Reply
Go Back   TexasBowhunter.com Community Discussion Forums > Topics > Around the Campfire
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 07-11-2018, 10:26 AM   #1
kurt68
Ten Point
 
kurt68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Hunt In: Montgomery Co. and Rocksprings and "H"
Default Wow, you can now legally 3D print any gun

Wow, the dude won the case against the US government.

https://www.wired.com/story/a-landma...social_twitter
kurt68 is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 07-11-2018, 10:40 AM   #2
mmoses
Ten Point
 
mmoses's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: League City TX
Hunt In: Texas
Default

The trouble was that he posted the plans on the internet. Not the making of the gun.

Anyone who can own a gun can make their own.

I am surprised that posting was an issue. I'm sure there are machinest plans for AR15 receivers all over the internet.
mmoses is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 07-11-2018, 10:42 AM   #3
35remington
Pope & Young
 
35remington's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Wilco
Hunt In: the dark
Default

This is clearly the right decision (modified from elsewhere online). For two reasons:

(1) It's 100% legal under federal law to make your own firearms, and it's also legal to tell other people how to make firearms. You can legally buy and sell 80% complete lower receivers (which are legally not guns), mill them out yourself and make a firearm for your own use. You could also buy and sell technical drawings for guns. You could, for example, buy the technical drawings for an M1 Garand if you felt like it. All of that's legal. If that's legal, I don't see how "do it with a computer" is all that different.

(2) Personally, I buy the freedom of speech argument. I guess it's because I lean libertarian, but I am a lot more comfortable with the government outlawing actions than speech. I don't really want the government telling me what information I can and can't share. And with something so simple as a gun, when does it become a crime to talk about guns? For instance, as a historical gun enthusiast, I'm really interested in how guns work and have evolved over time. If I were to watch a technical lecture on YouTube, or even in a gunsmithing school, and we decided it was illegal to distribute information on how to build guns, where would the line be between an academic discussion on how the gun works and is produced and the crime of distributing gun building information?
35remington is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 07-12-2018, 01:01 PM   #4
BillMarks
Nubbin' Buck
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 35remington View Post
It's 100% legal under federal law to make your own firearms, and it's also legal to tell other people how to make firearms. You can legally buy and sell 80% complete lower receivers (which are legally not guns), mill them out yourself and make a firearm for your own use. You could also buy and sell technical drawings for guns. You could, for example, buy the technical drawings for an M1 Garand if you felt like it. All of that's legal. If that's legal, I don't see how "do it with a computer" is all that different.
Just want to clarify, to make sure I understand the law. It is legal to make your own firearms unless the firearms you are making are themselves illegal. Correct?

For example, you could not make a gun that was functionally and aesthetically a sawed-off shotgun (unless that is legal where you are) or has a magazine that holds more than the acceptable rounds for the area. Whatever the state laws are for a given state.

Am I wrong?
BillMarks is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 07-12-2018, 05:57 PM   #5
35remington
Pope & Young
 
35remington's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Wilco
Hunt In: the dark
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BillMarks View Post
Just want to clarify, to make sure I understand the law. It is legal to make your own firearms unless the firearms you are making are themselves illegal. Correct?

For example, you could not make a gun that was functionally and aesthetically a sawed-off shotgun (unless that is legal where you are) or has a magazine that holds more than the acceptable rounds for the area. Whatever the state laws are for a given state.

Am I wrong?
You are right. When most of us think "guns," we're really talking about Title I guns.

Title II guns, including but not limited to SBRs, SBSes, silencers, etc. are a whole 'nother ball game.
35remington is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 07-12-2018, 06:05 PM   #6
Artos
Pope & Young
 
Artos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Deep South TX
Hunt In: Deep South TX
Default

Can a maker legally sell and/or give away a hand made firearm that does not have a serial number & submitted...forgive the laziness, I didn't read the article.

I know folks have been making their own, just not sure how a transfer falls into place...just assumed that would trigger needing an 07 or some sort of notification & adding ID or SN??
Artos is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 07-12-2018, 06:18 PM   #7
CEO
Ten Point
 
CEO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: The Woodlands, TX
Default

Only way to get one through security at the airport. Gotta be ready for some terries.

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
CEO is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 07-12-2018, 08:53 PM   #8
35remington
Pope & Young
 
35remington's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Wilco
Hunt In: the dark
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Artos View Post
Can a maker legally sell and/or give away a hand made firearm that does not have a serial number & submitted...forgive the laziness, I didn't read the article.

I know folks have been making their own, just not sure how a transfer falls into place...just assumed that would trigger needing an 07 or some sort of notification & adding ID or SN??
My totally speculative opinion would be that if the maker built the gun with the INTENT to transfer it, he could need a FFL. And if he made the gun and then after some time went by decided to transfer it, he would not, unless it could be demonstrated that he had a pattern of that behavior.

Just my two cents on that.
35remington is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Old 07-12-2018, 09:10 PM   #9
91cavgt
Ten Point
 
91cavgt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Waco
Default

What I really like is the government made the distinction that an AR15 is not a military weapon. Heads are gonna be exploding over that one!!!
91cavgt is offline   Reply With Quote Back To The Top
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:27 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Copyright 1999-2012, TexasBowhunter.com