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Old 05-19-2017, 07:26 AM   #1
JAGR
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Default Process Technology jobs

Wanting a career change and have been applying heavily to these positions.

I have a BS in geology from Texas A&M and have worked in O&G since I graduated in 2010.

Is it worth it to get a process technology certification?

What can I do to set myself apart with no actual petrochemical experience?

Any advice would be much appreciated.



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Old 05-19-2017, 07:41 AM   #2
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I don't know if your interested but right now we have a job listing for Lab Tech at the Motiva Port Arthur Refinery. Look online at Motiva.com
I do not think a Process Technology degree will help you get a job as an operator. The degree that you have should be enough. It's more like hitting the lottery getting through the first steps.
Good Luck
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Old 05-19-2017, 07:42 AM   #3
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I don't know if your interested but right now we have a job listing for Lab Tech at the Motiva Port Arthur Refinery. Look online at Motiva.com
I do not think a Process Technology degree will help you get a job as an operator. The degree that you have should be enough. It's more like hitting the lottery getting through the first steps.
Good Luck
T-roy


That's what I'm beginning to notice.


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Old 05-19-2017, 07:53 AM   #4
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I worked in this field for around 35 years, made a decent living and I am retired now. Personally if I were going to put two years into schooling it wouldn't be process technology. Reason being shift work, hard on a family life, you work in a carcinogenic environment not to mention a very hazardous environment. The money is good, work isn't that physically demanding from my experiences but you do earn it so to speak. What I am trying to say is if you are going to put more time into schooling put it towards a career where you can market yourself. In procecess technolgy you may not be able to go to work for one of the larger companies with the benefits immediately. These are just my observations from an old has been and only worth .02. The educational background you have now should be sufficient. Good luck!!

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Old 05-19-2017, 07:54 AM   #5
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I worked in this field for around 35 years, made a decent living and I am retired now. Personally if I was going to put two into schooling it wouldn't be process technology. Reason being shift work, hard on a family life, you work in a carcinogenic environment not to mention a very hazardous environment. The money is good, work isn't that physically demanding from my experiences but you do earn it so to speak. What I am trying to say is if you are going to put more time into schooling put it towards a career where you can market yourself. In procecess technolgy you may not be able to go to work for one of the larger companies with the benefits immediately. These are just my observations from an old has been and only worth .02. Good luck!!


Appreciate the advice!


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Old 05-19-2017, 09:19 AM   #6
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Your best bet, if you would like to vo that route, is to get on with ine of the smaller plants and get some experience/contacts and then try and advance into larger companies. The pay, benefits, etc may not be as good, but you will be learning and gaining experience you can use further down the road. There is very little turnover at the large refineries, and they have a huge pool of applicants to pull from. Most jobs go to people that have been refered by either management or a long time, well respected employee.

There has been a shift over the last 5-10 years away from hiring degreed canidates straight out of college, and more toward hiring experienced people. The degree can still open a lot of doors, but there is no substitute for experience. My only advice is apply, apply, apply!!

To set yourself apart, get a job where you actually work in a plant. This helps you network and make a good impression both with the operators and management. It also gives you some experience, even though not directly related to operations, with the way plants run on a day to day basis. It is a totally different world compared to most jobs outside of plants and is a real eye opener when you start.

Eventually someone will run across your resume and pull it for an interview. It is a VERY hard career to break into and there is a lot of "brother in law" deals that go on when hiring for those positions. Took me almost 10 years to get on as an E/I with a small chemical plant. Probably would have been much quicker with a degree. When i hired on, the average tenure was about 20 years and we have only hired 3 new employees in the 6 years ive been here.



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Old 05-19-2017, 10:00 AM   #7
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As fishingsetx said a lot of plants are going away from requiring the classes. I work for ExxonMobil and they do not require it, neither does chevron, lyondell, enterprise etc.....my advice and what worked for me, get a list of smaller chem. plants near you and every so often send your resume to every single one of them. They are either going to email telling you to leave them the hell alone or give you an interview! Its a long journey but very much worth it, Good Luck to you sir!
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Old 05-19-2017, 10:43 AM   #8
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Chevron Phillips is hiring in Baytown in the near future. Great company. Also BOP @ Exxon
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Old 05-19-2017, 10:46 AM   #9
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Chevron Phillips is hiring in Baytown in the near future. Great company. Also BOP @ Exxon
That's where im at BOP, we have a lot going on as far as our new facility and after this one is completed were building another huge plant in Corpus.
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Old 05-19-2017, 10:49 AM   #10
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That's where im at BOP, we have a lot going on as far as our new facility and after this one is completed were building another huge plant in Corpus.


I heard about that. All they're waiting on is approval from the county.


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Old 05-19-2017, 10:55 AM   #11
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I heard about that. All they're waiting on is approval from the county.


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Yessir, that is going to be a huge huge facility they are building. Gonna take a long time to get it done but going to be tons of jobs there.
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Old 05-19-2017, 10:57 AM   #12
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Yessir, that is going to be a huge huge facility they are building. Gonna take a long time to get it done but going to be tons of jobs there.


Hopefully I'll have some experience when the time comes for them to start staffing up.


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Old 05-19-2017, 11:01 AM   #13
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As mentioned above it's hard to get into. If you get a interview with Motiva shoot me a pm! I'll vouch for you because I don't like the "family hiring". I had a 4 year degree and went back for the p-tech degree because of the economy in 08-09. I wouldn't at this time with a better economy.
Shift work is the dumbest schedule you will ever work but it pays well. Good luck!
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Old 05-19-2017, 11:18 AM   #14
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Hopefully I'll have some experience when the time comes for them to start staffing up.


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Just make sure you get online and start a profile with exxon and get set up to test. Ive heard of people testing and having a job within a few months so you never know. Its a roll of the dice, if you get a test let me know and ill help out any way that I can! Again goo luck through all this!
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Old 05-19-2017, 01:59 PM   #15
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Just make sure you get online and start a profile with exxon and get set up to test. Ive heard of people testing and having a job within a few months so you never know. Its a roll of the dice, if you get a test let me know and ill help out any way that I can! Again goo luck through all this!


Thanks man!


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Old 05-19-2017, 04:51 PM   #16
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As fishingsetx said a lot of plants are going away from requiring the classes. I work for ExxonMobil and they do not require it, neither does chevron, lyondell, enterprise etc.....my advice and what worked for me, get a list of smaller chem. plants near you and every so often send your resume to every single one of them. They are either going to email telling you to leave them the hell alone or give you an interview! Its a long journey but very much worth it, Good Luck to you sir!
Since when are they going away from preferring the classes?
Every interview committee I have been part of prefers either experience, the p tech degree, or both.
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Old 05-19-2017, 05:02 PM   #17
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Since when are they going away from preferring the classes?
Every interview committee I have been part of prefers either experience, the p tech degree, or both.
ExxonMobil is the only company I know that doesn't require experience, or degree. I've worked at 2 other major companies and they all required at least 2 years experience or 2 year degree. Getting a certificate in Process is pointless when companies require the degree. Yes some people luck up and get Process Operator jobs with no experience or degree but its not the norm. Its actually offending to an extent that someone thinks just because they have a 4 year degree they should be able to just get a dumb operator job. IMO in my opinion the experience in 2 year degree should be required everywhere. To many folks hire on and are pointless about what being an Operator is. I remember hiring on and a girl didn't even know it was a shift job.
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Old 05-19-2017, 05:05 PM   #18
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Since when are they going away from preferring the classes?
Every interview committee I have been part of prefers either experience, the p tech degree, or both.
I would have to agree with this. If you do go back to school for 2 years, I would suggest I/E. Work days, and have a marketable craft. When my former employer shut down most of our plant, there were a lot of operators that to this day don't have as good of a job as they had. As an instrument tech. I had no problem. I've had two "permanent" jobs since age 52. Quit the first to move to the one I'm currently in.
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Old 05-19-2017, 05:09 PM   #19
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Default Process Technology jobs

So the local community college offers a p tech certificate. It's three semesters of course work ~ 35 hours. Combined with my degree, would it be worth it or would it better to go ahead and get an associates in ptech?


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Old 05-19-2017, 05:16 PM   #20
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So the local community college offers a p tech certificate. It's three semesters of course work ~ 35 hours. Combined with my degree, would it be worth it or would it better to go ahead and get an associates in ptech?


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What would be the difference in course load?
I personally think I would either go for the associates or nothing. I am currently a production technician with no degree or certificates. I started as a field service technician and got a few years of really good experience. After that was able to easily get an operations job.
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Old 05-19-2017, 05:16 PM   #21
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I would have to agree with this. If you do go back to school for 2 years, I would suggest I/E. Work days, and have a marketable craft. When my former employer shut down most of our plant, there were a lot of operators that to this day don't have as good of a job as they had. As an instrument tech. I had no problem. I've had two "permanent" jobs since age 52. Quit the first to move to the one I'm currently in.


I'm certified in ACAD because I was originally looking into a career in I/E design. The local community college doesn't offer a instrument tech degree, I believe.


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Old 05-19-2017, 05:43 PM   #22
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I've been operating natural gas plants for 5.5 years. Your degree won't get you anywhere in most places. Maybe big refineries but I make more staying where I am. It's hard with a family. I work 14/14 and when I'm on shift I'm 7 hours away the entire 14+. But lots of OT. They don't micromanage me. They know I know how to do my job and leave me alone. You won't get that with the big boys. I came from DCP. They micro manage just like all the others. You'll be under a guy who probably doesn't know how to do your job like you do but talks a big talk and ended up where he is. That's my pet peeve about big companies. I've been offered plant manager positions. I declined until I feel I am very well qualified to tell those guys how to do their job. If you're interested in a 14/14 job in a remote location, PM me. Let's talk.
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Old 05-19-2017, 07:02 PM   #23
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My brother and I both got process tech degrees and both got jobs as operators with no experience


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Old 05-19-2017, 07:48 PM   #24
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If you're wanting to hire on as an operator, id get the P&T degree, im an operator offshore and got selected for an interview with DuPont sever years ago. they took 40 of us out of 4,000 who tested. I missed getting a spot because I didn't have the degree but had 6 yrs of experience. So in my opinion, go get the degree and make sure you have the upper hand when it comes down to the nut cutting. With the paper and experience it makes you a WAY better candidate on paper.
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Old 05-19-2017, 07:58 PM   #25
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I've been operating natural gas plants for 5.5 years. Your degree won't get you anywhere in most places. Maybe big refineries but I make more staying where I am. It's hard with a family. I work 14/14 and when I'm on shift I'm 7 hours away the entire 14+. But lots of OT. They don't micromanage me. They know I know how to do my job and leave me alone. You won't get that with the big boys. I came from DCP. They micro manage just like all the others. You'll be under a guy who probably doesn't know how to do your job like you do but talks a big talk and ended up where he is. That's my pet peeve about big companies. I've been offered plant manager positions. I declined until I feel I am very well qualified to tell those guys how to do their job. If you're interested in a 14/14 job in a remote location, PM me. Let's talk.
Don't knock the big boys when it comes to benefits, money, and raises. Being under the microscope can be a pain. And, remote locations can be nice if you do not like being closely supervised. I have done both. I work for Marathon Refining and they bought Mark West. I considered applying for one of the positions they were advertising at their facilities. But, since I am at the top of my pay scale there was no comparison in the pay.
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Old 05-19-2017, 08:24 PM   #26
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I would have to agree with this. If you do go back to school for 2 years, I would suggest I/E. Work days, and have a marketable craft. When my former employer shut down most of our plant, there were a lot of operators that to this day don't have as good of a job as they had. As an instrument tech. I had no problem. I've had two "permanent" jobs since age 52. Quit the first to move to the one I'm currently in.
This is what I would suggest also. There's a shortage of I/E Techs. We had a job posted for nearly 6 months before we hired someone, and he's not even really qualified, they just needed to fill the spot, and this is a major chemical company. Even if you don't land a job with a plant right away, you can make $40+hr as a contractor. I hate shift work so I couldn't be an operator.
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Old 05-19-2017, 08:47 PM   #27
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Don't knock the big boys when it comes to benefits, money, and raises. Being under the microscope can be a pain. And, remote locations can be nice if you do not like being closely supervised. I have done both. I work for Marathon Refining and they bought Mark West. I considered applying for one of the positions they were advertising at their facilities. But, since I am at the top of my pay scale there was no comparison in the pay.
The benefits were nice at DCP. Which is one of the biggest out there which you know. It wasn't worth it. I will say you have to be very self motivated to work like I do out here. If you need to be told what to do then you won't last. Pay is better here for me. But I have turned down done really good offers to go back to 7/7 and move back to west texas. Won't do it unless I have to.
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Old 05-19-2017, 09:50 PM   #28
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Take it from someone who worked shift work for 25 years as an operator, add to the degree you have and find another job. Look into safety, take a few classes and take a job to get experience. I moved into a training roll, everyone hates training!

The operator jobs pay well but they put up with a lot of crap. It all started will the PT schools and companies requiring that degree, most have zero talent and no idea how to run a chemical plant so the company tries to make everything idiot proof!
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Old 05-19-2017, 11:40 PM   #29
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Like stated above there are only a few companies that do not require a degree. My company requires either a P-Tech degree or 2 years of process experience. That being said, I've been in the industry over 25 years and if I had to do it all over again I would go into I/E or become a millwright. You really never get used to shiftwork and it takes a toll on your body and family.
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Old 05-20-2017, 03:28 AM   #30
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Analyzer tech is a really good gig. Normally 4-10's and usually a step above I&E in pay.
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Old 05-20-2017, 06:56 AM   #31
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What does I/E stand for?
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Old 05-20-2017, 06:58 AM   #32
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Instrumentation/electrical
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Old 05-20-2017, 06:58 AM   #33
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Analyzer tech is a really good gig. Normally 4-10's and usually a step above I&E in pay.


What are the prerequisites for this job? Brief job description?


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Old 05-20-2017, 06:58 AM   #34
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What does I/E stand for?


Instrument and electrical


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Old 05-20-2017, 07:42 AM   #35
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Analyzer tech is a really good gig. Normally 4-10's and usually a step above I&E in pay.
Yep. Measurement and I&E jobs are where the easy money is lol. You gotta be pretty sharp on electrical though.
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Old 05-20-2017, 08:01 AM   #36
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What are the prerequisites for this job? Brief job description?


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https://petrochemworks.com/job/analyzer-technician

Very high demand. Great job and pay.
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Old 05-20-2017, 08:28 AM   #37
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look into and apply for I&E where I work they get paid the same as operations but work Monday through Friday. And every once in a while they hire people with no experience and send them to school and let them work so they still get there 40hours. We are hiring operators and welder/pipefitter now also.
http://www.ascendmaterials.com/work/
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Old 05-20-2017, 08:41 AM   #38
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As everyone else is stating, if you go back to school, go I/E. Same basic classes as process operator, but more flexibility in jobs (PO, I/E, analyzer tech, etc). Board operators usually get paid slightly more, but they normally have years of experience. Outside operators are usually paid slightly less than I/E, but the OT built into their schedule usually puts them making slightly more. I/E normally work 4-10's or 5-8's depending on the plant and sometimes work shift (again depending on the plant). A lot less stress and a lot less hassle for basically the same pay. You also have the ability to move to operations with an I/E degree. Last plus is there are normally 3-4 times as many process operators graduate every year compared to I/E. Around here, the market is saturated with canidates with process operator degrees. Thats why plants are looking for experienced operators instead of just degreed candidates.

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Old 05-20-2017, 09:08 AM   #39
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I've been working shift work for ten years now and if I could do it again I'd do the instrument tech program. Like others have said you don't have to work shift work and you'll get the same benefits as everyone else. Also something to think about is how flooded the market is with people trying to get into operations jobs. There are even pages on Facebook with several thousands talking about who is testing and where. Also most of the baby boomers have retired and the hiring is really slowing down making it even harder to get in.
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Old 05-20-2017, 11:50 AM   #40
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I've been working shift work for ten years now and if I could do it again I'd do the instrument tech program. Like others have said you don't have to work shift work and you'll get the same benefits as everyone else. Also something to think about is how flooded the market is with people trying to get into operations jobs. There are even pages on Facebook with several thousands talking about who is testing and where. Also most of the baby boomers have retired and the hiring is really slowing down making it even harder to get in.


The more research I do, the more I am thinking I&E is the way to go.

Thanks for the replies!


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Old 05-20-2017, 12:08 PM   #41
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Wanting a career change and have been applying heavily to these positions.

I have a BS in geology from Texas A&M and have worked in O&G since I graduated in 2010.

Is it worth it to get a process technology certification?

What can I do to set myself apart with no actual petrochemical experience?

Any advice would be much appreciated.



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Old 05-20-2017, 12:13 PM   #42
MisterSanders
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I've been working shift work for ten years now and if I could do it again I'd do the instrument tech program. Like others have said you don't have to work shift work and you'll get the same benefits as everyone else. Also something to think about is how flooded the market is with people trying to get into operations jobs. There are even pages on Facebook with several thousands talking about who is testing and where. Also most of the baby boomers have retired and the hiring is really slowing down making it even harder to get in.
"working" is a loose term. Be sure you tuck your pants inside your boots, tends to get pretty deep.
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Old 05-20-2017, 12:20 PM   #43
JAGR
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"working" is a loose term. Be sure you tuck your pants inside your boots, tends to get pretty deep.





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Old 05-20-2017, 05:00 PM   #44
Maxxed Outdoors
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"working" is a loose term. Be sure you tuck your pants inside your boots, tends to get pretty deep.
That's against plant policy! Oh and don't forget to tuck your shirt in..
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Old 05-20-2017, 07:09 PM   #45
fishingsetx
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That's against plant policy! Oh and don't forget to tuck your shirt in..
And dont forget your harness and yo-yos in an open field 3 rungs up a 6' step ladder! Also, make sure you are clean shaven so a resperator seals well even though, you are not fit tested to wear a respirator and wearing one without being fit tested can mean immediate termination.

Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it. - Mark Twain
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