is a good crop of acorns the fertilized tree will be the go-to tree for the deer. If the acorn crop is less than desirable the fertilized tree will have a little more to offer. I have hunted in Oak groves a bunch and I have seen this little trick work year after year.
Quote:
Originally Posted by SwampRabbit View Post
You and I need to have a conversation about this one... pretty gosh darn quick as October is almost here and I am all about hunting off feeder more this year.
The mock scrapes work well in pre-rut/ early rut when placed in the usual scrape locations, such as old trails, pipelines, edge of open areas, so on. I always wear rubber boots and rubber gloves and take a limb and make a scrape under a low lying limb. I take the Tarsal Gland and make a slit in it and use a plastic tie wrap and securely hang it above the scrape. I do pour some dominant buck lure in the scrape. I have had very good results using this method, don't be surprised if this becomes a regular scrape.

I always hunt the mock scrape the same day and following day that it is made. Don't shoot the first buck that shows up, the usually get bigger as the day progresses. The bucks that come in are mostly curious who the new fellow is or come in just plain ****** off, I have never had a buck come in nervous.

The great thing about using this method is that you can set-up with the wind right and insure that you can get good cover for your blind. I never use the mock scrapes at an old stand or established stand.

I am sure I forgot something, if you all have any questions just let me know. Good Luck Everyone!!!
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Old 09-14-2016, 01:42 PM   #26
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Thanks for the info Ben!
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Old 09-14-2016, 02:00 PM   #27
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The weather is warm in October... but it starts to chill off pretty quick and might be rainy. Also worth the mention is how to handle the elements when it comes to hunting with trad equipment. I'll admit, I still haven't worked out most of the kinks myself but here are some considerations:

1) Rain. Getting wet stinks, no doubt about it. But I still like hunting in the rain. I have noticed that deer tend to move between showers. My first deer with trad last year came on a morning where I was walking to my stand in the dark during a thunderstorm. After I got situated, it poured hard for quite some time. But when it stopped and the clouds thinned out just enough, a deer appeared eating my hand corn. So just because it is raining doesn't mean the hunting is going to be always terrible. But.... rain and fletchings don't mix. While you should be able to shot a field point with fletchings that are laying down flat due to rain... shooting a broadhead is a different matter. You need to consider how you will protect your fletchings. Some folks spary scotch guard, some use a specialized spray, some cover, etc. Hoping some folks come back on here and offer up their advise. For now, I just rubberband sandwich bags over my fletchings for when I am walking from camp to a covered ground blind.

2) Cold. Cold is good... in some places deer move better in the cold. But with cold comes more clothes. Adding layers to your face and hands and arms and such can make pulling of your shot a bit of a challenge if you don't think it through ahead of time. If you can, practice shooting in your clothes and tweak whatever needs tweaking. I have tweaked my setup over the years to the following. I wear an armguard to keep my puffy sweater or jacket out of the way of the string on my bow arm. Some folks don't wear an armguard all the time... this is a good time to do so. I don't wear gloves because I like to have my bare hand on the grip and I wear a tab so I need my fingers exposed when pulling on the string. In these cases I usually wear a muff with hand warmers or use my sweater muff, or jacket pockets with hand warmers in them. For my face, instead of wearing a face mask, I wear two buffs, or a buff and a beanie. Basically the idea is I can pull down the lower part to expose my face so I can get skin to skin contact at anchor. Note that I still then put paint/charcoal on my nose and cheeks so that when I slip down the bottom, my white skin doesn't "flag" this is one advantage of sporting a beard... not much to cover up with paint, etc.
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Old 09-15-2016, 04:07 PM   #28
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Great thread. I am not only new to trad but new to hunting. Started four years ago and still have only killed rabbits and one pig. I love sitting in the stand though I can sit for hours. Just being out there is great. I am actually glad I haven't killed a deer yet. Hoping to do so with my trad bow. Sure wish I would have started as a young man but wow I love it.


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Old 09-16-2016, 01:57 PM   #29
Randy Madden
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I gotta respectfully disagree with Buff! Bisch is not that pretty!! ( I don't know Chunky)
But the man can sure put some critters on the ground! And is funny as heck when he gets all worked up telling stories!
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Old 09-16-2016, 04:20 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SwampRabbit View Post
The weather is warm in October... but it starts to chill off pretty quick and might be rainy. Also worth the mention is how to handle the elements when it comes to hunting with trad equipment. I'll admit, I still haven't worked out most of the kinks myself but here are some considerations:

1) Rain. Getting wet stinks, no doubt about it. But I still like hunting in the rain. I have noticed that deer tend to move between showers. My first deer with trad last year came on a morning where I was walking to my stand in the dark during a thunderstorm. After I got situated, it poured hard for quite some time. But when it stopped and the clouds thinned out just enough, a deer appeared eating my hand corn. So just because it is raining doesn't mean the hunting is going to be always terrible. But.... rain and fletchings don't mix. While you should be able to shot a field point with fletchings that are laying down flat due to rain... shooting a broadhead is a different matter. You need to consider how you will protect your fletchings. Some folks spary scotch guard, some use a specialized spray, some cover, etc. Hoping some folks come back on here and offer up their advise. For now, I just rubberband sandwich bags over my fletchings for when I am walking from camp to a covered ground blind.

2) Cold. Cold is good... in some places deer move better in the cold. But with cold comes more clothes. Adding layers to your face and hands and arms and such can make pulling of your shot a bit of a challenge if you don't think it through ahead of time. If you can, practice shooting in your clothes and tweak whatever needs tweaking. I have tweaked my setup over the years to the following. I wear an armguard to keep my puffy sweater or jacket out of the way of the string on my bow arm. Some folks don't wear an armguard all the time... this is a good time to do so. I don't wear gloves because I like to have my bare hand on the grip and I wear a tab so I need my fingers exposed when pulling on the string. In these cases I usually wear a muff with hand warmers or use my sweater muff, or jacket pockets with hand warmers in them. For my face, instead of wearing a face mask, I wear two buffs, or a buff and a beanie. Basically the idea is I can pull down the lower part to expose my face so I can get skin to skin contact at anchor. Note that I still then put paint/charcoal on my nose and cheeks so that when I slip down the bottom, my white skin doesn't "flag" this is one advantage of sporting a beard... not much to cover up with paint, etc.
Do I need to worry about the rain damaging the bow?
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Old 09-16-2016, 04:51 PM   #31
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Do I need to worry about the rain damaging the bow?
Not so much the bow, but wool string silencers will get heavy and affect your bows tune. Feathers will also be affected by the rain.

Don't expect to get something everytime. But know that whatever you draw on will die. That confidence can be the difference between a good shot and. a bit si good one.
I've had deer within feet of me many times, but have yet to get one. Chalk it up as a learning experience and keep at it.
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Old 09-16-2016, 04:55 PM   #32
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Do I need to worry about the rain damaging the bow?
Not really.

Most bows have a coating that protects any wood that it is made from. You just wipe off or let those surfaces air dry. If you do have any large nicks in your riser, you can lightly sand and dab some super glue over it.

If you have a takedown bow, it is a good idea after it gets wet to go ahead and take it down, and dry and spots that water could have reached. When my widow got soaked in the rain, I kept shooting, etc. When I got home, I took it down and wiped any moisture that got in between the limbs and the riser.

That is about it. I shot one of my best 3D rounds the month prior in a pouring rain. Feathers were flat so I was practically shooting "bareshaft." The string is waxed so no concerns over moisture there.

Which reminds me one other thing... I always keep my quiver full of broadhead tipped arrows. After that rain, I didn't take out the arrows and wipe them down. They formed a bit of rust on the exposed edge that I had to touch up. I think I have read that some guys put Vaseline or some coating on their broadheads to prevent rust... but I haven't tried that yet. I just need to remember the next time to pull those out and wipe them off.
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Old 09-16-2016, 04:59 PM   #33
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awesome stuff here in
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Old 09-18-2016, 10:39 AM   #34
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Great thread!

I have found that I can "wire" a deer up by looking at it. They see the predatory eyes and it gets them jazzed and ready to bolt. I avert my eyes and use my periphery if in the open or play peekyboo behind my cover...tree, shrub, rock, etc. I wait until the tail goes down or swishes and the head does too and feeding or frolicing commences before I move. I feel like Wile E Coyote looking at the Roadrunner...they know the Acme jetpack rollerskates are coming. ( I might not have this problem if I hunted in a manufactured blind or popup blind.)

I am a trad rookie...and I cant wait to get busted...or hopefully not.

Last edited by Briar Friar; 09-18-2016 at 10:43 AM.. Reason: BustedSpake
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Old 09-18-2016, 10:49 AM   #35
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I'm heading to the shop tomorrow to get my old recurve ready to go. I've never killed any big game with traditional equipment but the deer and pigs on our place are pretty accommodating so if I can get decent at 15 yards in the next few weeks I may have a chance. I do fairly well with the arrows for my compound at ten yards right now. Hopefully with proper arrows I can zero in a little better at longer ranges. I just hope I do well enough to talk myself into a nicer bow.
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Old 09-18-2016, 10:54 AM   #36
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And btw, Buff is pretty bad azz shooting a traditional bow. Watching him whiz arrows down range hitting three d animals dead in the vitals out to 40+ yards really has kicked me in the butt to get it done this year. At 52 yo there is not enough next years left to keep letting laziness and self doubt keep me from fulfilling the dream.
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Old 09-18-2016, 11:08 AM   #37
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And btw, Buff is pretty bad azz shooting a traditional bow. Watching him whiz arrows down range hitting three d animals dead in the vitals out to 40+ yards really has kicked me in the butt to get it done this year. At 52 yo there is not enough next years left to keep letting laziness and self doubt keep me from fulfilling the dream.
Welcome to the addiction. If you stick with it, the day you get your first trad kill, you will kick yourself in the butt for putting it off so long!

And yes, Buff is pretty bad azz with a trad bow!

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Old 09-18-2016, 11:22 AM   #38
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I know it has only been mentioned a few times;

Practice like you hunt!!!

Don't let your hunting jacket surprise you when your string hits it and your arrow is 5' short of the target.

For Heaven's sake don't shoot your broadheads the first time, on your first hunt.

Pick a spot on your target, don't aim for a whole deer. I know this is an old cliché but it is more important shooting a traditional bow than ever before.

Good Luck this Season
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Old 09-18-2016, 11:25 AM   #39
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Good info in here
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Old 09-20-2016, 05:42 PM   #40
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Well I have new arrows, new shelf pad, string set up and ready to shoot. Now let's see if I still can at least keep it on the bag.
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Old 09-07-2017, 12:25 PM   #41
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'Bout that time again.

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Old 09-07-2017, 03:33 PM   #42
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I'll offer this advice. If you're a former compound shooter don't let your past success and confidence it that equipment influence your decisions with trad equipment. Stand placement, elevation, angle, range, everything. Because the longer bow, angle of string to limb ends, limb ends and tree limbs and everything else has changed. Assume nothing and reprepare for everything.

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Old 09-07-2017, 07:41 PM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DRT View Post
I'll offer this advice. If you're a former compound shooter don't let your past success and confidence it that equipment influence your decisions with trad equipment. Stand placement, elevation, angle, range, everything. Because the longer bow, angle of string to limb ends, limb ends and tree limbs and everything else has changed. Assume nothing and reprepare for everything.

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Not to mention the extreme difference in arrow arch. Great advice DRT.
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Old 09-08-2017, 10:10 AM   #44
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I have decided to put my compound away this year and only use my recurve.

I've never killed anything with trad equipment so this will be an experience.
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Old 09-08-2017, 10:50 AM   #45
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SwampRabbit, very good post especially on points 1 and 6.

Deer will drop when you shoot many times. When I first started shooting a bow my mentor told me to aim like you were going to shave the bottom of the deer's chest cavity. I was not a true believer and shot over the first two deer I shot at from elevated stands. I read a post a few days ago in which a couple of guys insisted that a deer would never drop.

Always take your bow into the stand you are going to hunt from well below the season, especially if you previously shot compounds. Make sure you have clearance for your bow limbs as well as trimming any limbs in a tree you may be hunting from. Don't trim too much of a tree as you still want and need cover but the last thing you need is having a bow limb hang up on a tree limb or small branch as you try to draw on a deer.
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Old 09-08-2017, 12:30 PM   #46
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Good stuff!!!!
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Old 09-08-2017, 01:50 PM   #47
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If you plan to shoot from a sitting position you need to practice shooting from a chair.

I practice from the exact same style of chair that are in my blinds.


Whenever I set up a ground blind I take a piece of PVC that I have cut a little longer than my recurve to make sure I have plenty of clearance in my blinds. I even labelled the grip with a sharpie so I can emulate a hunting situation.


I think people make mistakes when they are hunting with blinds arent setup the way they are use to shooting.

For example: if you typically hold you bow in a vertical position while shooting/practicing and then are forced to cant due to clearance issues, it will affect your shot. JMO
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Old 09-08-2017, 07:32 PM   #48
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I will add another piece of advice.

Don't discount others advice because you think you know it all already. Leave your ego at home. You will be humbled one way or another.

I attribute my success to the folks on here that provided advice. It definately is the monkey behind the string, but I like to think this monkey paid attention when he was being schooled. Did I question things... sure, but it was to learn more about it... not because I needed to prove a point or make myself look smart. So definately ask questions.

So, listen when folks who are proven killers speak. It is not hard to know who they are on here. There are a ton of them. If you pay attention and take it to heart... you too will lose count of how many critters you've killed with a stick bow.

Edit: and to be clear... I am not one of those guys... I can still recite from memory when, where, and how many critters I have killed with a stickbow

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Last edited by SwampRabbit; 09-08-2017 at 07:38 PM..
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Old 09-08-2017, 07:34 PM   #49
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I'm at one. If I lose count there I'm in trouble.

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Old 09-08-2017, 08:15 PM   #50
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Great advice from all!!!! Season is sneaking up quickly!
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