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Old 08-11-2018, 02:05 PM   #1
bgleaton
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Default Cultipacker for Food Plots

We havenít had much success with fall food plots at our place around Brady, TX over the past two years due to lack of rainfall in the fall and winter. We currently have a disk harrow, broadcaster and a drag. I noticed that even after we disked and drug the fields the soil was very fluffy and the seed would just sit on top of the soil even after dragging. We are looking at buying a cultipacker this year to help ensure that the soil is firm and to ensure the seeds are pressed into the soil. From what Iíve read is that a cultipacker could really help ensure the field is clod-free and firm up the soil to help prevent moisture loss. We are planting oats and wheat and maybe some soybeans and clover this fall and will probably plant the weekend of 10/19. Weíve tried planting at the beginning of October the past two years but after an early rain it got too hot and burned everything. Here is the cultipacker we are looking at buying:
https://www.everythingattachments.co...ipacker-72.htm
Do any of you guys have any advise or know if any other cultipackers that you would recommend? Thanks for the input!
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Old 08-11-2018, 02:46 PM   #2
Skinny
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Default Cultipacker for Food Plots

We use a cultipacker on food plots. Typically pulled behind the Ranger.

Our normal routine is to disc really well first. Spread seed and fertilizer. Disc again. Then run packer over it. We always get a good stand.

There will always be some seed that doesnít get covered to the right depth with this method, but Iíd say at least 90% of it does.

We plant at a seed rate of about 110 pounds per acre. Wheat, oats, rye, etc.




Skinny

Last edited by Skinny; 08-11-2018 at 03:02 PM.
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Old 08-11-2018, 03:16 PM   #3
Big pig
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This rain should help!!!
Between the dry falls and the army worms,
Later planting works better for me.
I spread more seed than “normal” cause seed is cheap compared to the time and effort spent.
That cultipacker should help! Good luck.
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Old 08-11-2018, 03:17 PM   #4
blhaley91
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Get you a grain drill and you should have much better results.
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Old 08-11-2018, 03:36 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skinny View Post
We use a cultipacker on food plots. Typically pulled behind the Ranger.

Our normal routine is to disc really well first. Spread seed and fertilizer. Disc again. Then run packer over it. We always get a good stand.

There will always be some seed that doesnít get covered to the right depth with this method, but Iíd say at least 90% of it does.

We plant at a seed rate of about 110 pounds per acre. Wheat, oats, rye, etc.




Skinny
Did you build or buy that?

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Old 08-11-2018, 04:21 PM   #6
Snowflake Killa
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I don't have a cultipacker I've been using a big roller I pull with my tractor
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Old 08-11-2018, 04:25 PM   #7
Skinny
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Did you build or buy that?

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Bought it. Not sure where. I wanna say online and it was delivered.


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Old 08-11-2018, 04:30 PM   #8
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Bought it. Not sure where. I wanna say online and it was delivered.


Skinny
Thanks. Found one like it on the innerwebs. More than I thought it was

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Old 08-11-2018, 04:34 PM   #9
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I use the very cultipacker that you linked. I really like it. Easier to turn around in tight places and heavy enough to do the job. I plotted several years before I bought one just using a tire drag and made good plots, but I really like the cultipacker for small seeds. I still drag but plant my small seeds on top and then pack the hell out of it.
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Old 08-11-2018, 05:10 PM   #10
bgleaton
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I found this cultipacker for the Polaris but it’s only 385lbs:
https://www.gearup2go.com/till-ease-...SABEgJ4SPD_BwE

Do you think n this is heavy enough to break clods and firm up the soil? I like the idea of using a cultipacker that attaches to the UTV so we can have a couple of people working at the same time - tractor and Polaris.
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Old 08-11-2018, 05:45 PM   #11
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I have no idea. Never used a UTV for anything except hauling seed and fertilizer or spraying. I do all my plots alone for the most part and with quick hitches it only takes about five minutes to get from disc to cultipacker. I disc all my plots, then drag all of them, then plant and fertilize, etc. so when I get through with an implement I’m through with it. If I get some help on the weekend it’s usually just handling seed and fertilizer. Whatever size you decide to get you won’t be disappointed in the quality of the one in the first link. It’s well made.

Edit: I just looked at your last link. For the money, I myself would not buy that one. It may work for your soils, but it wouldn’t in some of mine. Depending on how dry it is, some of mine are pretty big clods. I do my best to disc them down small, but a good cultipacker can make the difference in germination.

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Old 08-11-2018, 06:38 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by bgleaton View Post
I found this cultipacker for the Polaris but itís only 385lbs:
https://www.gearup2go.com/till-ease-...SABEgJ4SPD_BwE

Do you think n this is heavy enough to break clods and firm up the soil? I like the idea of using a cultipacker that attaches to the UTV so we can have a couple of people working at the same time - tractor and Polaris.


That looks like the one we have. Itís served us well over the years. Ours can be pull behind or 3 point hook up. I prefer to pull it behind the Ranger.


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Old 08-11-2018, 10:30 PM   #13
bgleaton
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Thanks for your input. I really like that style of cultipacker, I just want to make sure that it’s heavy enough to truly break the clods and compress the soil. Everything I’ve read is to get a 600lb cultipacker or more. Does this style really break it all up and compress the soil? Sorry for all of the questions.
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Old 08-11-2018, 11:51 PM   #14
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Default Cultipacker for Food Plots

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Originally Posted by bgleaton View Post
Thanks for your input. I really like that style of cultipacker, I just want to make sure that itís heavy enough to truly break the clods and compress the soil. Everything Iíve read is to get a 600lb cultipacker or more. Does this style really break it all up and compress the soil? Sorry for all of the questions.


Iím not sure what ours weights but Iíd say 300-400 pounds maybe. We try to get a good seed bed prepped by discing really well first. The packer does do a good job of breaking up clods. I guess it really depends on your initial disc and soil type though.

Sometimes Iíll run the packer over the ground a couple times till itís pretty clod free.


Skinny

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Old 08-12-2018, 08:44 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by bgleaton View Post
I found this cultipacker for the Polaris but itís only 385lbs:
https://www.gearup2go.com/till-ease-...SABEgJ4SPD_BwE

Do you think n this is heavy enough to break clods and firm up the soil? I like the idea of using a cultipacker that attaches to the UTV so we can have a couple of people working at the same time - tractor and Polaris.
Look at the ones tractor supply carries. They look just like the one skinny posted and similar to the one you did.

Half the money

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Old 08-12-2018, 12:27 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Skinny View Post
Iím not sure what ours weights but Iíd say 300-400 pounds maybe. We try to get a good seed bed prepped by discing really well first. The packer does do a good job of breaking up clods. I guess it really depends on your initial disc and soil type though.

Sometimes Iíll run the packer over the ground a couple times till itís pretty clod free.


Skinny

Where is your place located? How many times do you disk that the fields and do you normally just disk right before planting? Thanks for all of your help!
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Old 08-12-2018, 12:37 PM   #17
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Most folks usually bust up ground right before seeding etc. The plot or field needs to be plowed/disc couple of times throughout the year. This keeps the native grasses and weeds from robbing your soil of moisture needed for the seed. Then like others said seed drill and then cultipack. For grazing good rule of thumb for wheat/oats is to have it planted by Laborday. Hope this helps sir, God Bless.
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Old 08-12-2018, 12:38 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by bgleaton View Post
Where is your place located? How many times do you disk that the fields and do you normally just disk right before planting? Thanks for all of your help!


Montague County. We typically disc the first part of September and have the seed bed ready for planting based on rain chances. I like to plant a little later in September to hopefully get past the heat and army worms.

Having the seed bed prepped in advance seems to work better as it turns the ground into a sponge so to speak. Any moisture after the first disc gets held in the soil really well.

I have done it all different ways with success...including doing everything in a single weekend. Disc, plant, drag, pack, etc.

Iím considering discing now as we just got some rain and the ground should turn over pretty good as itís moist.

This year we killed all vegetation off the ground in early summer. Weíve been fighting Johnson grass over the last few years.


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Old 08-12-2018, 03:23 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by Skinny View Post
Montague County. We typically disc the first part of September and have the seed bed ready for planting based on rain chances. I like to plant a little later in September to hopefully get past the heat and army worms.

Having the seed bed prepped in advance seems to work better as it turns the ground into a sponge so to speak. Any moisture after the first disc gets held in the soil really well.

I have done it all different ways with success...including doing everything in a single weekend. Disc, plant, drag, pack, etc.

Iím considering discing now as we just got some rain and the ground should turn over pretty good as itís moist.

This year we killed all vegetation off the ground in early summer. Weíve been fighting Johnson grass over the last few years.


Skinny
We are going to purchase the one just like yours. Itís 400lbs and we are going to add the wheel and 3pt kit just to give us the option to use it on the Polaris ranger or tractor. I think this will really help us firm up the soil and prevent a lot of air pockets which will prevent the soil from drying out so fast. We will disk and drag the fields in September and then broadcast 1/2 of seed/ all of fertilizer in mid October, disk and drag it in lightly, then run the cultipacker over it and then spread the remaining 1/2 of seed and use cultipacker once more. Looking forward to seeing how this works. Iím hoping we get a better stand this year. Thanks again for all of your input!
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Old 08-12-2018, 03:25 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by TKC View Post
Most folks usually bust up ground right before seeding etc. The plot or field needs to be plowed/disc couple of times throughout the year. This keeps the native grasses and weeds from robbing your soil of moisture needed for the seed. Then like others said seed drill and then cultipack. For grazing good rule of thumb for wheat/oats is to have it planted by Laborday. Hope this helps sir, God Bless.
Thanks for your input! Weíve planted around Labor Day before but weíve gotten rain righ afterwards and then 95-degree heat for three straight weeks which burned everything and killed it. We are going to plant on October 19th this year to see if that will help. Anyone else plant in mid October? What have your results been like?
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Old 08-12-2018, 04:55 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by bgleaton View Post
Thanks for your input! Weíve planted around Labor Day before but weíve gotten rain righ afterwards and then 95-degree heat for three straight weeks which burned everything and killed it. We are going to plant on October 19th this year to see if that will help. Anyone else plant in mid October? What have your results been like?


I have planted mid October several times over the years. I do have my seed bed ready to go by mid August tho.

I actually just got off the tractor. I disced up 4 acres today. Turned the ground over pretty good after 3/4Ē of rain the past few days. Figured Iíd take advantage of the moist ground. Ground was hard as a rock last week.



And to the guys saying use a seed drill...I agree that is a really great way to ensure proper seed depth, but really not practical for most guys especially looking at the ones planting smaller plots.


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Old 08-14-2018, 03:06 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by blhaley91 View Post
Get you a grain drill and you should have much better results.
I wish I had the money to buy one but a grain drill is too expensive to use for only 5 acres of food plots per year. If we had a big operation then it's probably worth the $$. I have also looked at auctions, craigslist and every other place for nearly 2 years and still haven't found a good deal that's somewhat close to our property.

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Old 08-14-2018, 03:17 PM   #23
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I wish I had the money to buy one but a grain drill is too expensive to use for only 5 acres of food plots per year. If we had a big operation then it's probably worth the $$. I have also looked at auctions, craigslist and every other place for nearly 2 years and still haven't found a good deal that's somewhat close to our property.
That cultipacker listed above was 1200 or so. I have bought several grain drills for 100's. I have an 8 footer that I use to plant my plots at my house that I paid 175 bucks for. Can pull with a 4 wheeler, ranger, tractor, or truck. I have a larger 14 footer that I leave at the ranch that I paid 500 for. It can also be pulled with any of the above. I also have a 6 foot No Til Drill that I paid 400 for.

I know a guy that is selling some farm equipment cheap if you are interested PM me.

Either one you buy is going to sit unused most of the year anyhow.

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Old 08-14-2018, 03:17 PM   #24
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And to the guys saying use a seed drill...I agree that is a really great way to ensure proper seed depth, but really not practical for most guys especially looking at the ones planting smaller plots.


Skinny[/QUOTE]

False.
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Old 08-14-2018, 03:19 PM   #25
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We typically disc up ground real good with our 6' disc and then a couple weeks later come back with our plotmaster and put the seed in the ground.
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Old 08-14-2018, 03:21 PM   #26
blhaley91
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Buy this one, keep one section and sell the other 2..

https://austin.craigslist.org/grd/d/...663890245.html

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Old 08-14-2018, 11:16 PM   #27
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So if you are planting with a regular drill like in your link you still have to disc it right? Only a specific no till drill will allow you to just drill into the thatch if I understand it right.
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Old 08-15-2018, 05:30 PM   #28
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Default Cultipacker for Food Plots

.

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Old 08-15-2018, 05:35 PM   #29
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And to the guys saying use a seed drill...I agree that is a really great way to ensure proper seed depth, but really not practical for most guys especially looking at the ones planting smaller plots.





Skinny


False.[/QUOTE]



So youíre saying that buying a grain drill to specifically plant a small number of acreage is practical? Ok.



Skinny
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Old 08-15-2018, 05:48 PM   #30
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Priefert is now selling this. Never used one before.

http://wildlife-equipment.com/2017/0...he-firminator/

The Firminator

Hey everybody! Sorry itís been a while since Iíve posted a blog. I had an incredible opportunity this spring to talk with some of the industry leaders on my wildlife management areas. I am still headed in the same direction with my wildlife management areas, I just had to re-route a couple of times. Before I share my progress on the food plots, I wanted to share a new product that I have been using Ė The Firminator.

This 8í implement has saved me an incredible amount of time. The Firminator has taken the place of three different tools and combined them all into one. A neat thing about this product is that if I donít want to use all three tools at once, I can still use them individually.

Take a look at my YouTube video as I use The Firminator to plant cow peas and brown top millet. Special thank you to Blake Hamilton with Natureís Eye Consulting for recommending this product. For more information on The Firminator, visit the Firminator website or contact William Yancy at (678) 544-4400.

To view past blogs and stay in touch with everything we are doing here on the ranch, click the ďFrom The BlindĒ tab on the Priefert Wildlife website or follow us on Facebook.
Attached Images
  

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Old 08-15-2018, 05:48 PM   #31
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So if you are planting with a regular drill like in your link you still have to disc it right? Only a specific no till drill will allow you to just drill into the thatch if I understand it right.
I think that's right. No till means exactly that, no tilling. The "drills" in that Craigslist ad wouldn't scratch my ground before it rained, and certainly won't cut through much thatch. A true no till drill would be nice, but at $10K and up, I don't think I'll be buying one next week. I'll stick to discing my plots and broadcasting the seed and fertilizer, it's been pretty good to me so far.
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Old 08-15-2018, 05:53 PM   #32
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Old 08-15-2018, 06:22 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by Worksalot View Post
Priefert is now selling this. Never used one before.

http://wildlife-equipment.com/2017/0...he-firminator/

The Firminator

Hey everybody! Sorry itís been a while since Iíve posted a blog. I had an incredible opportunity this spring to talk with some of the industry leaders on my wildlife management areas. I am still headed in the same direction with my wildlife management areas, I just had to re-route a couple of times. Before I share my progress on the food plots, I wanted to share a new product that I have been using Ė The Firminator.

This 8í implement has saved me an incredible amount of time. The Firminator has taken the place of three different tools and combined them all into one. A neat thing about this product is that if I donít want to use all three tools at once, I can still use them individually.

Take a look at my YouTube video as I use The Firminator to plant cow peas and brown top millet. Special thank you to Blake Hamilton with Natureís Eye Consulting for recommending this product. For more information on The Firminator, visit the Firminator website or contact William Yancy at (678) 544-4400.

To view past blogs and stay in touch with everything we are doing here on the ranch, click the ďFrom The BlindĒ tab on the Priefert Wildlife website or follow us on Facebook.
I'd love one of those but something like 5k for a 4 or 5 footer!

Hard to justify that coin for 4 or 5 acres of food plots

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Old 08-15-2018, 06:46 PM   #34
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I'd love one of those but something like 5k for a 4 or 5 footer!

Hard to justify that coin for 4 or 5 acres of food plots

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You just have to have the want bad enough.
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Old 08-15-2018, 06:52 PM   #35
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You just have to have the want bad enough.
Oh I want it. Just cheaper to give my teenage son and his friend a bucket and some seed while I run the tractor

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Old 08-16-2018, 11:10 AM   #36
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I have this cultipacker and am happy with it. It's a small company and the owner will work with you if you need to do anything specific regarding the 3pt hookup or anything else.

https://omni-mfg.com/OMNI-MAGNUM-Cul...-P3507346.aspx
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Old 08-16-2018, 03:48 PM   #37
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False.


So youíre saying that buying a grain drill to specifically plant a small number of acreage is practical? Ok.



Skinny[/QUOTE]

Correct. Only if practical to you means cheaper to buy the equipment and better germination rate (90% compared to 50-60% broadcasting).

Not to mention I dont have to unhook a bunch of equipment to swap. I can pull the drill behind my tractor with plow still attached, or attach to a 4 wheeler or mule.

My point is that if you have to BUY either anyway and both will sit there most of the year unused why not have something that will work best when in use and is more cost efficient?

Even if you cultipack the seed it is still sitting on top of the soil for the birds to eat, or to bake in the sun if no rain soon. When drilled it can sit under the soil ready to go until conditions are right.

If you are planting a small plot 1/4, 1/2 ect you may be better off just building/buying a drag harrow and broadcasting.

All of this is under the assumption that we are talking about planting wheat, oats, rye etc. If planting turnips or clover a cultipacker is the way to go unless you have the small seed box on your drill. Any other method will plant those small seeds too deep.
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Old 08-16-2018, 03:51 PM   #38
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Default Cultipacker for Food Plots

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Originally Posted by blhaley91 View Post
So youíre saying that buying a grain drill to specifically plant a small number of acreage is practical? Ok.







Skinny


Correct. Only if practical to you means cheaper to buy the equipment and better germination rate (90% compared to 50-60% broadcasting).



Not to mention I dont have to unhook a bunch of equipment to swap. I can pull the drill behind my tractor with plow still attached, or attach to a 4 wheeler or mule.



My point is that if you have to BUY either anyway and both will sit there most of the year unused why not have something that will work best when in use and is more cost efficient?



Even if you cultipack the seed it is still sitting on top of the soil for the birds to eat, or to bake in the sun if no rain soon. When drilled it can sit under the soil ready to go until conditions are right.



If you are planting a small plot 1/4, 1/2 ect you may be better off just building/buying a drag harrow and broadcasting.



All of this is under the assumption that we are talking about planting wheat, oats, rye etc. If planting turnips or clover a cultipacker is the way to go unless you have the small seed box on your drill. Any other method will plant those small seeds too deep.[/QUOTE]



Yeah Iíve got access to a seed drill. Works well. I donít use it for small plots.


Skinny

Last edited by Skinny; 08-16-2018 at 03:57 PM.
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Old 08-16-2018, 04:05 PM   #39
texan4ut
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Not sure how good this one is but priced right. Probably be great for a small plot.
https://www.sportsmansguide.com/prod...cker?a=1918616
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Old 08-18-2018, 07:03 PM   #40
elliscountyhog
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Went to brady yesterday and several fields not only planted already but several already have wheat 3-4” tall. I always thought this was way too early for Texas due to the extreme heat and drought possibilities but the fields looked good.’
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Old 08-18-2018, 07:56 PM   #41
.243 WSSM
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Summer cancel. We are in a pattern change. The farmers are aware of it and you should too
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Old 08-19-2018, 08:41 AM   #42
bboswell
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elliscountyhog View Post
Went to brady yesterday and several fields not only planted already but several already have wheat 3-4Ē tall. I always thought this was way too early for Texas due to the extreme heat and drought possibilities but the fields looked good.í


Itís too early. Great chance those stands will burn back and die soon
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Old 08-20-2018, 10:28 PM   #43
Skinny
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bboswell View Post
Itís too early. Great chance those stands will burn back and die soon


Or be gobbled up by army worms.


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