Reply
Go Back   TexasBowhunter.com Community Discussion Forums > Topics > Around the Campfire
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-10-2016, 09:16 PM   #1
txfireguy2003
Pope & Young
 
txfireguy2003's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Temple
Hunt In: Burnet Co.
Default Want to learn machining

If you wanted to learn to run a manual lathe and/or mill, but didn't own either (yet) and didn't want to take a job in a machine shop, how would you go about it?

I want to purchase a lathe, or possibly lathe/mill combo to do some hobby gunsmith work and Form 1 suppressors, maybe even make it a side business after I've got some machine time under my belt (and an FFL of course). My concern is that I don't want to spend thousands on a machine that I don't know how to run, so I thought I'd try and get a crash course first.
txfireguy2003 is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-10-2016, 09:28 PM   #2
hellbndr23
Ten Point
 
hellbndr23's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Katy TX
Hunt In: Huntsville TX
Default

Maybe try looking for a "maker space" near you. Like gym membership but they have equipment like welders, lathes, paint supplies etc. They are all different.
hellbndr23 is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-10-2016, 09:37 PM   #3
COOLDAD1
Ten Point
 
COOLDAD1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Aledo, TX
Hunt In: Texas
Default

If you were closer I would teach you. I'm a machine shop supervisor, but your a little to far. You could learn the basics in a couple of weeks.
COOLDAD1 is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-10-2016, 09:38 PM   #4
GrapeApe
Eight Point
 
GrapeApe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Hunt In: Big Sandy Unit, SHNF
Default

Start with Southbend's "How to Run a Lathe" Pretty good basic book and cheap. I learned by just getting in there and making stuff. Aluminum and Delrin are cheap and easy on tools.

I got into it for the same reason as you. Now I have a healthy side business of friends of friends who need things fixed or modified. In the beginning it was for the cost of materials and a case of beer, now its cash on delivery.

I've upgraded from a Grizzly benchtop mill and lathe to a Pacemaker that was on a ship in WW2 along with a couple of Haas machines now.

Still though, I spent a lot of time just putzing around making bottle openers, keychains, pens, knives and knife parts, lots of jeep accessories and camping gear.

I spent a few months sweeping the floor of my local real machine shop for free to get an in with a mentor. The only thing I learned there was how not to manage a business and how to sweep like a bad*ss.

YouTube has some really good tutorials now also, check out: MrPete222, Abom79, Tom's Techniques, OXToolCo, DoubleBoost, NYC CNC, Tactical Keychains, Keith Fenner
GrapeApe is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-10-2016, 09:40 PM   #5
wsteffen
Ten Point
 
wsteffen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Humble, TX
Hunt In: Jewitt, TX or any where else I can find to go
Default

Check with any area community colleges. They probably have some courses and if you are lucky they will be continuing ed classes that are a lot cheaper.
wsteffen is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-10-2016, 10:14 PM   #6
txfireguy2003
Pope & Young
 
txfireguy2003's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Temple
Hunt In: Burnet Co.
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hellbndr23 View Post
Maybe try looking for a "maker space" near you. Like gym membership but they have equipment like welders, lathes, paint supplies etc. They are all different.
Never heard of such a thing. Where would a guy go to look for this type of space?
txfireguy2003 is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-10-2016, 10:16 PM   #7
txfireguy2003
Pope & Young
 
txfireguy2003's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Temple
Hunt In: Burnet Co.
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GrapeApe View Post
Start with Southbend's "How to Run a Lathe" Pretty good basic book and cheap. I learned by just getting in there and making stuff. Aluminum and Delrin are cheap and easy on tools.

I got into it for the same reason as you. Now I have a healthy side business of friends of friends who need things fixed or modified. In the beginning it was for the cost of materials and a case of beer, now its cash on delivery.

I've upgraded from a Grizzly benchtop mill and lathe to a Pacemaker that was on a ship in WW2 along with a couple of Haas machines now.

Still though, I spent a lot of time just putzing around making bottle openers, keychains, pens, knives and knife parts, lots of jeep accessories and camping gear.

I spent a few months sweeping the floor of my local real machine shop for free to get an in with a mentor. The only thing I learned there was how not to manage a business and how to sweep like a bad*ss.

YouTube has some really good tutorials now also, check out: MrPete222, Abom79, Tom's Techniques, OXToolCo, DoubleBoost, NYC CNC, Tactical Keychains, Keith Fenner
This is probably what I'll end up doing, just buy a machine, watch YouTube videos (which I've already done a lot of) and figure it out. My problem is that I want to be able to fit barrels on bolt actions, so that requires a fairly large lathe, and it's quite an investment to just jump right in without any training.
txfireguy2003 is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-10-2016, 10:26 PM   #8
Tower43
Eight Point
 
Tower43's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Austin
Default

I think I am about at the same point you are with my gun hobby. I had a cheap mill in mind and a bunch of practice on cheap stuff. And a lot of YouTube
Tower43 is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-10-2016, 10:44 PM   #9
NewTexian
Eight Point
 
NewTexian's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: League City
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hellbndr23 View Post
Maybe try looking for a "maker space" near you. Like gym membership but they have equipment like welders, lathes, paint supplies etc. They are all different.
Thank you for this. I too never heard of this place. Im would like to learn how to weld but do not want to pay the college $1000 for a hobby.
NewTexian is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-10-2016, 10:49 PM   #10
doublearrow
Ten Point
 
doublearrow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Midland, Texas
Default

I have mills, lathes, pantograph mills in my knife shop that ingot before I had any knowledge of what I'm doing. . I used forums, YouTube, and screwing up stuff to teach myself. I tried finding a night college course or someone who operated manual machines that had time to teach but never lucked out.
doublearrow is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-10-2016, 11:07 PM   #11
planomustang
Ten Point
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Plano
Hunt In: Wise/Montague County Line
Default

Sorry, I thought this thread was about "machine learning", rather than "learning to machine". Unfortunately, the convergence is coming.
planomustang is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-11-2016, 06:02 AM   #12
Goldeneagle
Pope & Young
 
Goldeneagle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Allen, TX
Hunt In: Where ever I get a chance.
Default

Most of the CC's only teach CNC. Manual machining is starting to become a lost art. I've been machining for a living for 40yrs. My father was a machinist and I learned manual lathes when I was 12yrs old. The HS's used to have trade classes, but that went away long ago. Plano had a machining class. I wish you were closer, I would be willing to teach you.
Goldeneagle is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-11-2016, 06:27 AM   #13
alec73065
Ten Point
 
alec73065's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Georgetown
Hunt In: Junction & Lampasas
Default

I know in Round Rock next to the Lowes at LaFrontera there is a place called techshop that lets you come in and buy machine time. Looks like they offer classes as well. I always mean to stop in there but never have time. You could buy my machine shop in the classifieds and I could spend some time with you I just have a garage shop but have everything you would need. I simply don't have time to use them anymore , I started traveling a lot for work. Robert


techshop.ws/austin_round_rock.html
alec73065 is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-11-2016, 06:39 AM   #14
Bowtech38
Pope & Young
 
Bowtech38's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Belton
Default

Could try Titan machine on adams ave they may beable to help you out as far as some classes or to just ask questions.
Bowtech38 is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-11-2016, 06:41 AM   #15
miket
Pope & Young
 
miket's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Plantersville
Hunt In: Grimes County, Victoria
Default

If you decide to buy some machines this is a good time. Lots of machines for sale down here in the Houston area right now. Most are CNC but with manuals mixed in. Shops closing down and laying off.....
miket is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-11-2016, 06:44 AM   #16
miket
Pope & Young
 
miket's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Plantersville
Hunt In: Grimes County, Victoria
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by alec73065 View Post
I know in Round Rock next to the Lowes at LaFrontera there is a place called techshop that lets you come in and buy machine time. Looks like they offer classes as well. I always mean to stop in there but never have time. You could buy my machine shop in the classifieds and I could spend some time with you I just have a garage shop but have everything you would need. I simply don't have time to use them anymore , I started traveling a lot for work. Robert


techshop.ws/austin_round_rock.html
I was wondering if you had sold it. I was seriously considering it but since oil crashed I havent had the cash. I havent had a job in my shop since Nov ( not counting my product )
miket is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-11-2016, 06:55 AM   #17
berettadave
Ten Point
 
berettadave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Killeen, Tx
Hunt In: In vain
Default

There's a place in Round Rock called Tech shop. There is a monthly fee. They have classes on how to run some of the equipment.

Dave
berettadave is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-11-2016, 07:15 AM   #18
kmitchl
Ten Point
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Montgomery, TX
Hunt In: Edwards Co
Default

I was in the same boat 20 years ago. Buy a machine and get started making chips. Bought a used Craftsman lathe off the classifieds for starters. I was fortunate to have a local metal shop club where I could ask questions of more experienced guys and get expert advice. The internet now makes that level of access available everywhere. Over the years I have traded up, always selling what I had and buying a little better. You don't need a $10,000 machine to get started. Right now in Houston there are a lot of shops selling off surplus equipment to pay the bills and keep going.

If you want to chamber rifle barrels the Grizzly gun smithing lathes are well thought of. I've owned a few Chinese machines. Can get the job done just not as well finished as some of the name brand machines. There are as many ways to cut chambers as there are gun smiths but I like chambering through the headstock so look for machines with at least 1-1/2" bore through the headstock and short enough for a barrel to stick out both ends. Can be done with longer spindle lathes but requires a little creativity and fixtures. The lathe/mill combo machines are generally considered to be junk. Whatever you spend on a machine plan to spend a like amount on tooling and measuring tools. Don't be afraid of a 220 three phase machine if you have 220 single phase in your shop. There are a number of ways to run three phase machines from single phase. Jump in and get started. You will remember the lessons from your failures much better than your successes. Contact me if I can help.
kmitchl is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-11-2016, 07:34 AM   #19
GrapeApe
Eight Point
 
GrapeApe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Hunt In: Big Sandy Unit, SHNF
Default

kmitchl has a great point! Don't push larger machines off the board, 3phase big voltage machines are often available super cheap or even free if you're willing to move them. A VFD or Rotary Phase Converter can power them easily. I know of several people who have been given perfectly good machines for nothing just because people didn't want to deal with the power issue.
GrapeApe is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-11-2016, 09:48 AM   #20
TxMachinist
Eight Point
 
TxMachinist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Lewisville
Hunt In: Hardeman County
Default

You can always practice on plastic before you go to cutting the real thing. It is fairly common practice. You can use aluminum also. Buy a Machinist Handbook and join Practical Machinist. It's a forum for machinists to help each other. If you can find a class it is well worth it. Good Luck!
TxMachinist is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-11-2016, 10:36 AM   #21
miket
Pope & Young
 
miket's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Plantersville
Hunt In: Grimes County, Victoria
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TxMachinist View Post
You can always practice on plastic before you go to cutting the real thing. It is fairly common practice. You can use aluminum also. Buy a Machinist Handbook and join Practical Machinist. It's a forum for machinists to help each other. If you can find a class it is well worth it. Good Luck!
Good advice. I am pgmrmike on PM.
miket is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-11-2016, 10:39 AM   #22
sir shovelhands
Ten Point
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Houston
Hunt In: Texas
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by txfireguy2003 View Post
Never heard of such a thing. Where would a guy go to look for this type of space?
Closest one to you is in Waco. It's called Maker's Edge Makerspace
sir shovelhands is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-11-2016, 12:41 PM   #23
txfireguy2003
Pope & Young
 
txfireguy2003's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Temple
Hunt In: Burnet Co.
Default

Thanks guys. I'm going to look into the Makerspace idea behind I jump into a machine purchase.

I was looking at the Grizzly 4003G which is supposed to be designed for the hobby gunsmith, but then I noticed that they have a lathe mill combo that is advertised as being the 4003G with a milling attachment added to it. I'm sure the mill won't be as good as a stand alone, but I can see how adding it would decrease the usefulness of the lathe, which is supposedly the same machine.
txfireguy2003 is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-11-2016, 12:59 PM   #24
kmitchl
Ten Point
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Montgomery, TX
Hunt In: Edwards Co
Default

The 4003G looks pretty good. You can add a DRO later. The mill attachment may get you in the game but I would not want to be cutting dovetails for a sight with it. Note the min barrel length through the headstock is 23" with the 4 jaw. You can probably reduce that by 2" if you build a spyder chuck for the inboard side of the spindle. IIRC the Grizzly GS lathes usually come with a spyder for the outboard end. One less tool to make.
kmitchl is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-11-2016, 05:23 PM   #25
txfireguy2003
Pope & Young
 
txfireguy2003's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Temple
Hunt In: Burnet Co.
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kmitchl View Post
The 4003G looks pretty good. You can add a DRO later. The mill attachment may get you in the game but I would not want to be cutting dovetails for a sight with it. Note the min barrel length through the headstock is 23" with the 4 jaw. You can probably reduce that by 2" if you build a spyder chuck for the inboard side of the spindle. IIRC the Grizzly GS lathes usually come with a spyder for the outboard end. One less tool to make.
Yeah, that's one of the main reasons I was looking at it was because of the outboard spider. The 23" minimum isn't a huge deal, as I think the only time I would HAVE to be right up against the headstock would be chambering a new barrel, which would be 27" or so long from the factory. Chamber and install, then if I want to cut it short/thread the muzzle etc, I can do that on a steady rest.

I figure I'll likely have to build or buy a spider for the inboard side at some point anyway though, so I can square up an action. I've seen the fixture that is basically a piece of pipe with 8 brass tipped screws, 4 in each end. You chuck that up in your lathe, then use it to hold the action and adjust it until you have as close to zero TIR at possible. Not sure how it would work on a barrel though.

As far as the mill is concerned, I'm not even sure what I want it for. I don't plan to be milling slides or cutting flutes on barrels or anything. I've just had projects over the years that would have been much easier with a mill. Maybe an 80 percent lower or something.
txfireguy2003 is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-11-2016, 05:36 PM   #26
GrapeApe
Eight Point
 
GrapeApe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Hunt In: Big Sandy Unit, SHNF
Default

My first was the griz 0602, I built spiders for it and used the steady. it only had a 1" spindle bore but I managed to make it work for a few rifles.
GrapeApe is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-11-2016, 07:04 PM   #27
txfireguy2003
Pope & Young
 
txfireguy2003's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Temple
Hunt In: Burnet Co.
Default

So everyone says I'll spend as much on tooling as I will on the machine itself. I can certainly see that with a mill, but not so much with the lathe. On the lathe, I'm thinking I need some turning and facing cutters, 60 degree threading tools, boring bars, reamers for chambering.... Runout gauges and calipers/micrometers, some of which I already have.....what am I missing?
txfireguy2003 is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-11-2016, 08:03 PM   #28
Graysonhogs
Pope & Young
 
Graysonhogs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Savoy, Texas
Hunt In: Fannin/Grayson/Erath
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by txfireguy2003 View Post
So everyone says I'll spend as much on tooling as I will on the machine itself. I can certainly see that with a mill, but not so much with the lathe. On the lathe, I'm thinking I need some turning and facing cutters, 60 degree threading tools, boring bars, reamers for chambering.... Runout gauges and calipers/micrometers, some of which I already have.....what am I missing?

Drills, center drills, taps(if you're tapping holes) . Indexable tooling is the way to go, cemented carbide, one goof and it's over to the grinder to redress. Tooling adds up fast. Jacobs or Albrect chucks.
Graysonhogs is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-11-2016, 08:33 PM   #29
txfireguy2003
Pope & Young
 
txfireguy2003's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Temple
Hunt In: Burnet Co.
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Graysonhogs View Post
Drills, center drills, taps(if you're tapping holes) . Indexable tooling is the way to go, cemented carbide, one goof and it's over to the grinder to redress. Tooling adds up fast. Jacobs or Albrect chucks.
Oh yeah, forgot about drills. What about HSS tools?
txfireguy2003 is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-11-2016, 08:40 PM   #30
Graysonhogs
Pope & Young
 
Graysonhogs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Savoy, Texas
Hunt In: Fannin/Grayson/Erath
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by txfireguy2003 View Post
Oh yeah, forgot about drills. What about HSS tools?

You can use em. You'll have to sharpen them though. $$

Grinder/wheels.
Graysonhogs is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-11-2016, 08:48 PM   #31
kmitchl
Ten Point
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Montgomery, TX
Hunt In: Edwards Co
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by txfireguy2003 View Post
Oh yeah, forgot about drills. What about HSS tools?
HSS drills work well for most applications. I use a lot of carbide but there are also indexable turning inserts in HSS available. I use carbide because the last lathe I bought the seller threw in about 30# of carbide inserts and toolholders.
kmitchl is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-11-2016, 09:08 PM   #32
Scoobyh
Eight Point
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Brenham, Tx
Default

HSS drills are fine. For cutting tools I would definitely go with inserted carbide. A little more cost upfront but will pay off. You can get a grade and chip breaker that will do a wide range of materials. I'm probably a little to far from you, but I have a shop full of machines and some scrap material if you would like to do some learning.

Scott
Scoobyh is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-11-2016, 09:12 PM   #33
GrapeApe
Eight Point
 
GrapeApe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Hunt In: Big Sandy Unit, SHNF
Default

a couple of Nogas, dial indicators, coolant/oils, emery paper, deburring tools, a few decent rules, spend the cash on a good set of real american or german twist drills, a set of left hand twist drills is a lifesaver in my shop, acme threading tools, magnifying lenses of all types come in handy, live centers, telescoping hole gauges, pin gauges, boring bars from .025 to 1.5 inch shank

i use insert tooling, brazed carbide and ground HSS

this is what I used just this week in addition to what is listed above.
GrapeApe is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-11-2016, 10:04 PM   #34
txfireguy2003
Pope & Young
 
txfireguy2003's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Temple
Hunt In: Burnet Co.
Default

Dang, I know so little I don't even know what I don't know!
txfireguy2003 is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-12-2016, 07:02 AM   #35
Graysonhogs
Pope & Young
 
Graysonhogs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Savoy, Texas
Hunt In: Fannin/Grayson/Erath
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by txfireguy2003 View Post
Dang, I know so little I don't even know what I don't know!

There are enough machinists here that you have plenty of backup.


I think we all agree, you never stop learning in this trade.
Graysonhogs is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-12-2016, 07:35 AM   #36
Goldeneagle
Pope & Young
 
Goldeneagle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Allen, TX
Hunt In: Where ever I get a chance.
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Graysonhogs View Post
There are enough machinists here that you have plenty of backup.


I think we all agree, you never stop learning in this trade.
This ^^^^^. There are still things I learn even after 40yrs of it.
Goldeneagle is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-12-2016, 08:12 AM   #37
GrapeApe
Eight Point
 
GrapeApe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Hunt In: Big Sandy Unit, SHNF
Default

I consider myself a relative idiot when it comes to machining. I learn a dozen new things a week, honestly.
GrapeApe is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-12-2016, 08:28 AM   #38
txfireguy2003
Pope & Young
 
txfireguy2003's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Temple
Hunt In: Burnet Co.
Default

Seems like there is a hundred different ways to do most things too. For example, I've seen guys drill holes on the lathe, and I've seen them bore holes. Just last night I saw a guy on YouTube facing a part with what I would call a turning tool based on geometry, by turning his tool post 90 degrees and coming at it from the end. Maybe not the RIGHT way, but it got the job done, and his finish looked good. I even saw a guy chambering a Remington 700 barrel, and when he did the relief cut for the bolt nose, he started it with an end mill, then finished it with a boring bar, whereas others might have single point cut that relief.
txfireguy2003 is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-12-2016, 08:44 AM   #39
Lungbustr
Pope & Young
 
Lungbustr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Texas
Default

I'm kind of in the same boat as you. I bought me a mill and have done a whole bunch of ar receivers and have been just learning as I go. Planning on putting a dro on it pretty soon. I think for the next projects I am going to get started on is 1911's.

I'll tell you one thing, it will keep you busy and broke. I can't seem to keep my hands off the **** thing.

In the future I plan on buying a lathe to do the same type projects you are wanting one for. I figure you might as well dive on in head first and start learning.
Lungbustr is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-12-2016, 08:45 AM   #40
Younggun1996
Six Point
 
Younggun1996's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Leon County/Waco
Hunt In: Leon County
Default

That's what I'm going to school for, It's fun stuff!!!
Younggun1996 is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-12-2016, 09:41 AM   #41
Goldeneagle
Pope & Young
 
Goldeneagle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Allen, TX
Hunt In: Where ever I get a chance.
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by txfireguy2003 View Post
Seems like there is a hundred different ways to do most things too. For example, I've seen guys drill holes on the lathe, and I've seen them bore holes. Just last night I saw a guy on YouTube facing a part with what I would call a turning tool based on geometry, by turning his tool post 90 degrees and coming at it from the end. Maybe not the RIGHT way, but it got the job done, and his finish looked good. I even saw a guy chambering a Remington 700 barrel, and when he did the relief cut for the bolt nose, he started it with an end mill, then finished it with a boring bar, whereas others might have single point cut that relief.
You need to bore holes for close tolerances and/or a smooth finish. As far as facing and turning with the same tool, that's how we run day in and day out. With our tooling we don't turn the tool. Just face and turn. The hole that started out with an end mill probably needed to be flat bottom, so an end mill is a good way to get a hole with a flat bottom started.
Goldeneagle is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-12-2016, 09:54 AM   #42
Goldeneagle
Pope & Young
 
Goldeneagle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Allen, TX
Hunt In: Where ever I get a chance.
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Younggun1996 View Post
That's what I'm going to school for, It's fun stuff!!!
You going to TSTC? I've known quite a few that went there.
Goldeneagle is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-14-2016, 12:33 AM   #43
txfireguy2003
Pope & Young
 
txfireguy2003's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Temple
Hunt In: Burnet Co.
Default

So, after looking on Craigslist last night for several hours, I may end up buying a used machine. Many of them seem to come with his usable tooling, and much cheaper than a new machine. Of course, they are going to have some wear, but hopefully not too much. I'm still not quite ready to jump in head over heels, maybe in a couple months I'll start looking real serious. I saw a South Bend Heavy 10 out of a HS shop up for sale for $2500 with the stand/cabinet and some tooling iirc. Also a full machine shop setup (albeit Asian machines) for the price of the lathe alone and that one had a mill, surface grinder, mill/lathe combo machine, and a 12x36 lathe and what appeared to be a ton of tooling still in sealed packaging.
txfireguy2003 is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-14-2016, 07:20 AM   #44
kmitchl
Ten Point
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Montgomery, TX
Hunt In: Edwards Co
Default

On used lathes look for way wear near the headstock. That is the area most frequently used. Also check the spindle bore on a SB heavy 10. Check the chuck mounting. I don't care for threaded chucks. They are well known for getting stuck on the spindle and can't be turned backwards because they will unscrew. My preference is D1-4 or D1-5. Just a few things to be aware of.

I use a quick change tool post and make some of my own tool holders. The one I use most frequently is a carbide insert tool older with one end set up for turning and one end set up for facing. To go from turning to facing I just move the tool over to the other position on the QCTP. Aloris QCTP are nice but the Phase II stuff works for me. Look at CDCO and Shars for "cost effective" tooling.
kmitchl is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-14-2016, 04:59 PM   #45
txfireguy2003
Pope & Young
 
txfireguy2003's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Temple
Hunt In: Burnet Co.
Default

That all makes sense. Except I can't figure out the wear on the ways. I mean, seems to me that it would take a ton of work to wear the ways enough to be of concern. I mean like millions of turning passes, but maybe I'm overestimating.
txfireguy2003 is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-14-2016, 06:07 PM   #46
kmitchl
Ten Point
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Montgomery, TX
Hunt In: Edwards Co
Default

A lot of the older machines were used in production shops where they turned out the same part for 8-10 hours per day five or six days per week on two or three shifts. Over time the ways wore with the carriage traveling over them. In today's environment there are not many manual machines used in production operations. CNC has taken over those tasks. Manual machines are relegated to prototypes, maintenance, and one off pieces.
kmitchl is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-15-2016, 05:41 AM   #47
Goldeneagle
Pope & Young
 
Goldeneagle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Allen, TX
Hunt In: Where ever I get a chance.
Default

You can face and turn with the same tool without indexing it.
Goldeneagle is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-15-2016, 06:28 AM   #48
Goldeneagle
Pope & Young
 
Goldeneagle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Allen, TX
Hunt In: Where ever I get a chance.
Default

This will rough face AND turn
Name:  0215160620-00.jpg
Views: 234
Size:  19.7 KB

This is finish face AND turn.
Name:  0215160620-01.jpg
Views: 234
Size:  19.8 KB
Goldeneagle is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 02-15-2016, 03:55 PM   #49
Younggun1996
Six Point
 
Younggun1996's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Leon County/Waco
Hunt In: Leon County
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Goldeneagle View Post
You going to TSTC? I've known quite a few that went there.
yes, I'm to TSTC
Younggun1996 is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 01-18-2019, 08:30 PM   #50
matt.howell411
Spike
 
matt.howell411's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Default

Iím a machinist. All I can say is practice safety at all times if youíre just gonna teach yourself. Use safety glasses and watch your hand placement etc. itís a dangerous job/hobby. Look up videos on machine shop safety before diving in. Good luck!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
matt.howell411 is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:16 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Copyright 1999-2012, TexasBowhunter.com