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-   -   Seeking a little professional opinion (https://discussions.texasbowhunter.com/forums/showthread.php?t=689080)

Rwc 04-12-2018 11:44 AM

Seeking a little professional opinion
 
Let me start by saying, I have never owned or used a DSLR camera, but I want one……….ha , always been a point and shoot type of guy.

I understand after reading multiple reviews and opinion blogs that camera’s to some or like bow’s are to others…….lots of very strong opinions verses models and brands. But there are many of you on the green screen that take photos that just blow me away. So here I am asking:

In your opinion, what manufacture and model of camera would be a good entry level camera that I could learn and grow with? I will be using it mainly for action (Brecks sports) shots and still images while hunting. I would like the option of lenses that would give me the ability to zoom in on objects out to a few hundred yards. I would like to have the option of also using it in place of my video recorder when needed. I think I would like a function to use a remote to trigger and help with delayed shutter applications along with capturing still images. Also would prefer multiple batteries.

My budget is approximately $750.00 but I think I can beat that if the Canon Rebel T6, Nikon D3400 or comparable will fit my bill? I am liking the looks of the bundle packages offered on Amazon and EBay..etc., but not sure that I am not missing something.

Thanks a million in advance for all of your professional opinions and will check back later.

Again thanks and God Bless

Rwc

sportsman 04-12-2018 01:30 PM

Seeking a little professional opinion
 
The problem you’ll run into on the “several hundred yard shots” is it takes a big zoom to achieve that. My 70-200mm 2.8 still requires cropping from my already cropped camera (Canon 80D). Depending on the sports (inside, outside, day/night) you’ll have to decide on a lens that’ll fit your needs. There is not a one lens fits all.
I was in the same boat as you several years ago. I bought a canon t3i kit from amazon that included lots of stuff and 2 lenses. The kit lenses got me started. I soon learned my kit lenses were holding me back. I then upgraded to L series lenses. Then my camera was upgraded last year. I’m still on a crop Camera simply because for me and what I shoot & lenses I already owned it’s just not time for a full frame camera.


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Pedernal 04-12-2018 01:41 PM

In the same boat and have been looking at the Nikon coolpix models. They have 500, 700 and 900 models that can zoom in significantly.

In for the info from the pros on TBH

Rwc 04-12-2018 01:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sportsman (Post 13310086)
The problem you’ll run into on the “several hundred yard shots” is it takes a big zoom to achieve that. My 70-200mm 2.8 still requires cropping from my already cropped camera (Canon 80D). Depending on the sports (inside, outside, day/night) you’ll have to decide on a lens that’ll fit your needs. There is not a one lens fits all.
I was in the same boat as you several years ago. I bought a canon t3i kit from amazon that included lots of stuff and 2 lenses. The kit lenses got me started. I soon learned my kit lenses were holding me back. I then upgraded to L series lenses. Then my camera was upgraded last year. I’m still on a crop Camera simply because for me and what I shoot & lenses I already owned it’s just not time for a full frame camera.


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Appreciate it. Would the two cameras I listed be considered cropped cameras?

Rwc

sportsman 04-12-2018 01:51 PM

I don’t know anything about Nikon, but the t6 is. If you didn’t know, the crop is 1.61. So in zoom (if your at 70mm) you’d multiply 70x1.61 and the actual zoom is 112.7. This helps at max zoom say 200x1.61=322. Where the crop hurts you is when you need less zoom for a multiple of reason (night photography/landscapes/more light. The more you zoom the more light it takes.


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Rwc 04-12-2018 01:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sportsman (Post 13310148)
I don’t know anything about Nikon, but the t6 is. If you didn’t know, the crop is 1.61. So in zoom (if your at 70mm) you’d multiply 70x1.61 and the actual zoom is 112.7. This helps at max zoom say 200x1.61=322. Where the crop hurts you is when you need less zoom for a multiple of reason (night photography/landscapes/more light. The more you zoom the more light it takes.


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Understood, and appreciate the quick response. While I have you...ha ha. Would there be merit in just finding a good deal on the body of the camera I decide on then shopping around for better lenses instead of buying a package deal?



Rwc

sportsman 04-12-2018 01:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rwc (Post 13310156)
Understood, and appreciate the quick response. While I have you...ha ha. Would there be merit in just finding a good deal on the body of the camera I decide on then shopping around for better lenses instead of buying a package deal?







Rwc



Absolutely! If I had it to do over that’s what I would have done. The problem you run into (like I did) is my primary reason was for my kids sports and wildlife. Then I found night photography, then portraits, and now my wife’s realty photos. And the deeper I get into photography, I’m sure I’ll find a need for another lens and keep going.


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Shane 04-12-2018 02:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rwc (Post 13310156)
Understood, and appreciate the quick response. While I have you...ha ha. Would there be merit in just finding a good deal on the body of the camera I decide on then shopping around for better lenses instead of buying a package deal?



Rwc

Yes. But better lenses are not cheap. You need at least 400mm, if not 600mm to get anything like what you're probably hoping for at "several hundred yards". Canon's quality lenses at that range are several thousand dollars. You can find a 600mm Sigma or Tamron or some other cheaper brand lens that are still pretty good for around $1,500 - $2,000.

Video functionality on a DSLR is not as simple as on a regular video camera. On a DSLR, the camera won't autofocus and keep tracking focus on a subject that is moving around. It's more of a manual focus process with DSLR video. The average person wanting to record video is MUCH better off using a digital video camera rather than a DSLR, in my opinion.

Rwc 04-12-2018 02:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Shane (Post 13310220)
Yes. But better lenses are not cheap. You need at least 400mm, if not 600mm to get anything like what you're probably hoping for at "several hundred yards". Canon's quality lenses at that range are several thousand dollars. You can find a 600mm Sigma or Tamron or some other cheaper brand lens that are still pretty good for around $1,500 - $2,000.

Video functionality on a DSLR is not as simple as on a regular video camera. On a DSLR, the camera won't autofocus and keep tracking focus on a subject that is moving around. It's more of a manual focus process with DSLR video. The average person wanting to record video is MUCH better off using a digital video camera rather than a DSLR, in my opinion.

Appreciate the knowledge. I might have to re-analyze my thinking; the very reason I posted here.

Rwc

Shane 04-12-2018 04:08 PM

You can go to a mirrorless camera body and get better video autofocus performance, but they ain't cheap, and the lens cost is still the same as with regular DSLRs. The image quality of the video on these cameras is awesome, and there's some creative things you can do with interchangeable lenses and such. For pros, it's worth the expense and hassle. But if you just want to easily shoot some decent video, stick with a video camera. Get a DSLR for still images and have fun.

dcbrown 04-12-2018 04:38 PM

I have Nikon D5300 and D7000 bodies, both are cropped sensors. They do pretty well for starting out. After you get started, if you really get serious about photography, you'll form a better idea about what you want. I prefer the Nikon (that is what I shoot), but either Nikon or Canon will do a fairly good job. It is like apples and oranges, it is all in what you come to prefer. I started with a Canon and switched to Nikon.

ATX Tyler 04-12-2018 08:52 PM

I'd stay away from the big bundles on Amazon and Ebay. Most of the "extras" that they come with (outside of the body and OEM kit lens) are complete crap. I'm a Canon guy, but Nikon is great too. It's like Chevy vs. Ford vs. Dodge.

I wouldn't be too afraid to buy used as well if you want to stretch your budget. I literally have an entire kit of used gear, and it all looks and functions like a new product. Like others have noted, the lenses are where things will begin to get expensive with a DSLR. If you want something with decent range, I'd recommend a Canon body with a 55-250 STM lens on it. That is a pretty good valued kit lens that will give you some reach to start out.

Rwc 04-13-2018 08:21 AM

I appreciate all of your advice / opinions. I believe I am going to take the advice and start looking for a good body and then add a good lens. Probably going to start by looking at some refurbished / used bodies and maybe a pawn shop or two.

Again thanks for taking the time to respond.

Rwc

FriscoAg 04-13-2018 09:14 AM

I have an 80D Body for sale. Feel free to PM with any questions you may have and I'll do my best to answer them for you. best of luck!

http://discussions.texasbowhunter.co...d.php?t=681701

Havalon 04-20-2018 02:22 AM

Nikon D90 is an exceptional unit for the money.

ezypikns 04-26-2018 04:06 PM

Don't Overlook A Good Used Body......or lens.
 
Keh Camera is a reputable dealer, and Roberts Camera out of Indiana has a used camera/lens link on their website. I haven't been disappointed doing business with them.

You can't beat the warranty on a new camera, but buying used might be an answer.

If you do a little research, you'll find some good deals on bodies and lenses whose model was discontinued a few years ago. It's certainly true that you'll find the newest innovations on the newest equipment, but there are plenty of quality older bodies and lenses out there.

Do LOTS of research online before you buy.


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