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Old 12-21-2016, 01:35 PM   #101
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From one biologist to another; I tip my Stetson to a great job on your part. Awesome thread.
As a biologist myself, I always appreciate hearing someone else talk about WTD behavior/etc in "layman terms". We all learned the latin terms for species and the "correct biological phrases" in college but that is of very little use if you can't translate it over to easily understood analogies for the general public.

This is an awesome post and THANKS to all the experts who contribute. I believe Ben Franklin said "I can learn something from each person I meet daily if I will but listen". Or at least something like that!! lol
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Old 12-21-2016, 01:51 PM   #102
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Great thread and useful information. Thanks.
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Old 12-21-2016, 02:20 PM   #103
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Most feed additives and attractants are made more for you than they are for deer. The same applies for scent lures and urines. I have made it a habit to pee in scrapes I find near where I am hunting or guiding hunters. I have people ask me all the time though about it and it's kinda funny the looks I get when people realize what I am saying.

Pee is pee for the most part. I have people say, "yeah, but it smells like coffee and that buck is gonna know you were here!" Really? How does a deer know what coffee even is? You telling me he gets up every morning and fixes himself a cup before hitting the food plot? All he knows is someone else peed in his territory and it makes him mad, not scared. Think about it......
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Old 12-21-2016, 03:00 PM   #104
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Most feed additives and attractants are made more for you than they are for deer. The same applies for scent lures and urines. I have made it a habit to pee in scrapes I find near where I am hunting or guiding hunters. I have people ask me all the time though about it and it's kinda funny the looks I get when people realize what I am saying.

Pee is pee for the most part. I have people say, "yeah, but it smells like coffee and that buck is gonna know you were here!" Really? How does a deer know what coffee even is? You telling me he gets up every morning and fixes himself a cup before hitting the food plot? All he knows is someone else peed in his territory and it makes him mad, not scared. Think about it......
I know it works for a lot of people but I have never had any luck with deer pee, my pee or any of the other stuff that works for others. I just sit and watch corn or a food plot.
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Old 12-21-2016, 04:01 PM   #105
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Most feed additives and attractants are made more for you than they are for deer. The same applies for scent lures and urines. I have made it a habit to pee in scrapes I find near where I am hunting or guiding hunters. I have people ask me all the time though about it and it's kinda funny the looks I get when people realize what I am saying.

Pee is pee for the most part. I have people say, "yeah, but it smells like coffee and that buck is gonna know you were here!" Really? How does a deer know what coffee even is? You telling me he gets up every morning and fixes himself a cup before hitting the food plot? All he knows is someone else peed in his territory and it makes him mad, not scared. Think about it......
I have been hearing about this on the GS for a little while. Three weeks ago I came up on a scrape and peed in it, as my wife laughed at me and told me that cant be a good idea. I explained why I think it might work. Last week I go up there to to put some corn out and guess what that scrape was bigger and the licking branch was even more beat up. Then about 20 feet away was another scrape. So I peed in the same scrape I did last time. Then hunted that Sunday and the scrape was even larger, so I peed in both of them and put a camera on them. Can't wait for Friday to see what the scrapes looks like and what the camera got pictures of. My question is why the scrapes so late in the season?... they were not there in November.
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Old 12-21-2016, 10:27 PM   #106
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^ In areas with high quality and even a high amount of "regular" browse under good range conditions, deer don't tend to rely nearly as much on supplemental feed, because they don't have to. Even when they do use protein feeders, it doesn't make up a huge portion of their daily intake in most cases. Same goes for mineral supplements. Deer will only use "free" mineral if they need it, not because they want it or because it tastes good. Their body dictates when they need more mineral in their diet.
Yessir, on that same lease they would use a mineral site...that sounds kinda odd, but that's what they would do. The deer would trample all in it and eat the dirt. My Newton lease, things gotta be bad for the deer to use a mineral site.
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Old 12-21-2016, 10:35 PM   #107
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I have been hearing about this on the GS for a little while. Three weeks ago I came up on a scrape and peed in it, as my wife laughed at me and told me that cant be a good idea. I explained why I think it might work. Last week I go up there to to put some corn out and guess what that scrape was bigger and the licking branch was even more beat up. Then about 20 feet away was another scrape. So I peed in the same scrape I did last time. Then hunted that Sunday and the scrape was even larger, so I peed in both of them and put a camera on them. Can't wait for Friday to see what the scrapes looks like and what the camera got pictures of. My question is why the scrapes so late in the season?... they were not there in November.


You should start a thread on this!!!!!


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Old 12-22-2016, 08:15 AM   #108
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Depending on your area of the state, sex ratio of your herd and habitat, the breeding season will vary greatly. You will also see what a lot of people call the "second rut" which is and it isn't. Does will cycle every 21 days if not bred the first time they come into estrous. If not bred, 21 days later they will cycle again and you can see some rutting activity. You will also see a late rut in January as this years fawns that are born early enough will cycle then and can be bred.
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Old 12-22-2016, 08:32 AM   #109
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Depending on your area of the state, sex ratio of your herd and habitat, the breeding season will vary greatly. You will also see what a lot of people call the "second rut" which is and it isn't. Does will cycle every 21 days if not bred the first time they come into estrous. If not bred, 21 days later they will cycle again and you can see some rutting activity. You will also see a late rut in January as this years fawns that are born early enough will cycle then and can be bred.
Everything I have ever read, heard or seen published has said they will cycle every 28 days. This is the first I have ever heard of a 21 day cycle. Can you explain the discrepancy? Please don't take me for saying that you're wrong, Im truly just trying to learn.
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Old 12-22-2016, 10:28 AM   #110
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It is not a hard number. Every deer/area is a little different. In my experience with pen raised deer, it's about every 21 days....
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Old 12-22-2016, 11:30 AM   #111
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Awesome thread! If you feed protein in a area that has some good pressure do you think it's a waste or will you still get some positive out of it?
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Old 12-22-2016, 02:11 PM   #112
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Awesome thread! If you feed protein in a area that has some good pressure do you think it's a waste or will you still get some positive out of it?
If it's small propery and neighbors shoot anything with antlers then it's a waste of time. Since deer peak in antler growth at 6-7 yrs, then you wont realize your return for investment if no bucks make it past 2-3 yrs.
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Old 12-23-2016, 08:03 AM   #113
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Ok, all caught up, now on to more info....

Since there seems to be a good interest in deer foods, lets continue on there. Deer are selective feeders, meaning that they eat a huge variety of things. They don't just sit in one area eating the same thing every day like a cow does grass in a field. Typically you will see deer feeding along and almost always moving while doing so. They get a little bite here, and one there. That is why most people like to use seed varieties in food plots for greater utilization. Simply put, deer like to eat a lot of different things. A lot of it is based on what is available in a given area and time of year.

Deer are also curious animals when it comes to food items. That's why a lot of the fly-by-night feed attractants seem to work. Deer see/smell something different, they take a look and see what's up. Most of the ones in my experience that are used repeatedly are the sweet style attractants. Everybody like something sweet now and then. I always laugh at the marketing on these items when they are telling of the scents and smells that deer go crazy for. Do you really think a deer in central Texas has any idea what an apple is? Or an orange? Nope, just something they smell is sweet and not a threat to them....
I threw out a bag of apples that I had cut in half last year, just to see if the deer would show any interest in them. All the deer did was sniff them and kept on going. I figured it was something they had never seen, eaten or smelled before so they weren't sure what they were.
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Old 12-23-2016, 08:46 AM   #114
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You should start a thread on this!!!!!


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OK I know it's kinda late to start one but when I pull the card and see what's on it I'll start one.
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Old 12-23-2016, 08:27 PM   #115
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I threw out a bag of apples that I had cut in half last year, just to see if the deer would show any interest in them. All the deer did was sniff them and kept on going. I figured it was something they had never seen, eaten or smelled before so they weren't sure what they were.
I did the same thing with some watermelons several years back. Cut them up, threw them out in front of a cam and left. Came back the next day and the watermelon was all gone. I figured hogs or coons had gotten them. This was back when trail cams were 35mm so I had to wait a while to get the pics. Got the pics back and to my surprise it was the deer that had cleaned them up. I still use watermelon to this day. I don't even cut them up anymore. Just throw them out. The deer will stomp or "paw" at them to break them open.
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Old 12-24-2016, 07:58 AM   #116
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You've just gotta figure out what the deer in your area like. Rice Bran is like crack to my deer in Oklahoma, whereas the deer on my lease in East Texas won't touch it.
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Old 12-24-2016, 12:27 PM   #117
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Many feed cottonseed and protein - what about mineral supplements? I know protein has some but is there value in also feeding additional minerals during the year? I have heard it can have a big impact on horn growth
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Old 12-24-2016, 12:40 PM   #118
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Great info in thread
I'm following
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Old 12-24-2016, 01:24 PM   #119
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Many feed cottonseed and protein - what about mineral supplements? I know protein has some but is there value in also feeding additional minerals during the year? I have heard it can have a big impact on horn growth
I was writing a lengthy explanation, but thought the Quality Deer Mgt guys probably already had one on their website. And they did.

https://www.qdma.com/minerals-for-whitetails/

I will add to that by saying that sodium requirements for deer are easily met in in most parts of Texas, typically just through the water they drink. Read the info at the link above, and my statement about sodium will make sense.
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Old 12-26-2016, 10:34 PM   #120
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After seeing all the posts about cull bucks, I wanted to make a general recommendation on buck harvest.

In a free range situation, the best approach in buck harvest, to maximize quality antlers, is to only shoot bucks that are 6.5 years old or older, regardless of what's on their head.

Not confident in field judging age? Check the poster at the link below, and let bucks walk until they match the "Post Mature" criteria on this poster.

http://www.whitetailsunlimited.com/s...-to-buck-deer/
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Old 01-02-2017, 09:37 AM   #121
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Touching on TOT's previous post, when recommending harvest recommendations on ranches I have worked on and with. My general rule, is to take out the bottom percentage of each age class of bucks. In other words, if you have an estimated (20) 3 year old bucks, and all of them are 10 points except for 5 8 points, take out the two 8 points. Same goes for everything 2yrs and older. 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 year old age class bucks.

My reasoning for this is based mainly on HF ranches. My analogy is that there are only so many seats at the table, and you need to have the better looking deer sitting there, not the smaller deer. I know as always, there are always exceptions to the rule, but it's a general start to getting better deer. "Trophy" animals are always dependent on the ranch, time, genetics and 100 other things....
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Old 01-02-2017, 11:50 AM   #122
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Touching on TOT's previous post, when recommending harvest recommendations on ranches I have worked on and with. My general rule, is to take out the bottom percentage of each age class of bucks. In other words, if you have an estimated (20) 3 year old bucks, and all of them are 10 points except for 5 8 points, take out the two 8 points. Same goes for everything 2yrs and older. 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 year old age class bucks.

My reasoning for this is based mainly on HF ranches. My analogy is that there are only so many seats at the table, and you need to have the better looking deer sitting there, not the smaller deer. I know as always, there are always exceptions to the rule, but it's a general start to getting better deer. "Trophy" animals are always dependent on the ranch, time, genetics and 100 other things....
Is it a bad thing to let 8 pointers walk? I let a nice 8 walk, he looked to be 3 1/2 with good tine length and good mass.
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Old 01-02-2017, 11:54 AM   #123
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What is your opinion on nubbins based on the research that they relocate before age 1yr?
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Old 01-02-2017, 12:43 PM   #124
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It's not bad to let 8's walk. All depends on your existing genetics and herd makeup. I personally love really big 8's. The number of antler points is irrelevant except to the landowner/manager. If all you have to work with are 8-9pt genetics, maximize them the best you can with better nutrition and habitat.

Nubbin bucks are just this years born fawns. Some will and some won't actually break the skin. This is why I always completely disregard the harvest of yearling deer. Small rack size as a yearling is influenced by waaaay too many things from being born late, not enough groceries from momma..... Let them get to at least 2 years before making any kind of decision.
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Old 01-02-2017, 12:46 PM   #125
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Also, a WTD's typical home range is only about 1-1.5 sq miles, except during the rut. They really don't migrate to any extent down here or "relocate" unless there is a very high density of bucks and fighting displaces them.
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Old 01-02-2017, 01:03 PM   #126
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Also, a WTD's typical home range is only about 1-1.5 sq miles, except during the rut. They really don't migrate to any extent down here or "relocate" unless there is a very high density of bucks and fighting displaces them.


How much land can a big buck cover during the rut?
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Old 01-02-2017, 01:39 PM   #127
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4-5 miles on average
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Old 01-02-2017, 01:59 PM   #128
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4-5 miles on average


Thanks
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Old 01-02-2017, 02:40 PM   #129
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It's not bad to let 8's walk. All depends on your existing genetics and herd makeup. I personally love really big 8's. The number of antler points is irrelevant except to the landowner/manager. If all you have to work with are 8-9pt genetics, maximize them the best you can with better nutrition and habitat.

Nubbin bucks are just this years born fawns. Some will and some won't actually break the skin. This is why I always completely disregard the harvest of yearling deer. Small rack size as a yearling is influenced by waaaay too many things from being born late, not enough groceries from momma..... Let them get to at least 2 years before making any kind of decision.
Do you think nubbins should be off limits?

I like reading a lot of biologist material. I was reading about radio telemetry studies and they tagged some nubbins. The results were 100% of them relocated anywhere from 1 mile to 5 miles away with an extreme case of a long distance relocation. Have yall put radio collars on any deer? Just curious what the results would be.
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Old 01-02-2017, 03:19 PM   #130
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Tagged, good stuff, thanks
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Old 01-02-2017, 05:24 PM   #131
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I really think that distances deer travel really depends on the deer.

We had one deer on camera most of august and then he disappeared during most of September. We started picking him up again in October.

While surfing on the hunting forums one guy on there posted a pic of the same deer which was from September. Turns out this guys place is at least 5 miles away as a crow flys. So in essence this deer traveled at least 15 miles back and forth in 3 months.

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Old 01-02-2017, 05:35 PM   #132
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Great thread.
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Old 01-03-2017, 02:35 PM   #133
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Yes, nubbins should be off limits. Distance travelled depends on doe density and bucks density in a given area to determine how far they HAVE to travel to find does.
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Old 01-03-2017, 02:52 PM   #134
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Touching on TOT's previous post, when recommending harvest recommendations on ranches I have worked on and with. My general rule, is to take out the bottom percentage of each age class of bucks. In other words, if you have an estimated (20) 3 year old bucks, and all of them are 10 points except for 5 8 points, take out the two 8 points. Same goes for everything 2yrs and older. 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 year old age class bucks.

My reasoning for this is based mainly on HF ranches. My analogy is that there are only so many seats at the table, and you need to have the better looking deer sitting there, not the smaller deer. I know as always, there are always exceptions to the rule, but it's a general start to getting better deer. "Trophy" animals are always dependent on the ranch, time, genetics and 100 other things....
If strictly high fence, I'm with ya 100%! Otherwise just let all the bucks get old. I can expand on that if anyone wants.
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Old 01-03-2017, 02:55 PM   #135
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Also, a WTD's typical home range is only about 1-1.5 sq miles, except during the rut. They really don't migrate to any extent down here or "relocate" unless there is a very high density of bucks and fighting displaces them.
That home range is correct for most of Texas. It's much larger out west, rolling plains, and Panhandle because habitat is not uniform across the landscape in those areas.
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Old 01-03-2017, 03:09 PM   #136
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What is your opinion on nubbins based on the research that they relocate before age 1yr?
I don't mean to split hairs, but what research are you refering to? Reason I ask, is that all research Im aware of shows buck fawns hang pretty close to momma's home until fall at 1.5 yrs and first set of antlers. Thus the name "The Fall Shuffle "

As I recall, yearling buck dispersal varies depending on deer densities and habitat uniformity and distribution. For example, S TX, where habitat is pretty constant over a very large area with similar densities and sex ratios throughout, dispersal distances are around 3-6 miles. In Illinois farm and creek bottom country it was more like 8-12 miles.
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Old 01-03-2017, 03:36 PM   #137
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You spoke briefly that some fawn does that are born earlier in the cycle are bred their first year.
Can you speak to that more? Do you have a ballpark percentage that you have seen? I understand there are many variables. Also any information on fawn survival rates of fawns born to 1yo does?

Second question

We manage the exact same way that you suggested, shooting the bottom out of each age class. My fear is that we are shooting young bucks (1 and 2 yo's) that are not genetically inferior, but just younger than the other deer in their age group. My question, is how long does it take a buck to catch up to his age class deer if he was born in late July and most his age class were born in late May? Are they caught up by their second set of antlers or does it take longer?

We are in the exact same boat as only having so many seats in the table, which forces us to make decisions on deer younger than I would prefer.
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Old 01-03-2017, 04:12 PM   #138
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You spoke briefly that some fawn does that are born earlier in the cycle are bred their first year.
Can you speak to that more? Do you have a ballpark percentage that you have seen? I understand there are many variables. Also any information on fawn survival rates of fawns born to 1yo does?

Second question

We manage the exact same way that you suggested, shooting the bottom out of each age class. My fear is that we are shooting young bucks (1 and 2 yo's) that are not genetically inferior, but just younger than the other deer in their age group. My question, is how long does it take a buck to catch up to his age class deer if he was born in late July and most his age class were born in late May? Are they caught up by their second set of antlers or does it take longer?

We are in the exact same boat as only having so many seats in the table, which forces us to make decisions on deer younger than I would prefer.
To try and answer the first question, it's hard to say an actual percentage of first year fawn that get bred, but just a WAG would probably be about 30%. Fawn survival rate can come down to a coyote making a right or left hand turn and finding one. Typically, fawn survival rates are listed at .75% for does in the wild if I remember correctly.

Second question, to answer that, re-read my comment about not shooting yearlings and MOST 2yr olds. I start "culling" at 3 years with given exceptions to 2 yr olds on things like pedicle damage, injury.... Bucks that are "born later" should be on the same page by 1.5 as all other deer in that age class. In other words, if you have a group of fawns born in May of 2016 and some born in Aug 2016, they should all be "equal" by the following November of 2017. Make sense? Clear as mud? Sometimes I confuse myself....
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Old 01-03-2017, 04:27 PM   #139
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You spoke to brush control / chaining vs dozer / and preferring burning.

We are in Shackelford county with 90 Mesquite and hackberry trees. While we have done some substantial brush control and sculpting, much of the ranch still has far too much prickly pear. Especially making it difficult to run dogs for the quail.

We differed all grazing in 2016, and have exceptional ground "fuel" this year with all the grass and weed growth. Would a spring burn serve to kill off a substantial amount of the prickly pear, or are we looking at areal herbicides as our best option? The Tordon from the heli method is effective but extremely expensive.

Thanks and great thread.
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Old 01-03-2017, 04:57 PM   #140
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You can burn as long as you can carry a good fire. It's not great a killing out pear but can knock it back. Depending on fuel load, you can back burn heavy pear areas for a better kill. Most guys I know that burn pear, come back in when it starts to regrow and apply a herbicide then and seem to have a better uptake of the chemical for a better kill on it.
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Old 01-03-2017, 05:02 PM   #141
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Be sure to get professional guidance with a prescribed fire! I would suggest your area TPWD Technical Guidance Biologist.

http://tpwd.texas.gov/landwater/land...ty=shackelford

Best control is with a fire immediately followed with Tordon, however thats usually used by cattle ranches.
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Old 01-03-2017, 08:39 PM   #142
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I don't mean to split hairs, but what research are you refering to? Reason I ask, is that all research Im aware of shows buck fawns hang pretty close to momma's home until fall at 1.5 yrs and first set of antlers. Thus the name "The Fall Shuffle "

As I recall, yearling buck dispersal varies depending on deer densities and habitat uniformity and distribution. For example, S TX, where habitat is pretty constant over a very large area with similar densities and sex ratios throughout, dispersal distances are around 3-6 miles. In Illinois farm and creek bottom country it was more like 8-12 miles.
You are right, I said 1 year old meaning 1.5. I don't recall specifically what biologist or college. A radio telemetry survey was being done, I assume most biologist do this, it was very interesting that all the nubbin/spikes left the area completely. I don't know that I buy the habitat uniformity. I know that may affect deer density in specific areas, but that would affect all deer, not just yearlings.

My understanding is the doe was responsible for the dispersion of buck fawns/yearlings. I guess it depends on who wrote the thesis and who accepts it. The way I see it is certain characteristics were put into male vs female animals. Dispersion is one of those things. God said, "Thou shalt not breed thy mother nor thy sister"
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Old 01-04-2017, 02:19 AM   #143
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The uniformity is refering to the fact that the same habitat the buck fawn was born in is the same no matter where the dispersing buck fawn goes, so to find suitable habitat, he doesnt have to go far. If habitat is broken, that is in pathces or along drainages, then he has to go farther to find suitable habitat.

Yearlings (1.5 yr) disperse. Once a deer reaches about 2 yr old, he's in the area he'll stay.

Dispersal is God's way of maintaining genetic diversity.
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Old 01-04-2017, 08:27 AM   #144
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The uniformity is refering to the fact that the same habitat the buck fawn was born in is the same no matter where the dispersing buck fawn goes, so to find suitable habitat, he doesnt have to go far. If habitat is broken, that is in pathces or along drainages, then he has to go farther to find suitable habitat.

Yearlings (1.5 yr) disperse. Once a deer reaches about 2 yr old, he's in the area he'll stay.

Dispersal is God's way of maintaining genetic diversity.
Yessir

Great thread. As a bowhunter it really appeals to me.
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Old 01-04-2017, 08:50 AM   #145
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What about natural disaster affecting deer location/movement? I.e. severe flooding for those of us that hunt river bottoms.

Do the deer push out and come back, find new habitat, find high areas and stay?
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Old 01-04-2017, 09:28 AM   #146
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What about natural disaster affecting deer location/movement? I.e. severe flooding for those of us that hunt river bottoms.

Do the deer push out and come back, find new habitat, find high areas and stay?
Following. A tornado ripped every hardwood in our hardwood bottom on 40 acres in May. It looks like an atomic bomb exploded and wiped everything out. Following that, a crew came in and thinned out the pines and another guy came in a logged much of the hardwoods that were salvageable. I did not see a deer all season on this property. I truly believed all of this activity pushed any deer off.

My question is with piles of hardwoods lying around should they be burned or can I leave them lay and let them grow up into thickets?

And, how can I try to pull deer back onto this property? I am running a corn feeder and going to try to run it all year. We have much hunting pressure all around us.
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Old 01-04-2017, 11:40 AM   #147
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CastBlast, US A Retired....

Those are pretty site specific questions that would require site specific knowledge to properly address. In general, deer are what's called a mid-successional species. Succession is a term that refers to the natural changes that occur in a plant community. For example, if you took a stand of big, old hardwoods and pines and logged it, you would be taking a late successional community and turning it to an early successional community. So what was big tall trees, now becomes weeds, grass, bushes, vines, and little trees. That community will gradually change back to what it was before it was logged.

So, if you think about what deer need, weeds & browse for food, some thick cover to hide in, and water, then a tornado and logging would most likely improve the habitat for deer. Again, site specific as well as intensity specific (how much and to what degree). Now, to our human eye, which tends to lean on beauty, we'd rather see a big, pretty hardwood stand and not a bunch of slash laying around and grown up weeds and thickets. But to a deer, it's a steak house, Baskin-Robbins, and up scale Hotel, all right there in one spot. So, Retired Army, without seeing it, I would think that nothing is the best thing you could do.

As for flooded bottoms, the floods wash in tons of nutrients, amd combined with the extra moisture, grow fabulous deer food. Yes, they'll come back.

As I've posted several times before in multiple threads, you can get free, expert assistance from your areas TPWD Technical Guidance Biologist who will have site specific knowledge and recommendations.

http://tpwd.texas.gov/landwater/land...ce/biologists/
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Old 01-04-2017, 12:23 PM   #148
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Excellent thread, I'll post info on a seminar I attended a few years ago ( Nobel Foundation).
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Old 01-04-2017, 01:28 PM   #149
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CastBlast, US A Retired....



Those are pretty site specific questions that would require site specific knowledge to properly address. In general, deer are what's called a mid-successional species. Succession is a term that refers to the natural changes that occur in a plant community. For example, if you took a stand of big, old hardwoods and pines and logged it, you would be taking a late successional community and turning it to an early successional community. So what was big tall trees, now becomes weeds, grass, bushes, vines, and little trees. That community will gradually change back to what it was before it was logged.



So, if you think about what deer need, weeds & browse for food, some thick cover to hide in, and water, then a tornado and logging would most likely improve the habitat for deer. Again, site specific as well as intensity specific (how much and to what degree). Now, to our human eye, which tends to lean on beauty, we'd rather see a big, pretty hardwood stand and not a bunch of slash laying around and grown up weeds and thickets. But to a deer, it's a steak house, Baskin-Robbins, and up scale Hotel, all right there in one spot. So, Retired Army, without seeing it, I would think that nothing is the best thing you could do.



As for flooded bottoms, the floods wash in tons of nutrients, amd combined with the extra moisture, grow fabulous deer food. Yes, they'll come back.



As I've posted several times before in multiple threads, you can get free, expert assistance from your areas TPWD Technical Guidance Biologist who will have site specific knowledge and recommendations.



http://tpwd.texas.gov/landwater/land...ce/biologists/


Thank you for your response. Probably 70% of our property was under water for 6 months or longer. A ton of browse was killed, but a lot of river silt washed in. I assume that we will have some great browse growth in the following years, but this year was tough.

I am more wondering about deer movement. If they are pushed out for that long, what are the chances of mature deer returning to original habitat vs. staying relocated? It is probably impossible to answer due to a million variables, but I wonder how "attached" deer are to their original habitat?
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Old 01-04-2017, 02:28 PM   #150
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Thank you for your response. Probably 70% of our property was under water for 6 months or longer. A ton of browse was killed, but a lot of river silt washed in. I assume that we will have some great browse growth in the following years, but this year was tough.

I am more wondering about deer movement. If they are pushed out for that long, what are the chances of mature deer returning to original habitat vs. staying relocated? It is probably impossible to answer due to a million variables, but I wonder how "attached" deer are to their original habitat?
C&B

I can tell you that in north La. I am involved with an 8000 acre property between the Ms. River levee and the river. Floods every year with times where the entire property goes under water. The deer move to high ground when the floods come and somehow know exactly when they can return. Essentially all the deer return once the water starts subsiding. They even hit the high spots deep in flooded country before all the water is gone. This behavior is fairly common along the islands and numerous properties inside the levee.
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