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Old 02-13-2018, 11:51 AM   #1
Buff
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Default Tankless hot water heater ?

Is there any reason not to go with tankless ?
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Old 02-13-2018, 11:55 AM   #2
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Nope love mine
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Old 02-13-2018, 12:11 PM   #3
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Lots of variable. Power is a big one. Hard water?
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Old 02-13-2018, 12:14 PM   #4
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I recommend just getting a tankless water heater. Getting the tankless "hot" water heater seems like a waste of time.



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Old 02-13-2018, 12:16 PM   #5
meltingfeather
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buff View Post
Is there any reason not to go with tankless ?
Yes... if you don't have a need for one and/or aren't likely to do the increased maintenance they require. Also, they cost a LOT more and the install can be very expensive, particularly if you have to do gas plumbing or vent work (likely if you're changing from a conventional).
Typically it's driven by high usage... the "endless supply" benefit. That's only a benefit if your conventional can't keep up... and for the money it better be very important to you because the premium you'll pay for install of a tankless and the heater itself is big. Efficiency wise there isn't a big benefit. Insulation has come a long way and modern conventional heaters are very efficient.
I'm an engineer in the water business and am about to replace my conventional heater... with another conventional heater. No driver in our case for a tankless.

Last edited by meltingfeather; 02-13-2018 at 12:19 PM.
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Old 02-13-2018, 12:32 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by meltingfeather View Post
Yes... if you don't have a need for one and/or aren't likely to do the increased maintenance they require. Also, they cost a LOT more and the install can be very expensive, particularly if you have to do gas plumbing or vent work (likely if you're changing from a conventional).
Typically it's driven by high usage... the "endless supply" benefit. That's only a benefit if your conventional can't keep up... and for the money it better be very important to you because the premium you'll pay for install of a tankless and the heater itself is big. Efficiency wise there isn't a big benefit. Insulation has come a long way and modern conventional heaters are very efficient.
I'm an engineer in the water business and am about to replace my conventional heater... with another conventional heater. No driver in our case for a tankless.
Propane is killing me, about $400.00 a month right now.
I believe the hot water heater is the main culprit as it is 12 years old and every time I check it it is running.
I figured the tank-less heater was a more efficient system but that is why I asked.
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Old 02-13-2018, 12:37 PM   #7
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Love ours.
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Old 02-13-2018, 12:39 PM   #8
Mike
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Locally, we have had quite a few pipes/connections break at the unit during the last cold spell. Those units were in attics.

Quote:
Yes... if you don't have a need for one and/or aren't likely to do the increased maintenance they require. Also, they cost a LOT more and the install can be very expensive, particularly if you have to do gas plumbing or vent work (likely if you're changing from a conventional).
Typically it's driven by high usage... the "endless supply" benefit. That's only a benefit if your conventional can't keep up... and for the money it better be very important to you because the premium you'll pay for install of a tankless and the heater itself is big. Efficiency wise there isn't a big benefit. Insulation has come a long way and modern conventional heaters are very efficient.
I'm an engineer in the water business and am about to replace my conventional heater... with another conventional heater. No driver in our case for a tankless.
What about use in a shop/outdoor kitchen and pool bathroom/shower? Would you still do conventional? I was thinking tankless due to sparse usage but maybe conventional is the way to go?
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Old 02-13-2018, 12:43 PM   #9
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Buff - I had one for 7.5 years with very little maintenance. It was the only thing I had running off of propane and it cost me about $130 every 3- 3 1/2 months. That was with 3adults in the house.

The wife and I are now living with the in-laws while we build our new house and they have a conventional heater - very frustrating when 2 showers are running.
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Old 02-13-2018, 12:45 PM   #10
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Try to locate it centrally in your house, otherwise you will be waiting a while for the hot water. But once it gets there it doesnt run out.
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Old 02-13-2018, 12:49 PM   #11
tps7742
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If you get one with the recirculating line and run it too hot with c3 it could be expensive to operate also. Depending on the temp you set it at. We have one and run C3 also due to living in a rural area.
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Old 02-13-2018, 12:50 PM   #12
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I’ve done a lot of reading on these and to me the only downside is the initial cost. It’s not going to be really anymore maintenance than a conventional. If you have hard water you’ll need to flush it maybe once a year. If it is installed right there will be easy access to run cleaner through it.
Some advantages are the unlimited hot water, they take up much less space(can even be installed outside), use less propane.

I have a 12 year old water heater but our gas bill is less than $100 a month usually and that includes heater and fireplace.
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Old 02-13-2018, 12:54 PM   #13
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The long term benefits out way the initial cost
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Old 02-13-2018, 01:05 PM   #14
Mike D
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If your water is already hot, why do you need a water heater?

Sorry couldn’t resist.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
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Old 02-13-2018, 01:19 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buff View Post
Propane is killing me, about $400.00 a month right now.
I believe the hot water heater is the main culprit as it is 12 years old and every time I check it it is running.
I figured the tank-less heater was a more efficient system but that is why I asked.
$400 a month? Wow! I have a tankless heater and the propane bill is around $625 a year. It's just my wife and I but all appliances are propane including the dryer. I also have a 65,000 BTU shop heater that gets used a lot in the winter.
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Old 02-13-2018, 01:22 PM   #16
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Do you have a teenage son? With endless hot water he may never come out of the shower, unless he runs out of conditioner.
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Old 02-13-2018, 01:26 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CabezaBlanca View Post
$400 a month? Wow! I have a tankless heater and the propane bill is around $625 a year. It's just my wife and I but all appliances are propane including the dryer. I also have a 65,000 BTU shop heater that gets used a lot in the winter.
I just bought the house. I filled the tank $800.00 around Jan 1st.
It ran empty Feb 3. I figured the bad weather we had was the problem and filled it again. Checked it last night and it is down to 60%.
They pressure tested it before the first fill so I am sure I dont have any leaks.
It is a big house but wow that is a lot of propane
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Old 02-13-2018, 01:57 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buff View Post
I just bought the house. I filled the tank $800.00 around Jan 1st.
It ran empty Feb 3. I figured the bad weather we had was the problem and filled it again. Checked it last night and it is down to 60%.
They pressure tested it before the first fill so I am sure I dont have any leaks.
It is a big house but wow that is a lot of propane
It sure is!
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Old 02-13-2018, 02:23 PM   #19
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$600 a month to heat a 16,000 square foot house isn't bad.
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Old 02-13-2018, 03:13 PM   #20
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Mine lasted 5 years. Im having it replaced today. I wonder what it will cost..close to 1k? I like how hot water never runs out. Replacing every 5 years..not so much
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Old 02-13-2018, 03:24 PM   #21
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Mine lasted 5 years. Im having it replaced today. I wonder what it will cost..close to 1k? I like how hot water never runs out. Replacing every 5 years..not so much
How hard is your water? And if that isn't it, what happened that warranted replacement?

The city dropped me in a gas meter last week and my tankless heater is getting installed as we speak. I sure hope it lasts longer than that.
I have a house with a wife and two daughters who are very young and we are already running short of hot water some days. I figured now was as good of a time as ever to upgrade.
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Old 02-13-2018, 03:26 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by meltingfeather View Post
Yes... if you don't have a need for one and/or aren't likely to do the increased maintenance they require. Also, they cost a LOT more and the install can be very expensive, particularly if you have to do gas plumbing or vent work (likely if you're changing from a conventional).
Typically it's driven by high usage... the "endless supply" benefit. That's only a benefit if your conventional can't keep up... and for the money it better be very important to you because the premium you'll pay for install of a tankless and the heater itself is big. Efficiency wise there isn't a big benefit. Insulation has come a long way and modern conventional heaters are very efficient.
I'm an engineer in the water business and am about to replace my conventional heater... with another conventional heater. No driver in our case for a tankless.
I worry about my conventional leaking or the tank rupturing from rust-out (unknowingly) and flooding my house with water. I do flush mine every 6 mo., maybe it helps, maybe it doesn't.
At least with a tankless, I could mount it in the garage where it can flood all it wants.
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Old 02-13-2018, 03:35 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buff View Post
I just bought the house. I filled the tank $800.00 around Jan 1st.
It ran empty Feb 3. I figured the bad weather we had was the problem and filled it again. Checked it last night and it is down to 60%.
They pressure tested it before the first fill so I am sure I dont have any leaks.
It is a big house but wow that is a lot of propane
You might have a water leak on your hot side somewhere.

We do a lot of high gas bill complaints and usually find a leak in the slab causing the water heater to run a lot.

Tankless gas water heaters are more efficient than tank type but they are more expensive to initially install. Tankless is not always the best answer but it is most of the time.

Well water is not kind to tankless water heaters. Actually not kind to anything plumbing. Just because you have a water "meter" does not mean it is not well water that the water company uses. Most private water supply companies pump water from underground, treat it and then send it on down the line to the customers.

Surface water (lake water) is much better for plumbing fixtures.

Tankless water heaters need to be flushed at least once a year if using well water. Surface water sources can get away with 2-3 years before flushing. Sometimes longer.

If you have a tank type heater it should also be drained annually if using well water.

These suggestions apply to both gas and electric water heaters.
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Old 02-13-2018, 03:36 PM   #24
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Cant say I have ever heated hot water. That being said we have a tankless, and love it.
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Old 02-13-2018, 03:38 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tdwinklr View Post
I worry about my conventional leaking or the tank rupturing from rust-out (unknowingly) and flooding my house with water. I do flush mine every 6 mo., maybe it helps, maybe it doesn't.
At least with a tankless, I could mount it in the garage where it can flood all it wants.
There is no steel tank to leak or rupture in a tank less heater. Garage location is always much better but a tank less in the attic is better than a tank type. If you flush it every 6 months you will be far ahead of the game. It does matter.

I prefer to keep all water piping out of the attic when possible but new homes are being built with water lines going all over. They are usually PEX but anything can leak.
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Old 02-13-2018, 03:39 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Farmdog View Post
Mine lasted 5 years. Im having it replaced today. I wonder what it will cost..close to 1k? I like how hot water never runs out. Replacing every 5 years..not so much
why the replacement ?
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Old 02-13-2018, 03:42 PM   #27
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Buff, you may not have a leak in your tank, but you may have a gas leak in your piping somewhere or in a hot water line. You are going through way too much propane
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Old 02-13-2018, 03:51 PM   #28
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If you have hard water I wouldnt
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Old 02-13-2018, 03:54 PM   #29
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I believe hard water and cheap valves are my problem. PLUMBER is working on 2 bathrooms as well. The house is over 22 years and these problems related to hard water are pretty consistent every few years. My 1k estimate was a fantasy I afraid. I wont go back to a tank myself
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Old 02-13-2018, 04:00 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tdwinklr View Post
I worry about my conventional leaking or the tank rupturing from rust-out (unknowingly) and flooding my house with water. I do flush mine every 6 mo., maybe it helps, maybe it doesn't.
At least with a tankless, I could mount it in the garage where it can flood all it wants.
Tankless water heaters can also leak... and you can also put your conventional in the garage.
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Old 02-13-2018, 04:08 PM   #31
meltingfeather
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buff View Post
Propane is killing me, about $400.00 a month right now.
I believe the hot water heater is the main culprit as it is 12 years old and every time I check it it is running.
I figured the tank-less heater was a more efficient system but that is why I asked.
Wow... that's a lot of propane. 12 years old or not, that doesn't add up.

Consumer Reports put the annual savings at $70-$80 per year... yep, less than $7/month. Economically it makes no sense... it's all about running out of hot water if that's an issue for you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike View Post
Locally, we have had quite a few pipes/connections break at the unit during the last cold spell. Those units were in attics.

What about use in a shop/outdoor kitchen and pool bathroom/shower? Would you still do conventional? I was thinking tankless due to sparse usage but maybe conventional is the way to go?
Freezing and pipe breaks are more of a problem with tankless because they don't stay hot and people put them in creative places, including outside.
A small, under-counter conventional unit is how I handle those applications... on a switch so you can turn it on/off easily. Tankless like to be used regularly.
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Old 02-13-2018, 04:12 PM   #32
Todd-ty729
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Quote:
Originally Posted by meltingfeather View Post
Wow... that's a lot of propane. 12 years old or not, that doesn't add up.

Consumer Reports put the annual savings at $70-$80 per year... yep, less than $7/month. Economically it makes no sense... it's all about running out of hot water if that's an issue for you.


Freezing and pipe breaks are more of a problem with tankless because they don't stay hot and people put them in creative places, including outside.
A small, under-counter conventional unit is how I handle those applications... on a switch so you can turn it on/off easily. Tankless like to be used regularly.
I agree with what you wrote but a good tank less model has freeze protection features. Doesn't cover everything but helps. Still a fan of nothing plumbing in the attic personally but water heaters in attics are so common on modern new home construction. Job security I suppose.
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Old 02-13-2018, 05:26 PM   #33
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632.40 from Builders FirstSource
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Old 02-13-2018, 05:29 PM   #34
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Eco Smart 27KW
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Old 02-13-2018, 05:38 PM   #35
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Had mine 10 year's love it
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Old 02-13-2018, 05:41 PM   #36
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I don't own one but do work for a wholesale distributor that sells a crap ton of tankless heaters. From that standpoint I'd advise not going electric. Our gas (LP and NG) sales compared to electric are hand over fist.
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