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Old 01-10-2018, 12:09 PM   #1
LiftAndShoot
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Default Spring food plots in deep cover

Hey guys,

So, the season is winding down in my spot and I'm really charged up to get the quality up for next year, put in the work, and re-secure my 'spot' in the family hunting pecking order. I've mapped out a few spots that I want to do small, quarter or eighth acre food plots - but there's a catch; most of them are under a pretty impressive canopy of oaks/hardwoods. I have basically no experience leading the charge on food plots, so I'm trying to do it right, but also easy. I'm going to be getting/sending off some soil samples to find out what the area needs.

What I'm wondering is; assuming it works with the soil, what kind of forage grows in mottled sun and/or with canopy coverage in a condensed space?

Anyone have experience?

Thanks,
LaS.
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Old 01-10-2018, 12:23 PM   #2
gingib
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My suggestion is this: I would do slightly bigger ones and less of them. 1/3-1/2 acre plots at minimum.

Spring plots need to be bigger or the deer will eat it all before it has a chance to establish.

Rent a dozer or have someone do some work. You can get it done roughly $110 an hour and won't take more then a half days work to clear 2-3 plots.

Take out some of the oaks also in these areas. A few is ok but take out alot of them for more sun. The straight ones for bow stands or the biggest I prefer to keep
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Old 01-10-2018, 12:24 PM   #3
Drycreek3189
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Clover grows well in part shade, but in our climate needs to be planted in the fall so it can put down good roots before the heat of summer.

Iron clay peas have done well for me in spring but they won't do well in small plots because the deer will wipe them out.

You might look at the QDMA website and find some info. Sorry I'm no help.
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Old 01-10-2018, 12:27 PM   #4
LiftAndShoot
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Hmm.

If I can plant something that the deer will eat and will take root in the east Texas spring and wall it off to prevent them (deer) from mowing it down, would that be wise/doable?
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Old 01-10-2018, 12:30 PM   #5
gingib
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LiftAndShoot View Post
Hmm.

If I can plant something that the deer will eat and will take root in the east Texas spring and wall it off to prevent them (deer) from mowing it down, would that be wise/doable?
How will you wall it off? A hotwire or HF is the only way. And with a hotwire you can save that money for dozer work
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Old 01-10-2018, 12:42 PM   #6
Drycreek3189
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LiftAndShoot View Post
Hmm.

If I can plant something that the deer will eat and will take root in the east Texas spring and wall it off to prevent them (deer) from mowing it down, would that be wise/doable?
Depends a lot on deer density. A hot fence will save it only until you take the fence down IMO. In the fall, deer browse and move, in the spring, with no rut or hunting pressure, they will just mow it down when you drop the fence. I'm talking day and night. The plots you are planning are too small for spring plots IMO. Gingib has an excellent idea.....if you can do it. Circumstances may prevent clearing in your case. I have lots of plots, large and small, but all the small ones are clover blends and it's a two year crop, meaning it's not going to amount to much the first fall, but will go gangbusters in the first spring.....if the soil is right and you have the moisture. Good luck whatever you decide.
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