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Old 09-02-2018, 08:09 PM   #1
txwhitetail
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Default Kitchen Knife Set

I've never really owned a quality kitchen knife set.

Any recommendations on a brand/model?


What price range should I be looking at?

Thanks
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Old 09-02-2018, 08:31 PM   #2
Strummer
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I like my shunís . Also have a wustoff set and Henkel. The shunís are my go to knives .


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Old 09-02-2018, 08:58 PM   #3
bmac
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Plenty of good ones to have just plan on hand washing. Iíve used wustoff but settled for Chicago cutlery as Iím to lazy to hand wash. I do have a few quality butchers I use from time to time in the drawer.


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Old 09-02-2018, 09:06 PM   #4
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Kramer
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Old 09-02-2018, 09:10 PM   #5
DarrellS
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Why do good knives have to be handwashed?

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Old 09-02-2018, 09:12 PM   #6
bmac
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DarrellS View Post
Why do good knives have to be handwashed?

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Dishwashers and the detergents are harsh on them and dull them quicker. You donít have to but why pay 300+ on a something to let it get as dull as a cheap set.


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Old 09-02-2018, 09:14 PM   #7
brokeno
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Walmart
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Old 09-02-2018, 09:22 PM   #8
Mudslinger
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Wustoff
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Old 09-02-2018, 09:26 PM   #9
Johnny Dangerr
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Cutco

Works well for years

Never sharpen another knife ever................
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Old 09-02-2018, 09:38 PM   #10
Jason Fry
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Custom

Iíve sharpened both Wusthof and Henkels for folks, and theyíre good knives.


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Old 09-02-2018, 09:52 PM   #11
Wampuscat
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I second the Henkel knives. Carbon steel is muy better than stainless steel. If you get wood handles, don’t soak them or use a dishwasher. The wood swells and the pins don’t. That’s why wood knife handles get loose.
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Old 09-02-2018, 10:03 PM   #12
lanceodom
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Cutco.
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Old 09-02-2018, 10:12 PM   #13
Johnny Dangerr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lanceodom View Post
Cutco.
Never bought a block.
Kind of picked them us as needed. Eight piece steak knife set. Butchers knife. Kitchen sheers. Pizza cutter.

Lifetime guarantee with free lifetime sharpening, and they last years. Kind of simple to the simple minded cook............

Man I need a new picture. That 12 yr old grump of a dog died in February.......
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Old 09-02-2018, 10:14 PM   #14
Fla Hunter
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I have a set of wusthof.
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Old 09-02-2018, 10:17 PM   #15
gatorgrizz27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Strummer View Post
I like my shun’s . Also have a wustoff set and Henkel. The shun’s are my go to knives .


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A man who knows what he’s talking about.

Japanese knives are typically lighter, harder, and sharper. German knives are typically heavier, softer, and won’t hold an edge for as long. It’s personal preference but a lot of people who have used both prefer Japanese.

Shun’s are great bang for the buck, most people who have never used a quality knife before are blown away the first time they use them. Like jaw hanging open, scary sharp.

You don’t need to buy an expensive set. Start with a paring knife and an 8” chef’s knife, you’ll pay about $100 for the paring and $150 for the chef’s. You can add in a mid sized knife if you feel you need it, but it’s not necessary.

This would be a really nice starter set if you want 3 knives.

https://www.cutleryandmore.com/shun-...er-set-p125224

Learn to use them well, then add in specialty knives you think would be useful where you find yours lacking. The honesuki is great for deboning chicken thighs, and the gokujo is awesome at removing silverskin and filleting.

Don’t spend a ton on steak knives, they’re serrated so steel quality isn’t important. Same with Cutco. I know a lot of people are happy with them, but you can get a MUCH better quality knife for less $.

Also make sure you get a good wood cutting board, don’t cut on glass, plates, or counter tops.
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Old 09-02-2018, 10:37 PM   #16
bphillips
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Not Cutco. High price for cheap steel

My wife had to have them and they’re a waste. You still have to sharpen and yes it’s free but you have to send them in so kinda defeats the purpose if you use them daily.
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Old 09-02-2018, 10:43 PM   #17
altez
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gatorgrizz27 View Post
A man who knows what heís talking about.

Japanese knives are typically lighter, harder, and sharper. German knives are typically heavier, softer, and wonít hold an edge for as long. Itís personal preference but a lot of people who have used both prefer Japanese.

Shunís are great bang for the buck, most people who have never used a quality knife before are blown away the first time they use them. Like jaw hanging open, scary sharp.

You donít need to buy an expensive set. Start with a paring knife and an 8Ē chefís knife, youíll pay about $100 for the paring and $150 for the chefís. You can add in a mid sized knife if you feel you need it, but itís not necessary.

This would be a really nice starter set if you want 3 knives.

https://www.cutleryandmore.com/shun-...er-set-p125224

Learn to use them well, then add in specialty knives you think would be useful where you find yours lacking. The honesuki is great for deboning chicken thighs, and the gokujo is awesome at removing silverskin and filleting.

Donít spend a ton on steak knives, theyíre serrated so steel quality isnít important. Same with Cutco. I know a lot of people are happy with them, but you can get a MUCH better quality knife for less $.

Also make sure you get a good wood cutting board, donít cut on glass, plates, or counter tops.
Man knows what he's talking about! Shuns are good!
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Old 09-03-2018, 12:00 AM   #18
Matt_C
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Shun
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Old 09-03-2018, 12:33 AM   #19
mzurovec
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Henkel
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Old 09-03-2018, 05:57 AM   #20
MetalMan2004
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gatorgrizz27 View Post
A man who knows what heís talking about.

Japanese knives are typically lighter, harder, and sharper. German knives are typically heavier, softer, and wonít hold an edge for as long. Itís personal preference but a lot of people who have used both prefer Japanese.

Shunís are great bang for the buck, most people who have never used a quality knife before are blown away the first time they use them. Like jaw hanging open, scary sharp.

You donít need to buy an expensive set. Start with a paring knife and an 8Ē chefís knife, youíll pay about $100 for the paring and $150 for the chefís. You can add in a mid sized knife if you feel you need it, but itís not necessary.

This would be a really nice starter set if you want 3 knives.

https://www.cutleryandmore.com/shun-...er-set-p125224

Learn to use them well, then add in specialty knives you think would be useful where you find yours lacking. The honesuki is great for deboning chicken thighs, and the gokujo is awesome at removing silverskin and filleting.

Donít spend a ton on steak knives, theyíre serrated so steel quality isnít important. Same with Cutco. I know a lot of people are happy with them, but you can get a MUCH better quality knife for less $.

Also make sure you get a good wood cutting board, donít cut on glass, plates, or counter tops.
This pretty much sums it up.
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Old 09-03-2018, 09:31 AM   #21
Uncle Saggy
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The link gatorgrizz posted is one hell of a deal


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Old 09-03-2018, 10:10 AM   #22
CastAndBlast
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Wusthof
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Old 09-03-2018, 10:17 AM   #23
clintb
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I forget the name of what we have at home but they are ok. Sab something. I have old Hickory at the ranch and keep them razor sharp. A proper sharp old hickory beats those fancy brands every time IMO. Just treat them like your cast iron pans
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Old 09-03-2018, 11:43 AM   #24
Junkers88
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I've got a set of Henkels that my wife 100% loves. My go-to set are the Old Hickory's that I got when my grandparents passed away. I'll take the wooden handles and carbon steel anyday.

Richard.
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Old 09-03-2018, 12:59 PM   #25
Neyber89
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I have 3 shun’s. Great knives. But have had a full block of Cutco’s for almost 20 years. Great set. Great guarantee
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Old 09-03-2018, 02:22 PM   #26
sir shovelhands
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so much goodness here, I'll add a few things

Quote:
Originally Posted by gatorgrizz27 View Post
A man who knows what he’s talking about.

Japanese knives are typically lighter, harder, and sharper. German knives are typically heavier, softer, and won’t hold an edge for as long. It’s personal preference but a lot of people who have used both prefer Japanese.
As pointed out, Japanese knife sharpness comes from using harder steels (high carbon stainless, or carbon steel), thinner blades, and shallow blade angle. This also makes them more susceptible to chipping, so some forethought is needed for the application. This is why many japanese knives are specialized for specific tasks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gatorgrizz27 View Post
Shun’s are great bang for the buck, most people who have never used a quality knife before are blown away the first time they use them. Like jaw hanging open, scary sharp.

You don’t need to buy an expensive set. Start with a paring knife and an 8” chef’s knife, you’ll pay about $100 for the paring and $150 for the chef’s. You can add in a mid sized knife if you feel you need it, but it’s not necessary.

This would be a really nice starter set if you want 3 knives.

https://www.cutleryandmore.com/shun-...er-set-p125224

Learn to use them well, then add in specialty knives you think would be useful where you find yours lacking. The honesuki is great for deboning chicken thighs, and the gokujo is awesome at removing silverskin and filleting.
I love my honesuki/garasuki. I process about 200 chickens a year at year at my place, and i can break a chicken down in about two minutes with one.
Quote:
Originally Posted by gatorgrizz27 View Post
Don’t spend a ton on steak knives, they’re serrated so steel quality isn’t important. Same with Cutco. I know a lot of people are happy with them, but you can get a MUCH better quality knife for less $.

Also make sure you get a good wood cutting board, don’t cut on glass, plates, or counter tops.
Another knife to not waste money on: the bread knife. Don't spend more than $20, get a dexter, mercer, or tojiro (what I have). And then throw it away when it no longer cuts well.

I also keep a set of cheap pairing knives that I abuse the hell out of (and will probably toss when they cant cut).

If had to start over buying knives I'd get in this order:

1. A good gyuto, 270mm.
2. Two good japanese pairing knife for fine work, and 3 cheap pairing knives.
3. Cheap western boning knife (the bendy kind)
4. Cheap bread knife

That set will do just about anything

If you really like having a bunch of knives, I'd add

Honesuki/Garasuki for birds
Western Deba for fish
A chinese cleaver because they're awesome choppers
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Old 09-03-2018, 02:37 PM   #27
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Shun in my kitchen ,

I got a customer that works for them in some way so I get a decent price break .


They are a lifetime investment in my opinion . Nothing better than grabbing the right tool for the job. As a shop owner for performance harleys I have the same thing in my shop so why not my kitchen .

Some places will have days where they have the knives for customer use and you can try slicing cutting etc with them . I have taken a few class's at Sur La Table , and if you take a class you will get a discount on what you buy .

So are we going to talk about high end cast iron pans next ?? I started buying Le Creuset pans WOW its just like the knives . Amazing

DUAL CORE 6.5-IN. NAKIRI best veggie knife I have every used . ( we eat alot of salads )

DUAL CORE 7-IN. SANTOKU basic use here

DUAL CORE 8-IN. KIRITSUKE

CLASSIC 6-IN. KIRITSUKE
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Old 09-03-2018, 02:54 PM   #28
In-Yo-Grill
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Henckels for us...quick hit with the steel, if needed, and their GTG. Got a knife set because of the value but if I did it all over again I'd buy specific knives as some of them are multi-purpose. I can honestly say that three-four knives could suit all my needs.
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Old 09-03-2018, 04:01 PM   #29
Tony Pic
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I like and use the Cold Steel kitchen set. Steak knives are like lasers. The filet knife is my go to knife when cutting up deer.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Cold-Steel-...YAAOSwmgJY3U6d
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Old 09-03-2018, 04:05 PM   #30
BrandonH
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Wusthof

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Old 09-03-2018, 04:17 PM   #31
Artos
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I went through this same deal & did a ton of research & went with the Mac Pro series of knives...the one thing that was recommended on the chef / knife boards was to hand pick the knives you will use & avoid the sets.

Get a good chopping block for your high end knives too...this one is from Board Smith
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Old 09-03-2018, 06:57 PM   #32
savin yours
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We have the Calphalon Katana Series, fantastic knives! https://www.amazon.com/Calphalon-Kat...173&psc=1&th=1


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Old 09-03-2018, 10:31 PM   #33
rosco11
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Great info here guys.. thanks for laying out a couple of good reviews.. i have an old calphalon set and it's been pretty dang good and gets sharp but the edge doesn't last too long.. I'll be ready to upgrade at some point

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Old 09-03-2018, 10:59 PM   #34
CoolHandLuke
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I just picked the knives I like to use the most and buy them at a restaurant supply store like Ace Mart or allied kenco. They are usually high carbon that are easy to put a sharp edge on. I do not run my kitchen knives in the dishwasher and always use a good cutting board. Do not cut on plates.
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Old 09-04-2018, 07:33 AM   #35
kmitchl
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We have a set of Henkels that are 20 years old. Only one is still sharp to keep my wife out of the ER.
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