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Old 02-10-2017, 07:24 AM   #1
txbassnaholic
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Default What lens do would you suggest?

I have a trip planned for Yellowstone this September. I have a Tamron 150-600. Does anyone have a suggestion for a lens to use? I would rent one if needed. Thanks.........
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Old 02-10-2017, 08:22 AM   #2
Snakelover
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I took a Tamron 150-600mm to Yellowstone and Grand Teton and you can see the results here...

Wyoming 2015

With good lighting conditions, it's enough lens in terms of magnification and has the advantage of being (relatively) light and portable. Granted, if the lighting happens to be dim, you might wish for a faster lens. There will be situations where you have sufficient time to break out the tripod. But you also might miss shots in certain situations by taking the time to set up a tripod. Also, depending on how you get there, there could be travel considerations on how much gear you take. There are a lot of variables, but if I could ONLY take one lens, I'd take the one you already have.
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Old 02-10-2017, 08:28 AM   #3
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The times I wished for a faster lens was mostly in the mornings and evenings. The Grizzly Bears and Wolves tend to be most active then. We didn't see any Wolves, but did see Grizzlies. And some of those shots turned out too noisy from high ISO be be very usable. That would also be a situation when you would have time to set up a tripod for the heft of a faster lens. The Grizzlies are usually at a greater distance. Once they are spotted, you may be watching them for several minutes up to even half an hour or more.
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Old 02-10-2017, 08:57 AM   #4
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What are you looking to take pictures of? If you're doing landscapes, I would consider renting either the Nikon 14-24 f/2.8 or the Canon 11-24 f/2.8 depending on your platform, obviously. Here's an image I got with my Nikon 14-24.

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Old 02-10-2017, 09:11 AM   #5
Casey
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What camera are you using? That can make a difference in suggestions.

You need something wide. There is a lot more to Yellowstone than wildlife. Maybe you've got that covered.
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Old 02-10-2017, 09:16 AM   #6
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I would rent the fastest lens possible that will have a 28mm or 50mm and at widest open 1.x for an f-stop. The photographer for a hundred years shot on nikons with 50mm 1.5 lens all over Yellowstone. The times you'll want "that shot" will be magic hour. The time at sunup and sundown. That big lens you are taking with you won't do the job. Also consider getting in and out of the car to set up a shot are you going to use a tripod, or monopod? I'd go for at least a Manfrotto monopod. If you're going to open up that app and slow down that shutter you'll need something to steady that camera.
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Old 02-10-2017, 10:12 AM   #7
Shane
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For landscapes, I'd suggest a wide angle. Something like a 17-40mm, 17-70mm, etc... Or an ultra-wide like 11-16mm, 12-24mm, etc... And you don't really have to have super fast for those. Middle f-stops will give you better image quality and clarity as well as more depth of field for landscapes anyway. An f/4 lens would be fine. Use a tripod for low light sunrise/sunset shots at f/8 or so.
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Old 02-10-2017, 10:55 AM   #8
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I'm shooting a Canon 7D MkII and have a 24-105 lens. I will be shooting both wildlife and scenery. I have it planned to take a monopod. Hope this info helps....
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Old 02-10-2017, 10:57 AM   #9
Shane
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If you have the 24-105 and the 150-600, then the only thing you really need to add to your bag is an ultrawide. I have a Tokina 12-24mm f/4 that I like a lot. Casey and others have the 11-16mm f/2.8, and those are awesome lenses as well.

Get a tripod though. You'll like it much better for landscapes and even some wildlife shooting in some situations.
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Old 02-10-2017, 11:47 AM   #10
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I've never been bitten by the wide angle bug I guess. I'm shooting full frame and I seldom even use the low end of my Canon 24-70mm f/2.8L. To the best of my recollection, I only used one lens at Yellowstone and at Grand Teton, the Tamron 150-600mm. I shot the landscapes at 150mm...



Pretty much everything else at 600mm and then cropped.

BUT... I really like Shane and Casey's scenic shots, so I probably need to get on board with wide angle.
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Old 02-11-2017, 09:40 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shane View Post
If you have the 24-105 and the 150-600, then the only thing you really need to add to your bag is an ultrawide. I have a Tokina 12-24mm f/4 that I like a lot. Casey and others have the 11-16mm f/2.8, and those are awesome lenses as well.

Get a tripod though. You'll like it much better for landscapes and even some wildlife shooting in some situations.
Love the Tokina 11-16mm best lens almost better then Nikon's ver.
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Old 02-11-2017, 04:23 PM   #12
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Agree with snakelover - been west (and Yellowstone ) a lot - tamron will be what you use 95% of the time - that is big country! You'll be just packing the rest of them
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Old 03-02-2017, 10:14 PM   #13
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have a cannon 70-200mm forsale if interested
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