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Old 08-27-2008, 10:28 PM   #1
ruffrider
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Default planting australian winter peas?

I've got the ground disced and am going to drag it tomorrow. should the peas be seeded prior to draggin so that they are covered. or drug and then pack the seeds. Still have quite a bit of ground moisture and want to get them in as I'm running out of time with upcoming surgery, and I hate asking someone else for help.

also red vs white clover. $1.37 lb on red $3.57 lb for white. is it worth 2 bucks on the difference of clover. will be planted with oats/brassica/ and chicory mix.

and wow... picked up some kale and rape seed 8.87 a pound. thank goodness a lb of those lil seeds goes a long way
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Old 08-27-2008, 11:41 PM   #2
Dejashoot
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Last week when asking some of the same questions, I was told to:
1. Disk
2. Seed
3. Use a roller

Didn't have a roller so I ran over all of it with the tractor's tires. Farmer said that was just as good.

Hope this helps - I'm no expert, just passing on what I heard.

I used just about everyting you have listed. Winter peas, clover, chickory, wheat and oats. I have a thread somewhere on here this week that has pictures of some my planted plots.
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Old 08-27-2008, 11:45 PM   #3
Jaspro
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Just as Dejashooter said do.

1. Disk
2. Seed
3. Use a roller

If you don't have a roller take you a piece of chain link fence and nail a heavy board to one end of it and drag it. Anything to get some dirt over the seed. Deisel is too high to run all over it with the tractor tire.
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Old 08-28-2008, 10:14 AM   #4
bltiger
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I'm new at this so if you don't mind ruffrider I'd like to piggyback on the thread real quick. I just got done mowing my plots, I'm going to get a tiller out and do a good one over on the plots first. Then I'm going to go back and disk up the plots. So do you fertilizer when you plant or after you plant?

Also when you say "seed" do you mean broadcast the seeds or are people using drills to plant? I'm sure most Average Joe's don't have seed drills but I'm just making sure!
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Old 08-28-2008, 10:18 AM   #5
Moose
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Make sure you innoculate the peas--- or any legume for that matter
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Old 08-28-2008, 10:24 AM   #6
bowhuntntxn
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i would not suggest planting chickory or any kale. get some turnip seeds in the ground with your peas, and you will have a very high protein source. the other stuff will be really tall and over run your beneficial plantings.
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Old 08-28-2008, 10:56 AM   #7
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I hope you have better luck with that stuff than we did. Our rancher planted about 100 acres of that stuff a couple of years ago. It came up fine and looked great to me, but the deer walked right across it to get to the neighbors wheat field on the other side. Acted like they couldn't care less about it.

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Old 08-28-2008, 10:59 AM   #8
bltiger
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Going to mix the peas with either oats/wheat so hopefully they will like something I put out Trailboss!
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Old 08-28-2008, 11:01 AM   #9
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Acutally, now that I think about it - the stuff the rancher planted was Austrian winter peas. Don't know about Austrailian winter peas. That may be something totally different.

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Old 08-28-2008, 12:17 PM   #10
dbaio1
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ruffrider

we have been planting aust winter peas for about 10 yrs and we always chop, seed and then drag. The peas need to be covered good, about 1" is the best we have found.

We do mix plots as well as individual. If you have the space try a straight pea patch they work well, come back and do iron clay or cow peas in the spring.

Our mix is:
Buck Forage Oats,
Winter Wheat
White and red clover
Alyce clover
chicory
rape
purple top turnips

Good luck we are planting on Sept 15 and dancing for the rain gods
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Old 08-28-2008, 12:32 PM   #11
dbaio1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bltiger View Post
I'm new at this so if you don't mind ruffrider I'd like to piggyback on the thread real quick. I just got done mowing my plots, I'm going to get a tiller out and do a good one over on the plots first. Then I'm going to go back and disk up the plots. So do you fertilizer when you plant or after you plant?

Also when you say "seed" do you mean broadcast the seeds or are people using drills to plant? I'm sure most Average Joe's don't have seed drills but I'm just making sure!
bltiger

if you have a drill that would work great, we have always broadcast because that is all we have and it works perfectly fine.

if you have not tested your soil, you should. its not expensive at all and the do it yourself kits are better than not testing. depending on your area you may require lime as we do. if you put ferltizer out and the ph is not right your wasting money on the fertilizer and the seed really.

food plots need to taste right not just grow. ph and nitrogen levels are the key. also keep in mind it takes lime a good 6 months to work, we use pelletized slow release lime.

we have always broadcast lime/ferilizer/seed then drag it all at once.

good luck guys
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Old 08-28-2008, 12:53 PM   #12
Brannon74
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I plant a wheat, triticale, oat, winter pea, clover, rape mix for fall plots. If you get your plot disced down and have good subsoil moisture then I recommned drilling your wheat, oats, winter peas and then broadcasting your clover, rape, chickory, seeds on top. then drag soil over the top. If you don't have a drill available then broadcast all you seed, but you won't get it up until you get a rain. I planted mine last weekend. I use an old drill I bought from a farmer that has the hand lever so i can pull it behind my pickup and don't have to have the tractor to plant.
On another note I planted alfalfa and white clover plot on another place last fall. That plot looks great and if far better than any plot I have. It is in a good soil though. I sprayed it in april and again in june with a product called select to control weeds. I would highly recommended trying that anywhere where you have good soil. W/ weed control I should get 3-5 years out of that plot and the spraying is by far cheaper and easier than planting a new plot.
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Old 08-28-2008, 01:06 PM   #13
Brannon74
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here is some pics from my plots last year.





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Old 08-28-2008, 01:14 PM   #14
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Discing will dry your soil completely. I would not bust the ground until I was ready to plant.
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Old 08-28-2008, 05:34 PM   #15
bltiger
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dbaio1@yahoo.com View Post
bltiger

if you have a drill that would work great, we have always broadcast because that is all we have and it works perfectly fine.

if you have not tested your soil, you should. its not expensive at all and the do it yourself kits are better than not testing. depending on your area you may require lime as we do. if you put ferltizer out and the ph is not right your wasting money on the fertilizer and the seed really.

food plots need to taste right not just grow. ph and nitrogen levels are the key. also keep in mind it takes lime a good 6 months to work, we use pelletized slow release lime.

we have always broadcast lime/ferilizer/seed then drag it all at once.

good luck guys
Thank you for the info everyone, good stuff guys! I have a local farmer who is going to help me with the pH testing of the soil!
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