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Old 02-16-2018, 04:08 PM   #1
Cody2306
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Default Bareshaft tuning distance.

At what yardage do y'all do your Bareshafting at? I have done it at ten yards last year on a set of wooden arrows. Then played around with the compound for a while. But something about trad equipment really interest me.. So I'm building some traditional onlys.. But curious if y'all Bareshaft out to 20 or is 10 good enough?

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Old 02-16-2018, 05:42 PM   #2
Bisch
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I am not a bare shaft tuner (I paper tune), so take this with a grain of salt.

Everything I have read on bare shaft tuning says if you get things right, you should be able to shoot those bare shafts out to 30. Most folks I have talked to that do it, go at least to 20yds.

Like any form of tuning, it is dependent on good, consistent form. If you jack it up with your form, you will likely not get good enough results to tell much.

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Old 02-16-2018, 06:51 PM   #3
Cody2306
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Gotcha thanks for the advice

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Old 02-16-2018, 10:02 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bisch View Post
I am not a bare shaft tuner (I paper tune), so take this with a grain of salt.

Everything I have read on bare shaft tuning says if you get things right, you should be able to shoot those bare shafts out to 30. Most folks I have talked to that do it, go at least to 20yds.

Like any form of tuning, it is dependent on good, consistent form. If you jack it up with your form, you will likely not get good enough results to tell much.

Bisch


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Bisch... Quick question.. Back when I bareshafted my previous set of arrows I would shoot a Bareshaft and look for Nock left or nock right.. Now I'm reading that's the wrong way. And one would need to shoot Fletched and unfletched and get them to group tune... What method do you use.?

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Old 02-16-2018, 10:22 PM   #5
MEsquivel
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I do bareshaft carbon...not wood arrows.
I usually shoot from 15-17 yards. You need to be pretty consistent on your shooting for your test to be accurate.
What I like to do is grab 3 fletched arrows and 2 bare shafts.
And shoot all 5 randomly at a small target.
I do this 3-4 times or until I feel the outcome was the same.
I start with longer shafts and start cutting off 1/2”after each round. When they start coming closer together, I only cut 1/4” at a time.
Im looking at point of impact, not the tail of the nock.
I hope This made sense and can help you.
Good luck!
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Old 02-16-2018, 10:25 PM   #6
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Thanks. I just realized Bisch doesn't Bareshaft so excuse the second question bisch

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Old 02-16-2018, 10:26 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MEsquivel View Post
I do bareshaft carbon...not wood arrows.
I usually shoot from 15-17 yards. You need to be pretty consistent on your shooting for your test to be accurate.
What I like to do is grab 3 fletched arrows and 2 bare shafts.
And shoot all 5 randomly at a small target.
I do this 3-4 times or until I feel the outcome was the same.
I start with longer shafts and start cutting off 1/2”after each round. When they start coming closer together, I only cut 1/4” at a time.
Im looking at point of impact, not the tail of the nock.
I hope This made sense and can help you.
Good luck!
Are you not gluing in the inserts on the Fletched that way you can go back and cut if necessary?

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Old 02-17-2018, 06:25 AM   #8
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For carbon arrows, I just left them full length and changed point weight to tune them. That works if you have a 29-31" draw....shorter and then you have to cut. Glue inserts when completed. Also, most carbon arrows that aren't perfectly straight are usually bad at the ends, so trim both ends to tune. Spin test them to find out.

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Old 02-17-2018, 08:10 AM   #9
Brandon M.
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You can put a piece of plastic (I use the insert packaging) over the insert to hold it tight and still allow removal until your ready to glue.
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Old 02-17-2018, 09:47 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon M. View Post
You can put a piece of plastic (I use the insert packaging) over the insert to hold it tight and still allow removal until your ready to glue.
I use a foam targets (currently Rhinehart 18-1) for bareshaft because bag targets can skew the true angle of the shot because arrows can move. Anytime I have tried plastic or paper to hold an insert tight I end up pulling my arrow with the insert and point lost inside lol. I cut from the nock end on bareshafts if I need to cut. I started using hot melt on the fletched inserts so if I have to cut I can remove the insert. You do have to be careful with heat and carbon though if you are using carbon arrows. Once I get final length I use epoxy or impact resistant "superglue" on them.

I like to bareshaft from 10, then 15, then finish up at 20. I doubt it's necessary to go to 20 but it's my habit. I know some compound guys that bareshaft out to 40 but that seems like overkill to me.
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Old 02-17-2018, 10:38 AM   #11
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I'm fortunate enough to be able to see what the arrow is doing in flight, but I still bareshaft into a nondirectional foam target in order to get a good comparison of the entry angles of each arrow.

Shooting for groups between fletched arrows, and bareshaft will absolutely do the job, but I just feel like seeing the angles, and adjusting for them help me to refine it some.

Now to your distance question:

Lots of trad folk try to start off bareshaft tuning up at the real close distance they do with compounds. That don't work well for a finger shooter, especially a stickbow finger shooter.

You need to start at a distance of around 9 to 15 feet.
This insures your arrow to be out of the paradox (created by the roll of the string off your fingers) before it strikes the target.

Once you have a pretty good group going on there, then move back to 10 yards, and start tweaking/refining that group (and the arrow angles if you desire).

Once you have it nailed down to satisfaction at 10, then move back to 15 yards, rinse & repeat.

Now chances are, once you have it nailed down at 15 yards, you're likely good to go, but if you really want to do some fine tuning you can move back to 20 yards, and even beyond,

BUT

at those longer distances your release better be clean, because even on a perfectly tuned bareshaft a wanked release can send that arrow into 10-buck-2.

Rick
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Old 02-17-2018, 10:47 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cody2306 View Post
Are you not gluing in the inserts on the Fletched that way you can go back and cut if necessary?

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If you don't care about the position of the graphics on the shaft, then go ahead & secure your inserts at the point end as normal, and cut off at the nock end.

That's what I do, and it makes it way easier.
I generally remove the graphics from my shafts anyway, so . . .

Rick
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Old 02-17-2018, 12:23 PM   #13
Cody2306
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon M. View Post
You can put a piece of plastic (I use the insert packaging) over the insert to hold it tight and still allow removal until your ready to glue.
Great idea

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Old 02-17-2018, 12:27 PM   #14
Cody2306
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Thanks guys for all the tips

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Old 02-17-2018, 02:10 PM   #15
DRT
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I just use the hot glue. I've yet to damage a shaft. All I shoot is carbon.

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Old 02-17-2018, 02:27 PM   #16
RickBarbee
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I can't use hot glue, nor can I use any temporary means to afix the inserts.

If I do, they will blow out into the target on almost every shot.

Even when using extremely strong epoxies, I'll still occasionally get a point/insert blow out, and have to dig it out of my target.

The best I've found so far is the standard old orange Gorilla glue, or Bohning Insert Iron. They both work great, and as far as I can tell are pretty much the same thing.

I use the Gorilla glue, because it's cheaper, and comes in bigger bottles.

Before it gets asked - Yes, I have use Big Jim's hot melt, and yes it is better than the standard old ferrule tite, etc, but it's still hot melt, and don't work well for me.

Rick
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Old 02-17-2018, 03:54 PM   #17
DRT
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I used insert iron on my compound arrows. Great stuff.

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Old 02-17-2018, 03:55 PM   #18
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And Rick I'm sure that arrow is hammering the target out of your bow. My 45 to 48lbs of dw won't deliver nearly the pop.

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