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Old 04-26-2011, 09:59 AM   #1
deerslay3r
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Default how to get rid of hydrilla?

my dad has a stock tank thats about an acre and has a major problem with hydrilla. we have tried the chemicals and they work great but only temporarily...we have thought about carp or tilapia? any advice/experience would be greatly appreciated.
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Old 04-26-2011, 10:03 AM   #2
JTeLarkin08
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Why would you want to get rid of it???
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Old 04-26-2011, 10:03 AM   #3
elliscountyhog
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I have the exact same problem. I am thinking of just going in and start pulling it myself
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Old 04-26-2011, 10:03 AM   #4
canny
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Triploid grass carp will take care of hydrilla problem, however make sure to go throught the proper permits to acquire them. If you haven't already check out www.aquaplant.tamu.edu for control measures for hydrilla.
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Old 04-26-2011, 10:20 AM   #5
Saxet Nomad
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If I'm not mistaken, the chemicals will work with repeated applications over time.
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Old 04-26-2011, 10:23 AM   #6
deerslay3r
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because it is unfishable.....we have been pullin the stuff out by hand for the last few years and it just seems to come back stronger. the regulated carp that wont breed can be pretty pricey...i have also heard that people will come out and inspect? dont really want to deal with bureaucrat bull.
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Old 04-26-2011, 10:40 AM   #7
canny
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because it is unfishable.....we have been pullin the stuff out by hand for the last few years and it just seems to come back stronger. the regulated carp that wont breed can be pretty pricey...i have also heard that people will come out and inspect? dont really want to deal with bureaucrat bull.
Well not to be blunt but in this case you cant have your cake and eat it too. There are 3 ways to control hydrilla, manual, biological, and chemical. Manual controls such as raking and pulling can work but take note that hydrilla can resprout through fragments so you have to ensure that all the pieces are removed from the pond. Chemical treatments will work over time, but if your pond is overgrown like you say it is then you need to treat it in sections to keep from depleting your oxygen and killing your fish. Then biological, the only biological control for hydrilla is triploid grass carp. Yes these are by permit only and may be pricey (I have no clue on price). I would imagine that TPWD may inspect your pond, primarily to ensure that they cannot escape.
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Old 04-26-2011, 10:56 AM   #8
deerslay3r
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might have to just break down and buy some...
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Old 04-26-2011, 10:58 AM   #9
Dirtymike
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carp double as a fun bow fishing target so...
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Old 04-26-2011, 11:00 AM   #10
Peacock
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Quote:
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Well not to be blunt but in this case you cant have your cake and eat it too. There are 3 ways to control hydrilla, manual, biological, and chemical. Manual controls such as raking and pulling can work but take note that hydrilla can resprout through fragments so you have to ensure that all the pieces are removed from the pond. Chemical treatments will work over time, but if your pond is overgrown like you say it is then you need to treat it in sections to keep from depleting your oxygen and killing your fish. Then biological, the only biological control for hydrilla is triploid grass carp. Yes these are by permit only and may be pricey (I have no clue on price). I would imagine that TPWD may inspect your pond, primarily to ensure that they cannot escape.
Last grass carp I bought were $8 a piece. That was 7 years ago.
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Old 04-26-2011, 11:21 AM   #11
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The carp are not expensive it is just a matter of filling out the correct paper work. Just remember that grass carp live between 5-7 years and can eat their body weight a day in vegetation. I have seen 50-60 pound grass carp before so that is a lot of vegetation gone. GC can ruin a lake or pond in no time if they are over stocked.
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Old 04-26-2011, 11:25 AM   #12
Ol Thumper
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I have some old school Karmex if your interested.
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Old 04-26-2011, 12:09 PM   #13
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Quote:
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Triploid grass carp will take care of hydrilla problem, however make sure to go throught the proper permits to acquire them. If you haven't already check out www.aquaplant.tamu.edu for control measures for hydrilla.
Grass carp are the best way--and trust me-you don't want tilapia in your tanks. Big mature grass carp are the strongest fish I've ever caught--stronger than reds. The Guadalupe had them when I lived on the river prior to the '98 flood, and we caught bunches of them. We used breadballs for bait, that had been dipped in the stinking mess of soured milo we kept on the dock to chum catfish. Hook one and it's like wrapping your line around a trailer hitch on a Corvette and having the driver put the hammer down.

Last edited by dustoffer; 04-26-2011 at 12:12 PM..
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Old 04-26-2011, 12:38 PM   #14
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The first go round that Lake Conroe had with the grass carp, it seems like they overstocked them. After a while, you couldn't find any vegitation in that lake. I remember seeing those giant carp beach themselves to grab a mouthful of grass off of the bank, then flop back in the water similar to the way a killer whale goes after seals on the shores.
Dave
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Old 04-26-2011, 12:56 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coon View Post
The first go round that Lake Conroe had with the grass carp, it seems like they overstocked them. After a while, you couldn't find any vegitation in that lake. I remember seeing those giant carp beach themselves to grab a mouthful of grass off of the bank, then flop back in the water similar to the way a killer whale goes after seals on the shores.
Dave
Early to mid 1980's the timeframe your referring to?
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Old 04-26-2011, 12:57 PM   #16
rubydog
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Nuclear explosion is the best way..
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Old 04-26-2011, 12:57 PM   #17
Ol Thumper
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Grass carp are the devil in a small lake.
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Old 04-26-2011, 01:50 PM   #18
deerslay3r
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nice mixed responses, but the sterile grass carp sound like the way to go even if its only for a few years or so, can always catch them if they start takin too much vegetation.
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Old 04-26-2011, 02:12 PM   #19
Ol Thumper
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You can poison it in late winter and you will have no need for a grass carp nightmare. Been their and done that, never again! TPW says 5 per acre WOW!!!!!!!!
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Old 04-26-2011, 02:13 PM   #20
JMG
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Just hope the carp are sterile. We put 5 in one of our little ponds a few years back. In 08, it dried up and there were 50-60 of them in there. In our big tank, the carp have seem to do the job. Just takes a while for them to get it under control.
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