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Old 12-29-2015, 12:50 PM   #1
Rat
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Default The definitive Single Vs. Multiple Pin thread.

Adjustable, moveable, sliders, single pin; call 'em what you will but these sights have made a big impact in target archery. And now it seems they are making a big impact on our hunting as well.

It wasn't long ago that you would be hard pressed to find an adjustable sight made for bow hunting; now just about every sight manufacturer has a model and some have abandoned all other accessories to build only sights!

Common questions we hear are, "How many have tried sliders but gone back to fixed pins?", or "Who has tried single pins sights and liked them?"

What we really want to know is, "Are they worth the money and do they work"?

Let's go back in time. Single pin, movable sights are an offshoot of target archery, where repeatability in a sight is paramount. Shot after shot the sight must be stable, repeatable and easy to adjust for variables during a competition.

Single pin, adjustable sights fit this bill very well. While they remained a mainstay in target archery they didn't quite fit the bill for the larger hunting crowd. The main reason being durability. The small pin was easily damaged, the small scope and housing was not much protection, the scope rod, or threaded connector, was small and easily damaged, extreme range adjustments required a lot of time to make or were noisy and a whole host of other things made them less than desirable for hunting.

Some of us used our target archery sights and made custom pin housings for hunting in an effort to get the accuracy in the field we enjoyed at competition. We made PVC scope housings, we cannibalized other sights to build a better adjustable hunting sight and on and on...

Thankfully, we no longer need to go to such extremes to have a quality adjustable sight that is tough enough for hunting.

With the question of accuracy and repeatability out of the way the real question is:

Are they tough enough?
The answer is yes, but with a caveat. Like any precision instrument, they can be damaged; and more easily than their fixed pin brothers in many cases. Of course some companies build a bomb proof product (Spot Hogg, MBG etc.) and some build one that needs a lighter hand. They are all built to do the job (within reason) but some are better built to handle abuse.

Also remember, they have moving parts; so regular maintenance is required, especially cleaning. Fixed pin sights do not need this but there is nothing worse than an adjustable sight that will not budge due to dirt build up in the mechanism.

Next topic: How do they work?
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Old 12-29-2015, 12:56 PM   #2
Shane
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I've been thinking about switching to a 3-pin slider. I'm thinking that would give me the best of both worlds.... Fixed pin simplicity for 20-30-40 yards, and then adjustable bottom pin for longer shots (like if I was ever hunting elk spot and stalk and wanted to shoot 50-75 yards).
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Old 12-29-2015, 01:15 PM   #3
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I was using a 5 pin slider. 20 to 50 yards. Bottom pin I put at the bottom and that was my 60 plus. Did this for stalking. But hunting pigs at night got where I was having problems. Eyes going bad. So now I have a two pin. Top pin is 0 to 60 yards. Bottom pin 65 plus



Good write rat
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Old 12-29-2015, 01:51 PM   #4
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Default How do they work?

How do movable pin sights work?

They work great! Yea, not what you meant right.
Basically you have a pin affixed to a scope or housing and the pin doesn't move within the housing like a traditional multiple pin sight.

There is an indexed (indexed with yardage) wheel that is rotated to select the target yardage; rotating this wheel or thumb screw moves the whole scope (with the pin) up or down to reference the indexed yardage. Make sense?

One pin (in the scope or housing) moves up and down to cover multiple yardages.

Sometimes, in lieu of a wheel, there is a pointer at the rear of the sight bracket or a rod used with the index finger of the grip hand; the job is the same, to move the pin to adjust for yardage.

This is very important when thinking about movable pin sights depending on your style of hunting. Things to consider...

Do you hunt with a bow mounted quiver? A forward mounted wheel may not be visible with a quiver or, a rear mounted wheel may not allow the quiver to attach to your liking. Think about how you will adjust the sight with the quiver mounted keeping in mind you also need to have a good line of sight to the tape.

Sitting or stalking? Blind hunters may not need the ability to make on-the-fly adjustments like spot and stalk hunters. Having a sight that is adjustable at full draw may seem like a non-issue to a blind hunter but may be the deciding factor for a spot and stalk hunter. You must consider how you hunt and make the best determination for your style of hunting. I like the forward wheel myself, but I am also aware that I may miss a shot by not being able to make an adjustment while at full draw; I'm okay with that trade off, you may not be.

Where is the tape? The index can be located inboard, outboard or both. Look at what is available to see if there is something better to fit your needs. If you want to be able to make adjustments at full draw you may want the tape inboard so you can see it through the peep when you make adjustments.

Also, the tape color makes a difference and maybe whether or not it is glow-in-the-dark. It can be hard to see a tape in low light conditions sitting in a dark blind.

Smooth adjustment or click adjustment? Sights will generally have two types of adjustment. Smooth and Click. Many have a smooth rough adjustment and then a click micro adjustment; others may have a click adjustment on both smooth and micro adjustment. For hunting sights the micro adjust feature is less used than in competition. But it is very useful for indexing the sight for variables. For instance, if it is raining I can shoot my 20 yard setting and I may need to adjust up 4 clicks to make it perfect. Then, once in the field, I know I will need to adjust up a few clicks (or hold over) for whatever yardage I am shooting. Extreme elevation changes can also account for your equipment being off; use the micro adjustments to account for this.

Accuracy and repeatability, Circling back to this suffice it to say that virtually all modern movable sights are going to be more accurate and repeatable than their fixed pin brothers all else being equal, which it usually isn't.

Next: Set up.
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Old 12-29-2015, 02:18 PM   #5
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Default Movable Pin Set Up.

How difficult are movable pin sights to set up? Contrary to the popular thinking, you don't need to be a rocket scientist to set up a movable pin sight; in fact, you only need to be able to count to the longest distance you want to shoot.

How long does it take to set up a slider? That depends on the shooter and the sight. I can set up a slider that comes with factory tape in about 30-35 minutes. I can set up a slider using an archery program like Archer's Advantage, a good scale and chronograph, in a little less time, say 20-25 minutes.

Compare that to how long it takes you to set up a fixed pin sight and you can see that there isn't much of a difference in the time it takes. Especially when you can shoot out to 100+ yards with the slider and you would need to set up eight pins on your fixed pin sight!

Of course, setting one up for the first timer will take longer than my posted times, but still, it's a one time investment of labor plus, who doesn't like tinkering with new gear?

Tapes? Print tapes, order factory tapes, scales, chronographs: whaaaaaat? It's okay, just breath; all you really need is some masking tape and a pencil... You don't NEED to have all the fancy tape for your index, but it is easier. You can just shoot in the sight for each yardage out to as far as you are willing, or able, to shoot. Use a pen to make the marks on your masking tape for your index. This will at least get you started until you can get some pre-printed tapes ordered.

While we are on set up let's talk about mounting options.

Dovetail versus fixed. I like a dove tail mount for two reasons: 1) it is easy to remove for transporting and to make adjustments (like adding a new tape) 2) it is easy to adjust the distance to get the perfect fit with my peep.

Fixed has some advantages, namely: 1) more compact design sits closer to the riser 2) no adapter needed for the bow mounted quiver.

The long bar dovetail has one other advantage. The farther away from the peep the scope is the more accurate you will be. If you are moving to a slider pin sight for accuracy then a long bar dovetail should be considered. Chances are it will not stick out past your stabilizer and definitely not past your arrow; so the odds of it being 'in the way' are largely in our heads and have no place in the real world.

Next: Scope Options
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Old 12-29-2015, 02:28 PM   #6
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Thanks! Nice job.
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Old 12-29-2015, 03:12 PM   #7
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Default Scope Options

If you can think of it, they probably have it! Back in the day, Classic Scope was really the only game in town for good quality aftermarket scopes. Now there are a truck load of scopes in every configuration you can imagine, almost.

Cross hair, dots, fiber, clarifiers lenses, hoods, lights, shaded reticle even holo sight scopes! What works for you depends on your hunting style. For me, I like the single pin, bottom mount, 1 5/8 scope with a good hood and a fiber optic pin in .010 size, green.

But this is only one of hundreds of configurations!

Now let's talk about multiple pin scopes. The name of this thread is Single Vs. Multiple pin sights, but I only used that because it is still common to call movable pin sights "single pin". The fact is, there are numerous models of "Multiple Pin Movable Sights" on the market now. These are specifically tailored for the hunters. You can have any number of fixed pins, say 20-30-40-50 and then have an index that lets you move the reference pin to anything in-between, below or above these yardages. It truly is the best of both worlds.

A word of caution here; one of the great benefits of a single pin movable sight is the uncluttered sight picture. Do yourself a favor, before you buy a multiple pin movable sight shoot a single pin first; you may be amazed at the difference it makes. I'm not saying one is better than the other, but give yourself a chance to see the difference before you buy.

Scope size
Size matters, just ask anyone! The larger the scope the larger your field of view, if that matters to you. I like a larger field of view for hunting and a smaller for target. The size of the scope will matter for your peep size; a larger peep needs a larger scope or the scope needs to be moved closer to the peep (remember what we said earlier about being more accurate the farther away the scope is from the peep?). This is important to have a large enough peep to allow for low light shooting so you need to match up the scope size to the peep size.

Pin Orientation
I like to shoot with one pin mounted to the bottom of the scope. In this configuration the pin 'leg' seems to disappear when I put the dot on the animal; maybe it blends with the leg or something, I don't know, but it works for me. I know guys who shoot with a single fiber dot and who shoot with the pin affixed to the top of the housing; whatever works for you.

Scope Ring
The side that faces the shooter is called the scope ring or shooter ring. On many scopes this is a threaded ring and can be sued to hold any number of accessory rings. I like to have a nice colorful ring of Chartreuse on my shooter ring; some use white, green, yellow, orange, red the list goes on and on. Whatever color works for you use it; the contrasting color will help to quickly center the scope in the peep and keep it there.

Lights
Our eyes work by processing light waves as they bounce and refract off of and through objects; our brains process this information and turn it into a visual spectrum that we can then reference. Light plays an important role in how we shoot. Other than the obvious fact that light is needed in low light or dark conditions it can also help us be more accurate in the broad daylight.

If we are dependent on light for all this to work then it is logical that the changing light also can play tricks on our brains. A morning sun is different than an afternoon sun in intensity and angle; this could be causing accuracy decay and we don't even know it! An easy way to correct for varying light conditions is to have alight on all the time that never varies! A good hood is required for this to work properly and a good light; but if used correctly this could take away those days when you just can't seem to get far enough to the left to get that bullseye. Remember, if you are switching to get the most accuracy you can don't just dismiss stuff like this; it may not work for you but, you should at least consider it if you are striving to be as accurate as you can.

Clarifiers
Clarifiers are lenses attached to the scope house on the front of the scope (the side away from the shooter). They help to clarify the target and many times shooters use them to magnify the target. If you are wanting to try this I would suggest starting with a small power lens and working your way up in power. If you start with a 4x lens you may start to suffer from target panic (due to the large perception of movement) and no one wants that. Most hunters are okay with a 2x lens, they just need a little something to clear up the target. There are also companies, like Classic Archery that will grind your scope lens to your prescription if you wear glasses' pretty cool eh?

While we are talking about clarifiers let's touch on verifiers. If you are having trouble with blurry pins you need a verifier; this is a small lens that goes in the peep sight to help clear up the fuzzy pin. Fuzzy pin verifier, fuzzy target clarifier. You can not use a clarifier and a verifier together and if you have an astigmatism you may not be able to use a verifier; some can, some can't. I am in the can't category.

Everything else is pretty common knowledge; so let's talk specific brands, if ya want.
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Old 12-29-2015, 03:48 PM   #8
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In recent history the two sights I have used are the Axcel Sight and the Spot Hogg.

I have use the Axcel for target and love the X-41 scope; it has a nifty built-in torque indicator.

http://www.axcelsights.com/index.html

My favorite hunting sight is the Spot Hogg Hogg Father; I have used many of the Spot Hogg sights over the years and they are built tough, and heavy!

http://spot-hogg.com/sights/

I like the single pin configuration.

Classic Archery has many scope options and accessories, plus they have the best lenses hands down. These are quality glass Zeiss lenses, not plastic. They also now have their own sights! Never used the sights but if they are to the same quality that the scopes are then they will be lights out fantastic.

http://www.classicarchery.com/default.asp

What about weight?
I like weight (more correctly mass); weight does many things for the archer. Mass helps to hold steady better, absorbs more vibration (thereby dampening sound) and have a better follow through. I like my bows full tilt to be about 7.5pounds give or take. Now, I know everyone on the boards spends all their time in Colorado lugging their bows after Elk for 20 miles a day every year; whatever. I would rather have a pound on my bow and leave something else out of my pack; If accuracy is paramount then mass is your friend. I'm not advocating you carry around a 20 pound bow, but let's be sensible, you could loose a few pounds off of your waistline and make a bigger difference than trying to shave 3 ounces off of your sights; well, I could anyway.
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Old 12-29-2015, 03:57 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shane View Post
I've been thinking about switching to a 3-pin slider. I'm thinking that would give me the best of both worlds.... Fixed pin simplicity for 20-30-40 yards, and then adjustable bottom pin for longer shots (like if I was ever hunting elk spot and stalk and wanted to shoot 50-75 yards).
You can also use the reference pin for gap shooting; like at 25, 35 or 45 yards. The reference pin isn't just for shooting past your fixed pin range, but for ANY range on the tape; even very close which could come in handy for a 3D tournament.

But yes, it would give you the best of both worlds and they are gaining in popularity.
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Old 12-29-2015, 04:04 PM   #10
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Spot Hogg, Hogg Father, Dovetail mount, long bar.


Last edited by Rat; 12-29-2015 at 04:11 PM..
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Old 12-29-2015, 04:06 PM   #11
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Rear mounted dial, HHA Sports, Optimizer Ultra


Last edited by Rat; 12-29-2015 at 04:16 PM..
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Old 12-29-2015, 04:07 PM   #12
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I switched to a single, HHA , and couldn't be happier ! I like having one pin to worry about, or see through. It has helped me shrink groups down and be far more confident when it's time to take the shot.
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Old 12-29-2015, 04:09 PM   #13
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Sight Tape inboard, Black Gold, Ascent Verdict.

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Old 12-29-2015, 04:10 PM   #14
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Copper John, Mark IV, Slider

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Old 12-29-2015, 04:10 PM   #15
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Copper John, Mark IV, Slider, Multi Pin.

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Old 12-29-2015, 04:33 PM   #16
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Started the season with an HHA single pin slider. Late this season I decided to go with a multi-pin CBE Tek Hybrid Pro. The HHA was fine when you know the range you're going to be shooting at (I took my buck with it early October), but I like the simplicity of the multi-pin when a shot may appear at various ranges. The multi-pin with a slider or wheel adjustment is sort of the best of both worlds.

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Old 12-29-2015, 07:12 PM   #17
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Very nice post sir
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Old 12-29-2015, 08:54 PM   #18
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Holy crap rat. Was you off today. Great write up.
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Old 12-29-2015, 09:01 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fergeris View Post
Very nice post sir
7hanks, but I'm no authority; I hope others will chime in with their thoughts, observations and opinions.
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Old 12-29-2015, 09:02 PM   #20
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I'm shooting the hha kingpin an man alot of the pros that you posted is the reason I started shooting this sight love it.
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Old 12-29-2015, 09:08 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enewman View Post
Holy crap rat. Was you off today. Great write up.
LOL, I wasn't off but I did get a little bored a few times; slow season for us ya know!
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Old 12-30-2015, 11:29 PM   #22
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Default The definitive Single Vs. Multiple Pin thread.



You can't give me an HHA. I've owned 3. I've been shooting sliders exactly 20 years now. I've owned a pile of em. MBG is my all time fave and I can put a regular quiver mount on my bow just like a fixed pin sight accepts or a 2 piece bow mounted quiver.
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Old 12-30-2015, 11:41 PM   #23
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Why didn't you like hha again I forgot
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Old 12-30-2015, 11:42 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fergeris View Post
Why didn't you like hha again I forgot

They all 3 rattled and I couldn't get em to stop. I have never shot the Kingpin tho. It looks better built.
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Old 12-30-2015, 11:43 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ragin' View Post
They all 3 rattled and I couldn't get em to stop. I have never shot the Kingpin tho. It looks better built.
It is alot better it did Rattle at first but the set screws were just a Lil loose I tightened them an it's very very quiet
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Old 12-30-2015, 11:46 PM   #26
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Default The definitive Single Vs. Multiple Pin thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fergeris View Post
It is alot better it did Rattle at first but the set screws were just a Lil loose I tightened them an it's very very quiet

It's slicker looking than a Hogg Father. Hogg Father was nice n all but it was just too much I think. I like the MGB better than I did it. The fiber on this I shoot now is a bit brighter than my Hogg Father was also.
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Old 12-30-2015, 11:47 PM   #27
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I was torn between the kingpin an the hogg father took me awhile to choose
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Old 12-31-2015, 10:05 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fergeris View Post
I was torn between the kingpin an the hogg father took me awhile to choose
What made you decide on the Kingpin?
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Old 12-31-2015, 10:10 AM   #29
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I had the regular optimizer but wanted to go to a sight that allowed me to shoot 100 yards. I was going to switch to the hogg father but then the king pin came out an it's the same set up but able to shoot further an it's easy to sight in. Took me maybe 20 mins.
I hadn't looked at the hogg father an didn't know how they setup.
I really like the dove tail as well. The other reason I was going to switch.
An so far the customer service has been great from hha.
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Old 12-31-2015, 12:18 PM   #30
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I hafta say I like the lighted sight tape. I don't think I have ever needed it, but it is cool to have.
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Old 12-31-2015, 12:22 PM   #31
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I started out with a single pin and didn't like it. My hunting situations were where you never knew what distance they would come out. Having to range and adjust on the fly was no fun. Went with multi pin and never went back, better results for me.
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Old 12-31-2015, 12:27 PM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThwackAttack View Post
I started out with a single pin and didn't like it. My hunting situations were where you never knew what distance they would come out. Having to range and adjust on the fly was no fun. Went with multi pin and never went back, better results for me.
That is where the multi-pin slider comes in handy.

Excellent info Rat.
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Old 12-31-2015, 01:08 PM   #33
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I have he tried the light yet
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Old 12-31-2015, 07:49 PM   #34
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Just bought the axcel accutouch carbon slider with the x41 scope ring. This will be my first single pin sight. Your thoughts on this sight?
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Old 01-01-2016, 02:30 AM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by droptine1 View Post
Just bought the axcel accutouch carbon slider with the x41 scope ring. This will be my first single pin sight. Your thoughts on this sight?
Axcel builds one of the best sights in the industry, and I love the x41 scope. Many top tournament shooters use Axcel sights.

Make sure when you set the third axis you are torque fee, this way the red ring will show you when you are torquing the bow.

It will be a heck of a good shooter for ya!
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Old 01-01-2016, 10:17 AM   #36
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Excellent thread; thanks for taking the time to put it together

I've been shooting a single pin slider for 5 years, and wouldn't consider going back to a multi-pin sight again.
Most of my hunting is from a stand, and I usually set it at 25 yds, but I like the flexibility, to set it to whatever distance, I want to shoot at.
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Old 01-01-2016, 10:29 AM   #37
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I just ordered a new kingpin on a dovetail for my new bow setup, gonna be my first single pin. I am switching from a 5 pin axcel on a dovetail, mainly because I dont like focusing on 1/5 I feel like having 1 pin on the exact yardage is the way to go, and it far outweighs the possibility of missing an opportunity because you need to adjust yardage. I am also getting a new sight for my wifes bow and I feel like she would do better with a single pin because the ability to dial down the yard instead of gapping pins or holding high/low with her slower fps I feel like thats a great advantage. She is hesitant because its a foreign concept to her. Most likely going to try to put one on her bow at a shop and see how she feels about it. On multi pin adjustable sights, say its 3 pins. you set a 20-30-40 and then for yardages beyond that the tape marks yardages for your top pin? or does only the bottom pin move?
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Old 01-01-2016, 10:47 AM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Saltej_77 View Post
I just ordered a new kingpin on a dovetail for my new bow setup, gonna be my first single pin. I am switching from a 5 pin axcel on a dovetail, mainly because I dont like focusing on 1/5 I feel like having 1 pin on the exact yardage is the way to go, and it far outweighs the possibility of missing an opportunity because you need to adjust yardage. I am also getting a new sight for my wifes bow and I feel like she would do better with a single pin because the ability to dial down the yard instead of gapping pins or holding high/low with her slower fps I feel like thats a great advantage. She is hesitant because its a foreign concept to her. Most likely going to try to put one on her bow at a shop and see how she feels about it. On multi pin adjustable sights, say its 3 pins. you set a 20-30-40 and then for yardages beyond that the tape marks yardages for your top pin? or does only the bottom pin move?

It won't cost you any shot ops. In 20 years only twice once I drew did something else step out that I wanted to shoot. And then I shot em and killed em. This coming off season take a lot of time leaving your sight set at 20 yards (or 25 if you prefer) and shooting out to 40. I leave mine at 20 all the time and am able to drill targets out to 40 easy. I don't really work off inches. I started using a 3-D target years ago to prentice that. If my sight is set on 20 and something I wasn't to shoot steps out at 35 it's just automatic to put the pin on the animal where I need it to to drop the arrow where it's supposed to go. Different speeds and FOC will vary in trajectory. Just practice with your set up. It won't take you long to figure it out. And the more you practice it it will get more automatic. Now if there is let's say a hog at 40 yards yes I'll adjust my pin. But if there is some reason I can't, not enough time etc I'll leave it at 20 and Killem. The key to it is confidence in it. Which personally I believe is the number 1 factor in shooting a bow. I know some will argue form etc. But if your form etc is perfect, but in your mind you're unsure of your shot. You're prolly gonna miss! Lol.
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Old 01-01-2016, 11:57 AM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Saltej_77 View Post
...On multi pin adjustable sights, say its 3 pins. you set a 20-30-40 and then for yardages beyond that the tape marks yardages for your top pin? or does only the bottom pin move?
On a multi-pin slider all the pins move, but only one is the reference pin.
You have your three pins set, 20-30-40 and the bottom pin is the reference pin. This means that when using the sight as a fixed pin sight the sight pointer will be set to 40 yards, we call this the 'home position'; this way all the pins will hit 20-30-40 respectively.

Once you move the wheel, whatever yardage the pointer is on is for the BOTTOM pin; ANY yardage, not just yardage beyond 40 yards (your longest fixed pin). If you set the pointer to 25 yards your bottom pin will be on at 25 yards. The bottom pin is the reference pin.

The sight can be set up to have any pin be the reference pin but most people like to use the bottom pin, but the top pin can be used just as easily.

Again, all the pins move, but once the sight is moved from the 'home position' only the reference pin is used.

1) The 'Home Position' is where the pointer is set on the tape so the fixed pins are used at their pre-determined yardages.

2) Once moved from the 'home position' ONLY the reference pin is used.

3) The reference pin can be any pin you choose, most choose the bottom pin (to get the most distance) but it can just as easily be the top pin.

4) The reference pin can be used for any distance on the dial, not just yardages longer than the longest fixed pin. IE, 25 yards, 35 yards etc. this eliminates gap shooting for ever!

And Ragin' is right, archery is one huge mind game;confidence is key. So the first time you forget to move the dial and shoot a foot over the target, just laugh it off and move on!

Last edited by Rat; 01-01-2016 at 12:03 PM..
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Old 01-01-2016, 12:14 PM   #40
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Watch this video; at about the three minute mark he explains setting up the sight tape for the reference pin and how it works. This is a Spot Hogg video but the same principle applies to all sliders.

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Old 01-25-2016, 04:08 PM   #41
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A review of the Fast Eddie XL by Spot Hogg; reviewed by Loneaggie.

Spot Hogg Fast Eddie XL Review by Loneaggie
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Old 01-25-2016, 08:56 PM   #42
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Somewhere in this thread it may have been mentioned, but I may have missed it.
Keep in mind, that when using a moveable site, whether single pin, or multi pin, once the housing is moved, your anchor will have to move to adjust.
(usually you will have to relax off the string slightly, as most times you will be using the moveable for longer distances)
Same as centering pins in a multi pin housing.
With a fixed, multi pin housing, once you are aligned, (assuming your peep size fits the housing) you never have to "float" your anchor.
Simply align peep with housing, put desired pin on target.
In no way trying to detract from the moveable pin advantage, just making sure all pros and cons are discussed.
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Old 01-25-2016, 09:02 PM   #43
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Tagged to read later.
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Old 01-25-2016, 10:22 PM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rat View Post
On a multi-pin slider all the pins move, but only one is the reference pin.
You have your three pins set, 20-30-40 and the bottom pin is the reference pin. This means that when using the sight as a fixed pin sight the sight pointer will be set to 40 yards, we call this the 'home position'; this way all the pins will hit 20-30-40 respectively.

Once you move the wheel, whatever yardage the pointer is on is for the BOTTOM pin; ANY yardage, not just yardage beyond 40 yards (your longest fixed pin). If you set the pointer to 25 yards your bottom pin will be on at 25 yards. The bottom pin is the reference pin.

The sight can be set up to have any pin be the reference pin but most people like to use the bottom pin, but the top pin can be used just as easily.

Again, all the pins move, but once the sight is moved from the 'home position' only the reference pin is used.

1) The 'Home Position' is where the pointer is set on the tape so the fixed pins are used at their pre-determined yardages.

2) Once moved from the 'home position' ONLY the reference pin is used.

3) The reference pin can be any pin you choose, most choose the bottom pin (to get the most distance) but it can just as easily be the top pin.

4) The reference pin can be used for any distance on the dial, not just yardages longer than the longest fixed pin. IE, 25 yards, 35 yards etc. this eliminates gap shooting for ever!

And Ragin' is right, archery is one huge mind game;confidence is key. So the first time you forget to move the dial and shoot a foot over the target, just laugh it off and move on!
On a multi pin slider like the hogg father, if you have your reference pin set to 40, what is the max distance you would be able to sight that pin in at for single pin use? Hope that makes sense.
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Old 01-25-2016, 11:08 PM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EastTx View Post
On a multi pin slider like the hogg father, if you have your reference pin set to 40, what is the max distance you would be able to sight that pin in at for single pin use? Hope that makes sense.
Depends on the bow and how fast it is shooting. My 10 year old tribute will run out to about 80 yards before the broadhead hits the housing when I draw; but I also shoot a large (hunting), hooded scope. I could definitely get to 90 and maybe 100 with a smaller (target) scope.

I know one shooter who gets to 140 with his target set up, he shoots a small scope though. I think most modern bows will do 100 easily and probably slightly more.
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Old 01-25-2016, 11:22 PM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rocky View Post
Somewhere in this thread it may have been mentioned, but I may have missed it.
Keep in mind, that when using a moveable site, whether single pin, or multi pin, once the housing is moved, your anchor will have to move to adjust.
(usually you will have to relax off the string slightly, as most times you will be using the moveable for longer distances)
Same as centering pins in a multi pin housing.
With a fixed, multi pin housing, once you are aligned, (assuming your peep size fits the housing) you never have to "float" your anchor.
Simply align peep with housing, put desired pin on target.
In no way trying to detract from the moveable pin advantage, just making sure all pros and cons are discussed.
Good point Rocky. There are several ways to go about getting a consistent anchor.

Set your anchor at the most common distance you shoot, like 20 yards, then adjust for the longer distances. This has the advantage of only needing to move the anchor point down, but the distance the anchor needs to move will be greater than method two below.

Set your anchor for the mid-range of the sight, then move up our down when the housing moves. This has the advantage of not moving the anchor much, only small moves when compared to the first method; but the anchor will move both up and down.

We're not talking inches here, but millimeters, maybe centimeters at most.
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Old 01-26-2016, 10:12 AM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rat View Post
On a multi-pin slider all the pins move, but only one is the reference pin.
You have your three pins set, 20-30-40 and the bottom pin is the reference pin. This means that when using the sight as a fixed pin sight the sight pointer will be set to 40 yards, we call this the 'home position'; this way all the pins will hit 20-30-40 respectively.

Once you move the wheel, whatever yardage the pointer is on is for the BOTTOM pin; ANY yardage, not just yardage beyond 40 yards (your longest fixed pin). If you set the pointer to 25 yards your bottom pin will be on at 25 yards. The bottom pin is the reference pin.

The sight can be set up to have any pin be the reference pin but most people like to use the bottom pin, but the top pin can be used just as easily.

Again, all the pins move, but once the sight is moved from the 'home position' only the reference pin is used.

1) The 'Home Position' is where the pointer is set on the tape so the fixed pins are used at their pre-determined yardages.

2) Once moved from the 'home position' ONLY the reference pin is used.

3) The reference pin can be any pin you choose, most choose the bottom pin (to get the most distance) but it can just as easily be the top pin.

4) The reference pin can be used for any distance on the dial, not just yardages longer than the longest fixed pin. IE, 25 yards, 35 yards etc. this eliminates gap shooting for ever!

And Ragin' is right, archery is one huge mind game;confidence is key. So the first time you forget to move the dial and shoot a foot over the target, just laugh it off and move on!
Just for a little more clarity of those that might think the pins themselves are moving, the whole site housing moves when you adjust yardage with the wheel. The pins themselves are afixed to the housing, and when you make adjustments with the wheel, the whole housing moves, not the individual pins within the housing. After you get your pins set up at your yardages, they stay in place. Whichever pin you decide to use as your 'floater' is the pin you use to shoot when you make yardage adjustments with the wheel.
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